Animation highbrow and somewhat lower meets as the Simpsons wander Miyazaki's worlds.

Animation highbrow and somewhat lower meets as the Simpsons wander Miyazaki’s worlds.

A brief item on this Change of Venue Friday (who wants anything else?).

This piece may be a little dated, as it originally occurred back in January. But it’s worth showing again.

If you are a fan of (1) The Simpsons and/or (2) filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki, you may recall that the TV show offered up a show that was a tribute to the Japanese legend. Back in January, he had announced that he was done with the artistry of creating films, saddening millions who have enjoyed his work.

Here is a news story about the charming mashup.

(Not familiar with Miyazaki? Here is his filmography.)

So here are two Friday treats for Miyazaki fans. The first is a trailer from The Simpson’s special episode. (The complete show is filled with movie references.)

And here, because I can, enjoy Catbus, a costume that combines a beloved Miyazaki character and adds, um, a cat.

Why, yes, that is a Catbus. (Thank you, Mr. Miyazaki!)

Why, yes, that is a Catbus. (Thank you, Mr. Miyazaki!)

Have a wonderful and spirited weekend.

Attorney Rodney Glassman speaks to educators at the Madison Elementary District offices, Sept. 15, 2014.

Attorney Rodney Glassman speaks to educators at the Madison Elementary District offices, Sept. 15, 2014.

On Monday, educators gathered at a school district office to hear about an initiative that aids literacy—environmental and otherwise.

Attorney Rodney Glassman spoke to the group at the Madison School District offices about the series of books featuring Jeremy Jackrabbit—a creation of his and his wife Sasha Glassman (also a lawyer, as well as a school board member in Madison).

Glassman Jeremy Jackrabbit 4 book character

Jeremy Jackrabbit

An upcoming issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine will describe the book project—the fourth in the series. When the student illustration contest is complete and the book is done next spring, almost 60,000 kindergartners around the state will be treated to a free copy of this year’s “Jeremy Jackrabbit Saves Every Drop.”

For more information (for you or the youth artists in your life):

Once the story in our October issue is live, I’ll share that here too. And then, come spring, we’ll tell you how the initiative is hip-hopping along.

Constitution DayIn case you hadn’t made your Constitution Day plans yet, I recommend to you a great video that includes a retired Supreme Court—and Arizona—jurist.

The National Association of Women Judges has launched a public service announcement (in separate video and audio). In it, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor discusses the value of free and fair courts.

And what is more constitutional than that?

Here is the video:

Fair and Free – Full Film – featuring Sandra Day O’Connor (EN) from Informed Voters Project on Vimeo.

Below is more background from the association (and a hat tip to Francine Walker of The Florida Bar for putting me on this very cool trail!)

“In honor of Constitution Day, September 17, the ‘Informed Voters Project’ sponsored by the National Association of Women Judges (NAWJ), has released a new :30 second TV public service announcement and a :60 second radio announcement featuring retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. The PSA campaign’s message is a reminder that politics and partisanship have no place in the courts of the United States of America.”

“The National Association of Women Judges ‘Informed Voters – Fair Judges’ project is a non-partisan voter education project developed to increase public awareness about the judicial system, to inform voters that politics and special interest attacks have no place in the courts, and to give voters the tools they need to exercise an informed vote in favor of fair and impartial courts.”

More details c­­an be found here.

Downtown Phoenix Sheraton

Downtown Phoenix Sheraton

On Thursday, another in a popular series of networking events for lawyers will be staged in downtown Phoenix. You should consider stopping by.

Hosted by the State Bar of Arizona (Mentor Committee and Young Lawyers Division), it will be held on Thursday, September 18, at the downtown Phoenix Sheraton Hotel, in its District American Kitchen and Wine Bar.

This is the fourth annual such kick-off event, and the previous ones have been crowded and enjoyable affairs.

Here is an image with more particulars:

State Bar Networking event 09-18-14And here is a map:

U.S. Supreme_Court

This Wednesday, September 17, we get another in a popular series of analyses from the recent U.S. Supreme Court Term.

Organized by the State Bar CLE folks, it will include the thoughts of Judge George Anagnost as moderator, as well as panelists ASU Law Professor Paul Bender, Arizona Summit Law Professor Dave Cole, and attorney–scholar Bob McWhirter.

As they describe it:

“This symposium will review significant cases for the October 2013 Term including the Hobby Lobby and the Town of Greece case. The program will feature scholars on the Court focusing on cases presenting important questions of law, comments on individual justices’ legal perspectives, and a preview of petitions for certiorari for this coming October Term 2014.”

More information is here. I hope to see you there.

What, the IKEA catalog is a bookbook? What could be better?

What, the IKEA catalog is a bookbook? What could be better?

Yesterday, I admired the writing and images in a national magazine. Today, I’m all about a consumer catalog. (You may start to think I like print products or something.)

On this Change of Venue Friday, I take you to IKEA. Not literally to IKEA, of course, but to an online offering of theirs that makes you smile.

The video the company created (see below) is in honor of its iconic print catalog—hundreds of pages of dead trees that modern thinking suggests is decidedly passe. But—no surprise—IKEA doesn’t agree. Enjoy its take, not an an ebook, but on a “bookbook.”

 

You can read more about the video in this Adweek story.

The “creative” behind the video is very, very smart. It skewers and parodies the manner of selling modern digital products. By the time they’re done you not only want to get your hands on the print catalog. You also will never be able to watch a solemn and self-important technology commercial ever again.

Have a wonderful weekend, and maybe stop by IKEA – now there’s a Stockholm syndrome I can get behind.

Lawyers and history buffs (and many more) should read this month's Wired Magazine coverage of Edward Snowden.

Lawyers and history buffs (and many more) should read this month’s Wired Magazine coverage of Edward Snowden.

I can suggest a few reasons you should read the cover story in this month’s Wired Magazine.

First, you should always read the cover story in Wired Magazine. But you probably want more reason than that.

OK. Second, the legal-lover in you knows you’re aching to gain some insight into Edward Snowden’s role in an ongoing international incident. How does he justify his actions? Will the American people ultimately view him as a villain or as an aid to American transparency?

The U.S. government’s response to that second question is a complicated and not entirely coherent one. It has ranged from throwing around the word “treason” to claiming pleasure at the resulting dialogue about the NSA and the CIA (always, of course, without praising Snowden).

If that legal insight is all you aspire to, the Wired feature story based on exclusive one-on-one conversations with the former intelligence operative should please you very much. You can read the whole story here.

BUT … if you, like me, enjoy gaining insight into how magazines are created, then you really need to read the opening letter by the editor-in-chief too. (Yes, some of us read those too!)

It is only in Scott Dadich’s column that you will learn how Platon’s phenomenal photos came to be. You’ll read about the machinations that led to surreptitious meetings in Russian hotel rooms. And you’ll marvel at how random inexpensive props bought in Manhattan spurred the imagination of Snowden thousands of miles east.

Kudos to the editor, writer James Bamford, director of photography Patrick Witty, and photographer Platon. This is an amazing accomplishment.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,433 other followers