Board of Governors meeting, Westin La Paloma, Tucson, June 13, 2017.

Board of Governors meeting, Westin La Paloma, Tucson, June 13, 2017.

At its regular annual meeting at the State Bar Convention this afternoon, the State Bar of Arizona Board of Governors confirmed its slate of officers for the coming year. The new roster includes the newest officer, Secretary/Treasurer Lori Higuera, elected today:

  • President: Alex Vakula
  • President-Elect: Jeff Willis
  • Vice President: Brian Y. Furuya
  • Secretary/Treasurer: Lori Higuera

Following board bylaws, the new slate of officers assume their positions at the close of the annual meeting.

Follow more news via this Convention Daily and on Twitter (@azatty) and Instagram (@statebarofarizona), hashtag #azbarcon

sba_logo_color State Bar of ArizonaAn announcement from the State Bar of Arizona:

Members of the State Bar of Arizona have elected 10 attorneys to serve as their representatives on the Bar’s Board of Governors. The Board is the governing body of the State Bar, a nonprofit association that exists to serve and protect the public with respect to the provision of legal services and access to justice.

Thirty people serve on the Board of Governors, including four public members who are not attorneys. Board members are elected by district on a staggered schedule.

Below is a list of the newly elected Board members and returning incumbents. Their election will be confirmed by the certification of the results at the State Bar’s annual convention, June 14-16, 2017.

Elected Board Members

District 6 (Maricopa County) 

  • Benjamin P. Taylor, Taylor & Gomez LLP
  • Sam Saks, Smith Paknejad PLC
  • Jessica S. Sanchez, Tempe Union High School District
  • Jennifer R. Rebholz, Choate & Seletos
  • Pouria Paknejad, Smith Paknejad PLC
  • David Wm. Engelman, Engelman Berger PC
  • Tyler J. Carrell, Gallagher & Kennedy PA
  • Sara A. Siesco, Ely, Bettini, Ulman, Rosenblatt & Ozer
  • Robert J. McWhirter, The Law Offices of Robert J. McWhirter

District 8 (Pinal County)

  • Denis M. Fitzgibbons, Fitzgibbons Law Offices PLC

President, Young Lawyers Division

  • Daniel J. Mazza, Mazza Law Center PLC, Scottsdale

The president of the State Bar’s Young Lawyers Division is not elected, but automatically serves as a voting board member during his/her one-year term as YLD President.

Public Member

  • Jason E. Cobb of Compass Fiduciary Group LLC in Phoenix was selected by the board to fill one public member opening on the board.

This press release is also posted online here.

You can read more about the candidates, via their own statements, which we ran in the May issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine.

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State Bar Governors sought for two Districts.

The State Bar of Arizona calls for candidates to apply for a position on its governing board, the Board of Governors. Complete packets are due to the Bar by tomorrow, Tuesday, February 28, at 5:00 p.m.

Openings exist in two counties/Bar districts. There are nine openings in Maricopa County (District 6), and one opening in Pinal County (District 8).

State Bar of Arizona logo
Among the interesting aspects to this election:

  • For the first time ever, out-of-state members can vote (in the District of their most recent Arizona residence or place of business or, if none, in Bar District 6/Maricopa County).
  • Terms for those prevailing in this election will be for two years. Although Board terms are typically three years, in 2019 the Board of Governors faces a “reset,” required by an Arizona Supreme Court change to Rule 32, Ariz.R.S.Ct., which will result in a recomposition of the Board and staggered terms for members.

More information on the process and required documents for the nomination packet are here.

If you have any questions about nominations or the election process, contact Carrie Sherman at 602-340-7201 or at Carrie.Sherman@staff.azbar.org.

Arizona election errors have been making the news ... today, and generations ago. November 2016 Arizona Attorney Magazine

Arizona election errors have been making the news … today, and generations ago.

If you haven’t voted yet, stop reading, put down your device, and get to your polling place. Now.

But if you have, then kick back with your I Voted Sticker (you earned it) and enjoy a tale of election administration errors from 1936. In many ways, the lessons it offers are as fresh as 2016.

Our cover story in the November 2016 issue is a terrific one. As attorney–author Joe Kanefield opens his article:

Attorneys Joe Kanefield and Kelly Schwab present at the State Bar of Arizona Convention, June 2013.

Attorneys Joe Kanefield and Kelly Schwab present at the State Bar of Arizona Convention, June 2013.

“The Arizona Secretary of State faces scrutiny after failing to distribute voter-information pamphlets in advance of an election as required by law. A concerned citizen fears that voters casting ballots for a controversial education proposition will be uninformed and files a complaint to postpone the election. The Secretary responds and urges the election to proceed.”

“No, this story isn’t about Secretary of State Michele Reagan in 2016—it’s about Secretary of State James Kerby, 80 years earlier in 1936. But if the story sounds familiar, that is because history has indeed repeated itself.”

“So, what happens when an election official neglects to perform a mandatory duty required by the Arizona Constitution and state law? What are the consequences? What should they be?”

“This article addresses these questions by reviewing the respective situations in which Secretaries Kerby and Reagan found themselves when they neglected to deliver pamphlets to voters prior to the November 3, 1936, general election and the May 17, 2016, special election.”

You can read the whole story here.

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Thank you to Joe Kanefield for conceiving of and writing such a relevant story of ballot woe!

And … Happy Election Day!

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An upcoming State Bar of Arizona program explores the continued barriers to Native American electoral participation.

An upcoming State Bar of Arizona program explores the continued barriers to Native American electoral participation.

Still unsure what barriers prevent or dissuade Native American participation in the electoral process? As we head into election season, the barriers to exercising the franchise—and progress eradicating those barriers—will be addressed in a Phoenix program on Thursday, October 20.

Titled “Political Buy-In: A Look at the Barriers to (and) Participation of Native Americans in Tribal, State and Federal Elections,” organizers at the State Bar of Arizona describe it this way:

“This program will examine both the advances in Native American participation in all levels of elections and the continued barriers to effective participation in the election process. Participants can expect to gain a broad overview of how redistricting efforts, voter ID laws, and language barriers continue to marginalize Native Americans at the polls. The program will also look at possible changes to Native American participation at the federal level.”

A public radio program this week illustrates just how basic some of those barriers can be. In this story, journalist Carrie Jung spoke with Native Americans who face clear and existential obstacles to participating in elections.

Among those barriers are language challenges; traveling large distances, perhaps without a car; and even obtaining a voter ID when you have no formal address.

As Lori Riddle told Jung, “We’re used to giving directions out here by landmarks. There’s a tree. There’s two trees. There’s a big bush with purple flowers on it. [Poll workers have] tried to turn me away on a few occasions, even though they knew me.”

Among the topics to be discussed at the October 20 seminar are:

  • Voting Accessibility Act
  • Voter treatment in the polling places
  • Current lobbying trends in Native American Country
  • Implications of lack of early access voting for Native American voters
  • Constitutional guarantees

Panelists will be:

  • Heather Sibbison, Dentons LLP, Washington, DC
  • Patty Ferguson-Bohnee, ASU Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law
  • James T. Tucker, Armstrong Teasdale LLP, Las Vegas, NV
  • Mary O’Grady, Osborn Maledon PA, Phoenix

The seminar chair will be Virjinya Torrez, Assistant Attorney General for the Tohono O’odham Nation.

You can register here.

If you’re wondering why all this still matters in 2016, Patty Ferguson-Bohnee breaks it down as she speaks to KJZZ’s Carrie Jung:

“We’re the first people of the United States. And when people face these roadblocks, sometimes they’re not empowered. And we want to empower people. We’re a democracy.”

Speaker photos are below (click to enlarge).

Loyal to the democratic process? You may want to vote in a Bar election before it closes Wednesday afternoon. I voted sticker dog

Loyal to the democratic process? You may want to vote in a Bar election before it closes Wednesday afternoon.

[Note: This post was corrected to indicate that voting is done not on the State Bar website but via a link and credentials emailed directly to each affected Arizona attorney.]

Many of you may have done your civic duty and voted on some high-profile statewide propositions. But did you know that if you are an Arizona-admitted attorney in certain counties, you should be voting in another election too—one that determines who will sit on the State Bar Board of Governors?

And that online election closes at 5:00 p.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, May 18.

State Bar of Arizona SBA_Logo_ColorAs the State Bar says:

“An election will be held this year to elect one member each from District 1 (Apache, Coconino, Mohave, and Navajo Counties), District 3 (Gila, Graham, and Greenlee Counties), District 4 (Cochise County), and District 7 (La Paz and Yuma Counties). Three members from District 5 (Pima and Santa Cruz Counties) will also be elected. Each elected member will serve a three-year term starting this June.”

So, yes, there are some contested elections. You can read how the candidates described themselves and their values here in Arizona Attorney Magazine.

And for even more functionality in reading about and seeing the candidates, go to the Bar’s user-friendly website here.

Finally, in order to cast your ballot, see the email sent directly to you from State Bar CEO John Phelps. That email contains a link to the ballot and your specific credentials to do so.

(Click to enlarge the images below.)

A voter speaks ... and urges an indiscriminate no vote on all judges.

A voter speaks … and urges an indiscriminate no vote on all judges.

Much effort has been expended by many folks—including the State Bar of Arizona—to get voters in state elections to “finish the ballot.” The notion is that many people care deeply about the “top races,” but fatigue sets in as they move down their ballot and reach the judges.

I wrote about the issue here.

So what an unpleasant surprise this weekend to see a bumper-sticker in Phoenix that urged voters to do the same—but not in an informed way. Instead, the placard (depicted above) recommends that everyone vote no on all the judges all the time.

Always Vote No On Judges: It only gets worse close up.

Always Vote No On Judges: It only gets worse close up.

Somehow, I don’t think the indiscriminate and uneducated wielding of the no vote is what our nation’s founders had in mind. But that’s what we face, more and more.

Have a good week.