We may not all mean the same thing when we discuss workplace ethics. I'd like to hear your ideas, and stories too.

We may not all mean the same thing when we discuss workplace ethics. I’d like to hear your ideas, and stories too.

What are we talking about when we talk about ethics in the workplace? Like most important topics, it may be more difficult to define than we typically imagine.

At the end of this month, I have the opportunity to present on the topic of the ethical workplace. The audience will be organization leaders at the National Association of Bar Executives annual meeting, so my focus will go beyond “Please don’t steal the Post-Its” (though they shouldn’t). Instead, I’m aiming to discuss the ethical decision-points that leaders face daily—hidden as they may be among the workaday grind.

My presentation is nearly done, but I’d like to include some other examples of noteworthy leader ethics, so I invite you to write me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org. The anecdote may come from your own organization or from one you’ve heard about. And it can be for attribution or entirely anonymous. In fact, feel free to cast your story to me as a hypothetical. That works just fine.

To help you cogitate on this, here is my presentation description:

“Ethical Decision-Making: The Courage to Say No. Leadership requires making decisions that affect people and resources. This session’s speaker prompts us to consider how we make those important decisions, how to sustain an ethical workplace, and how to deal with the many pressures to do all things and be all things for our members and the public.”

Thank you for sharing your ideas and stories; I look forward to connecting with you!


First of all, the second half of that title is highly unlikely. I will speak to my titling minions right away.

But what I’m curious about today is: What can you tell me about your blogging successes?

Or at least about your blogging not-disasters?

Why do I ask? Well, later in March I will be delivering a webinar to attendees across the country on the topic of blogging. It’s titled “Top Tips for Bar Bloggers,” and you can read more about it (and even register!) here.

Screenshot of a teaser for my upcoming blogging webinar (yes, I know, they put too many words on the slide).

Screenshot of a teaser for my upcoming blogging webinar (yes, I know, they put too many words on the slide).

Two little boggles about that title:

  1. I definitely should have added a number. You know, “Tim’s 7 Blogging Tips,” or “11 Blogging Tips That Will Make You More Attractive.” After all, we know from SEO and just, y’know, people that folks respond to numerals, and they like to be told there will be a takeaway they can count on.
  2. The other thing about the title: I’m not sure blogging strategy for bars should be any different than blogging strategy for any other niche. It’s about differentiation, writing, and (relatively) compelling content.

That’s why I’d like your thoughts on blogging:

  • Are you a blogger who has a top tip or two?
  • Do you read blogs that seem to “get it” and that serve your needs well? If so, what single thing do you like about those blogs?

If I steal/use one of your ideas, I promise to give you credit in the nationally delivered webinar (I joke about a lot, but never about giving credit for great ideas).

Deal? Deal.

Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

And here is a screen-shot of the registration page. No reason that you too could not register, right here!

NABE webinar on blogging by Tim Eigo 03-2015-page0001

If you’ve read this far, you deserve a treat. Here is a GIF I am expecting to use in my webinar. It’s about the importance of timing in blogs. But moving cats is always a win.

Blog content is important. But your timing is important too. Because cats.

Blog content is important. But your timing is important too. Because cats.

Crowdfunding may work, or could be like finding a pig in a poke.

Crowdfunding may work, or could be like finding a pig in a poke.

Money? On social media? Where?

Tomorrow morning about this time, I’ll face a roomful of association leaders, each eager to hear how their organizations can finally—finally!—make some revenue off this social media thing we’ll all convinced them is worthwhile.

What can go wrong?

The annual meeting of the National Association of Bar Executives (“NABE,” an ABA affiliate) meets in San Francisco this week. I plan to have an Irish coffee at the famed Buena Vista Cafe, sit down with two other talented presenters, and face the challenging questions.

Among us, we have more decades of communications experience than I’d like to admit, and we’re all social media advocates. But when it comes to increasing revenue via social media, we’ll be discussing a topic that is still in serious flux.

For instance, how much do you want your bar association to be increasing non-dues revenue via online channels? Maybe you have no opinion. But maybe the last thing you want is to be “sold” via yet another medium.

Below you’ll see an image of our panel description in the program brochure. And you can click here to read our handout of other resources.

NABE program description on monetizing social mediaOn Thursday morning, after a Kickstarter expert explains that tool, I will discuss challenges bar associations face in monetizing. My three-part presentation is divided into:

  1. Why many people like the idea of monetizing (even when they don’t quite understand it);
  2. What are the many possible missteps inherent in trying to make money online; and
  3. Why, despite my negativity, there may be hope after all to increase revenue.

Word on the street: “Monetize”

In my talk, I get to touch upon:

  • Spiderman
  • Veronica Mars
  • Law students
  • Herd mentality
  • The A-Team
  • Venice Beach
  • CLE
  • Spilled watermelons
  • The Bill of Rights Monument
  • Al Pacino
  • Subway trains
  • The Bar Foundation

Curious, right? Kind of feel bad you can’t be there, eh?

I may report back about what we covered, and how it was received. If you see big honking pop-up ads cluttering my blog in the coming month, you’ll know our message did not get through.

Texas School Book Depository

Dallas building housing the former Texas School Book Depository

First things first. I am in Dallas this week, for the first time ever: Any tips?

A friend from Alabama also will be in the city known to “Live Large. Think Big” (whatever that means), and he made a pretty good suggestion: We should visit the Texas School Book Depository. For some people, that may not ring any bells, but it is the structure in which Lee Harvey Oswald crouched as he fired fatal shots at President John F. Kennedy back in 1963.

The building is still on Dealey Plaza, and the sixth and seventh floors have been converted into a museum commemorating the awful day. Read more about it here.

Yeah, we may be downers. But what history-lover is not?

NABE logoBut because I may find myself with any additional free time, I would appreciate some tourist insight from folks who know this town. Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

On the focused-on-the-conference-front, I will be enjoying quite a bit of learning at the hands of presenters at the NABE midyear conference. And I’m happy to add that I will be one of those presenters. (Thanks again to those who offered suggestions for our panel on social media!)

Jordan Furlong

Jordan Furlong

On Wednesday, just before we present, we’ll have the opportunity to hear from Jordan Furlong. (Follow him on Twitter here.)

Furlong, a Canadian lawyer, is one of a handful of people focused with clear eyes on the future of the legal profession.

I have mentioned Furlong more than once in my blog, but for a real education, head over to his own page. There, you can read his insights on, most recently, legal education. (See posts here and here.)

That’s it for now. I eagerly await your Dallas suggestions!

About a month ago, I wrote about a workshop on social media I will help lead. Thank you to those who provided their general insights about the topic.

cool new facebook features

But now, in a week, is when the rubber hits the social media road. And so I’m asking for your insight again, specifically on the topic of new(-ish) and advanced Facebook features that you appreciate.

That is the topic for which I’ve been tasked at the National Association of Bar Executives, and I am trying to winnow down a list of Facebook fan page features that I think bar associations should consider and maybe adopt.

Here are a few of the features I appreciate on Facebook business pages. Have you used any of them on your personal Facebook page? And would they add to your experience of bar pages?

  • Bigger Facebook profile photos
  • Improved SEO via updated Facebook URLs
  • Better using of the “About” box & “Info” tab
  • Use of “Like” boxes to increase inbound links
  • Incorporating your blog content into Facebook
  • Adding Google Analytics to your Facebook page
  • Posting (more) multimedia on your Facebook pageFacebook Like thumbs up

Of course, it’s possible there are Facebook features you love that have entirely omitted. Let me know what you think.

Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

social media icons

Next February, I’ll be part of a panel communicating all we know for a “Social Media Master Class.” At the moment, I’m feeling vaguely outclassed.

Sure, by February, I plan to have a vast knowledge to impart. But right now, I’d appreciate your insight on what you would expect if you passed by a hotel conference room and spotted the following sign:

“Social Media Advanced Class”

That, essentially, is what we’ll cover in our session.

We will be presenting at the ABA/NABE Midyear Meeting in Dallas, and our audience will be chock full of bar association executives and lawyers.

I didn’t write the copy for the program description, but I am looking for ways to meet its expectations. Here’s what it says:

“If you have not seen the very latest features for Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and other leading social media platforms, you may be living under a rock. Delve into the newest add-ons and enhancements that will bolster your messaging workflow while optimizing your Association’s exposure. Learn how to navigate unexpected (and sometimes unwelcome) redesigns of leading sites. Plus, get recommendations on the best shortcut tools like HootSuite to ease the pains of posting. Whether you’re a seasoned social media junkie or the new kid on the block, you’ll find something valuable to take away.”

social media "map" by Fred Cavazza

I love this social media “map” by Fred Cavazza.

Hmmm. We’d better bring our A game.

I figure one of the best ways to stretch your audience’s knowledge is to stretch your own. That’s why I’ve reached into a few new worlds this past month, to Quora and even Instagram. And I’ve also been examining the old standards (Facebook and Twitter) for what I think are best practices. But Pinterest hasn’t yet sucked me into its vortex.

Later today, I meet (via conference call) will the other panelists (from Ohio, San Francisco, Philadelphia and the District of Columbia). We’ll be strategizing the best way to communicate valuable content to attendees.

Your insights would be appreciated. Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver

Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver

Earlier this week, I shared the magazine’s good news about our national award (press release here). But today is Change of Venue Friday, so we’re on a related but lighter topic: Here are some photos from my trip to Denver (nothing says Change of Venue better than few words, more pics).

I’ve placed a few photos in this blog post; the rest are here, on the Arizona Attorney Facebook page.

But before you head over yonder, you really have to watch a brief video. No, not by me, but by a friend and talented communicator named Patrick Tandy. He’s the Communications Director at the Maryland State Bar Association. Besides all the work that goes into attending a conference (it’s true), Patrick also lugged his iPad around, snapping pictures and capturing the flavor of Denver (and the funky Curtis Hotel).

Patrick teamed up with everyone’s favorite songwriting buddy, Warren Zevon, who provided the appropriate track: “Things To Do in Denver When You’re Dead” (communicators – so so dark).

Enjoy his video, and then go look at my non-videofied photos. Have a great weekend.

By the way, have you Liked the Maryland State Bar on Facebook yet? Whatcha waiting for?

Larimer Street, Denver

Larimer Street, Denver


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