Ernest W McFarland Ariz Archives

Ernest W. McFarland (Ariz. Archives)

Arizona Statehood Day is this weekend, and what better way to celebrate than to honor someone who made an amazing mark on the state.

On Saturday afternoon, Feb. 14, from 2:00 to 3:00, there will be a dedication of the Ernest W. McFarland Memorial and the American Dream Memorial.

The organizers say:

Ernest McFarland

Ernest McFarland

“The public is invited to the unveiling of the new memorial to honor the legacy of ‘Mac’ on Statehood Day. Please join us for a discussion of the McFarland legacy, the symbolism behind the site, and a ceremonial dedication of the memorial to the people of Arizona. Tours will be available immediately following the event. For more information or to RSVP, please call (602) 466-3333.”

The location is Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza, 1700 W. Washington Street, Phoenix AZ 85007.

More information is here. And some great photos of the memorial are here.

Not sure you can quite place McFarland? Consider this opener in Wikipedia, and then re-examine your own life’s achievements!

“Ernest William McFarland (October 9, 1894 – June 8, 1984) was an American politician and, with Warren Atherton, is considered one of the ‘Fathers of the G.I. Bill.’ He is the only Arizonan to serve in the highest office in all three branches of Arizona government—two at the state level, one at the federal level. He was a Democratic Senator from Arizona from 1941 to 1953 (Majority Leader from 1951 to 1953) before serving as the tenth Governor of Arizona from 1955 to 1959. Finally McFarland sat as Chief Justice on the Arizona Supreme Court in 1968.”

Ernest McFarland Memorial artist rendering

Ernest McFarland Memorial artist rendering

The old Phoenix City Hall, still standing, was replaced by a new building in 1994. (Photo: Jarod Opperman for The New York Times)

The old Phoenix City Hall, still standing, was replaced by a new building in 1994. (Photo: Jarod Opperman for The New York Times)

Does Phoenix have any history worth preserving? Over the decades, scores of historic preservation advocates have insisted that Yes, yes it does.

Their tireless work and the fragility of the evocative built environment make a great article in last week’s New York Times all the more appealing. It is titled “Phoenix Rediscovers Historic Face Worth Saving.”

Attorney Mark Briggs is rightly mentioned in it, as he is a member of the city’s Historic Preservation Commission. He is cited along with the civicly-related bond money that supports historic preservation (and which is rapidly running out).

But kudos to the great preservation advocates in Phoenix, some of whom were quoted in the story: Jennifer Boucek (Preserve Phoenix), Alison King (Modern Phoenix) and Will Novak (Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition).

Michelle Dodds, the city’s historic preservation officer, rightly was quoted right at the top.

One speed-bump in the otherwise solid journalism occurs when the passive voice slyly creeps into a paragraph low in the story:

“There have been losses downtown, such as the Hotel St. James, built in 1928, that was demolished, save for its facade and lobby. The boarded-up property is now surrounded by parking spaces.”

It “was demolished,” eh? I’m sure someone mentioned that it was razed pretty recently by the Phoenix Suns, which wanted to make way for (yet) another surface parking lot, this one for its VIP ticketholders. (That demolition and the city’s reaction to it are the source of a lawsuit.)

Hat tip to journalist (and now Harvard student) Eugene Scott for pointing me to the NYT story.

Dick Segal when a student at North Phoenix High School

Dick Segal when a student at North Phoenix High School

Recalling attorneys who have done great things for the community is always a pleasure, and that is what took me to an event back on September 10. In the old Phoenix courthouse, fellow leaders from the Phoenix Community Alliance gathered to remember the achievements of Richard Segal.

He had died suddenly on April 18. (I noted his passing here. And read his obituary here.)

Among other things, Segal was the longtime managing partner of Gust Rosenfeld and former State Bar President. In a historic conference room, though, in an event deftly led by PCA President Don Keuth, folks mainly recalled Dick as a founding officer of the PCA.

Marty Shultz recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

Marty Shultz recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

Marty Shultz reminded listeners of Segal’s calm in the face of chaos. He would routinely “pipe in with a soft voice with the most useful solutions to problems.”

Terry Goddard praised the organization and the man.

Terry Goddard recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

Terry Goddard recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

“PCA’s formation as a triumph of hope over reality,” he said. “Quietly, competently, he kept PCA on track, on mission.”

Hon. Glenn Davis (ret.)  recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

Hon. Glenn Davis (ret.) recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

Retired Judge Glenn Davis praised Segal’s support for the Maricopa County Justice Museum & Learning Center, which shared a floor with the conference room. He urged attendees to view the Legal Hall of Fame display next door, which included Segal, “a lawyer’s lawyer.”

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton recalls Dick Segal, Sept. 10, 2014.

The current Phoenix Mayor, Greg Stanton, estimated that Dick Segal had worked with 13 mayors, “always prodding them toward excellence.”

Dick Segal

Dick Segal

“Dick knew that positive change wasn’t a spectator sport,” Stanton continued. “He was present, always there.”

Mayor Stanton told those assembled that the accumulated value of the legal time given pro bono by Dick and his firm “must run into the 10s of millions of dollars.”

The Mayor also noted that Dick was instrumental in launching the Downtown Phoenix Partnership and in bringing an office of the Local Initiatives Support Corporation to Arizona. He also helped in creating the Human Services Campus near downtown.

“Our city needs more Dick Segals,” the Mayor concluded.

For more information on the gathering and the man, read the Downtown Devil article.

And if you have not visited the Museum, head over there soon. Here are a few images (click to enlarge).

A Flxible tour bus in front of Boston's Verb Hotel tells you something different is going on with this parcel's transformation.

A Flxible tour bus in front of Boston’s Verb Hotel tells you something different is going on with this parcel’s transformation.

“What does a big red bus have to do with adaptive reuse?”

That is how I open my Arizona Attorney column for the October issue (I’ll share the whole thing when it’s online). The bus comment relates to a recently refurbished Boston, Mass., hotel. The larger issue poked at the question of how laws and lawyers can work to make urban spaces more vibrant and dynamic.

One way to achieve adaptive reuse is to alter your laws and your code to encourage (or at least not disincentivize) it. That is something Phoenix has been at work on. You can see a brochure about the city’s own plan here.

Meantime, in Boston, its namesake university has a fascinating piece of journalism on its site that describes the transformation of a main street into what it is today. Once the site of scores of auto dealers and auto-accessories shops, it has become a boulevard welcoming to cars but also to cyclists, pedestrians, and the City’s iconic T subway.

On the site, writer Patrick L. Kennedy explores that street’s transformation. (The site itself is a marvel; click through, at least, to view the brief videos and the sliding-bar effect that lets you view the old and new streetscapes right next to each other.)

One of the fascinating old structures that might have met the wrecking ball in another city is seen below. The building once held an automobile showroom. Now, the BU School of Theatre makes its home there, and it left intact much of the impressive artifacts—one of which are gargoyle-like figures high on the walls that honor mechanics rather than supernatural beings.

Boston University School of Theatre building, once an auto-dealership.

Boston University School of Theatre building, once an auto-dealership.

Yes, that is a mechanic gargoyle in the Stone Gallery. It and many others line the high ceiling in a space now used for education.

Yes, that is a mechanic gargoyle in the Stone Gallery. It and many others line the high ceiling in a space now used for education.

In that magazine column, I was able to share only one image (that very cool decades-old Flxible tour bus, also pictured above). So I thought it would be terrific to share more images here from the Boston adventure. Here are a few more.

Currently, Phoenix seeks to emulate the success of places like Boston that have installed “parklets”—repurposed parking spaces that now accommodate non-car uses. Dozens of cities have already discovered that altering their laws to permit these spaces creates a more vibrant streetscape, which benefits the businesses nearby and adds to residents’ value.

This is just one example of many that businesses have taken when they install public parklets in Boston.

This is just one example of many that businesses have taken when they install public parklets in Boston.

Boston parklets, branded

Boston parklets, branded

A parklet reminder that the space has no predefined use.

A parklet reminder that the space has no predefined use.

The somewhat odd debate is occurring in Phoenix right now as to whether the city should have both public and private parklets. As seen in the images below, Boston’s are public—as are the parklets of 99 percent of the cities out there that have adopted this unique tool. (Is it an Arizona thing to imagine that higher benefits flow from passing public amenities on to the private sector? Hmm.)

In case there was any doubt, signage makes clear that all parklets are public (and not just for a business's customers).

In case there was any doubt, signage makes clear that all parklets are public (and not just for a business’s customers).

Also occupying former car space are wildly successful bike-share stations. They can be found at dozens of places around the city, which makes hopping on—and then off—an easy task.

Boston bike-share occupies space formerly used for cars.

Boston bike-share occupies space formerly used for cars.

Of course, adaptive reuse means businesses often live alongside—or above—residential spaces. This image shows multiple floors of retail and commercial (including below-grade) with residences above.

Business and residential together (and yes, that is Insomnia Cookies in the foreground). Boston streetscape

Business and residential together (and yes, that is Insomnia Cookies in the foreground).

And here is another former auto dealer that now markets bagels and other food through its massive plate-glass windows.

Boston adaptive use streetscape

Boston adaptive use streetscape

Finally, I couldn’t help but notice a former incinerator chute—not removed but left to evoke the past—in a university dorm.

Boston: The impulse to retain the past burns bright. An incinerator chute in a Boston University dorm.

Boston: The impulse to retain the past burns bright. An incinerator chute in a Boston University dorm.

 

Boston incinerator 2_opt closeup

Incinerator label closeup

Do you agree there is value in keeping and adapting the past? If you’re a lawyer involved in that effort, write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Tomorrow, I’ll share another great adaptive reuse—here in Arizona, and with another legal angle.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 President Johnson signs

President Lyndon Johnson signs into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Beginning Friday and continuing through next week, a series of Arizona events marks the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Phoenix events are covered in some detail on a dedicated Facebook page. They include:

  • The unveiling of a commemorative mural, Burton Barr Library, Friday, 10 a.m.
  • Voter registration/civic engagement event, State Capitol lawn, Saturday, 9 a.m.
  • Celebration dinner, First Institutional Baptist Church, Saturday, 5 p.m.
  • Community celebration, Carver Museum and Cultural Center, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 newspaper headlineAs the site describes the legislation:

“The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88–352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation in the United States that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public (known as ‘public accommodations’).”

“Powers given to enforce the act were initially weak, but were supplemented during later years. Congress asserted its authority to legislate under several different parts of the United States Constitution, principally its power to regulate interstate commerce under Article One (section 8), its duty to guarantee all citizens equal protection of the laws under the Fourteenth Amendment and its duty to protect voting rights under the Fifteenth Amendment. The Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964 at the White House.”

historic home Louis Emerson House

Louis Emerson House, Phoenix.

This past month, the Arizona Republic has been engaged in a noble bit of historic preservation: highlighting the most-endangered historic buildings in Phoenix.

Yesterday, the Republic staff featured the Louis Emerson House. As they note, “The Queen Anne/Eastlake style home is one of the few remaining residences in the Evans Churchill neighborhood. The Louis Emerson House has been relocated before to make way for the Arizona Center retail development. It is listed on the Phoenix Historic Property Register.”

I was pleased to see that an attorney, Robert Young, owns the home.

“He believes two occupants lived in the house before 1902, but that is the year Louis Emerson and his wife Clara moved in.”

Young says, “Louis Emerson was a meat cutter for the Palace Meat Market. He used to advertise ‘Meat fit for a king.’” Young said he believes Emerson died in the 1920s. Clara remained in the house until the early 1930s.

That recurring feature got me thinking about other historic structures occupied by lawyers and law firms. Downtowns throughout Arizona are dotted with them, but they may be a declining resource, if the Republic series is to be understood.

Seeing the Emerson House reminded me of a feature story we published in Arizona Attorney back in 2001. It was a pictorial spread of great law offices housed in unique spaces. In that article, we covered and photographed a law office housed just up the street from the Emerson House. It is called the Oldaker House, at 649 North Third Avenue.

You can see the whole story here.

What do you think? Should we revive that feature and locate a new great list of attorney spaces?

Meanwhile, I point out that my Editor’s column that’s about to be mailed includes a contest of sorts. Send me a photo of your law office and/or desk, and I may send you a prize (read the column to find out what). (The whole thing is in the spirit of a previous blog post.)

Looking forward to seeing your space!

A dedication ceremony on Saturday, December 7, will include a wreath-laying and remarks by state historian Marshall Trimble, Rear Admiral Scott Sanders, Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Arizona Secretary of State Ken Bennett.

A dedication ceremony on Saturday, December 7, will include a wreath-laying and remarks by state historian Marshall Trimble, Rear Admiral Scott Sanders, Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Arizona Secretary of State Ken Bennett.

If your December is like mine, your days (especially weekends) are chock-full of events. Not only are we swamped with holiday gatherings, but the (typically) nice weather ensures that Arizonans emerge to revel as much of the rest of the country shovels.

If you can fit it in, an event tomorrow morning (Saturday, December 7) is worth your time. That is when a World War II Memorial is formally dedicated on the grounds of the state Capitol.

Sited on the Wesley Bolin Plaza, the new installation is comprised of gun barrels of the U.S.S. Arizona and U.S.S. Missouri, as well as installations honoring Arizona veterans.

A website tells more about the Memorial and the events surrounding it.

Leading the dedication of the site called “Guns to Salute the Fallen” will be Secretary of State Ken Bennett.

Here is a description of the efforts via Secretary Bennett’s office:

“For nearly three years, the Secretary has spearheaded the effort to build a complete WWII Memorial in Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza. Hundreds of individuals and companies in Arizona including Phoenix Rotary 100, SDB Contracting Services, Marco Crane & Rigging and BNSF Railways donated thousands of dollars in cash and in-kind services to build the memorial which features the names of Arizona’s WWII soldiers who died and historic gun barrels from the USS Arizona and USS Missouri.”

“Saturday’s events include the formal dedication ceremony which begins at 9:45 a.m. and is preceded by a DPS escorted commemorative motorcycle ride finishing at the plaza. More than 1000 riders plan to attend. The riders will be greeted by The Saluting Marine, Staff Sgt. Tim Chambers.”

Their office predicts that thousands of people will attend. So keep this in mind: Bring a lawn chair, as the only reserved seating /parking will be for WWII veterans.

Here is a complete listing of events:

  • 7:48 a.m. Run to the Guns departs EagleRiders, 1000 N. McClintock Drive, Tempe
  • 8:30 a.m. Run to the Guns arrives state capitol complex
  • 9:00 a.m. Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community Flag is installed in a case in the Relic Room of the USS Arizona.
  • 9:45 a.m. WWII Memorial Dedication & Pearl Harbor Day Remembrance Ceremony begins
  • *9:50 a.m. Arizona Capitol Museum will play a live feed of the Pearl Harbor Observance from Hawaii
  • 10:55 a.m. B-17 Flyover by CAF (Commemorative Air Force, Airbase Arizona)
  • 11:45 a.m. Approximate end of ceremony
  • 1:00 p.m. American Concert & BBQ in celebration of the WWII Memorial and fundraiser for veterans, featuring Jimmie Van Zant of Lynyrd Skynyrd – 1000 N. McClintock, Tempe

Some maps will help you get there (and park); click to enlarge them. Have a wonderful weekend.

AZ WWII Memorial Parking DirectionsAZ WWII Memorial LARGE EVENT MAPAZ WWII Memorial designated parking areas

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