Abogados a Su Lado on immigration 03-01-17

Attorneys assist at Abogados a Su Lado phone bank, March 1, 2017.

News from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez:

The State Bar of Arizona and Univision Arizona hosted the first Abogados a Su Lado (attorneys on your side) phone bank of the year on Wednesday, March 1, 2017. This access to justice program was held to help the immigrant community understand the impact of the President’s Executive Orders.

The Bar’s role as a partner and organizer of the phone bank was to help the immigrant community connect with licensed attorneys for sound legal advice. The immigrant community is often victimized by notarios and document preparers during high-profile activity associated with immigration law.

The phone bank on immigration law was held on Wednesday, March 1, from 5:00 to 10:30 p.m.

sba_logo_color State Bar of ArizonaThere were nine volunteer attorneys:

  • Marisol Angulo, Hernandez Global
  • Emilia Banuelos, Banuelos Law Office
  • Vanessa Black, Vanessa Black Law Immigration Law Firm
  • Joshua De La Ossa, De La Ossa & Ramos
  • Seth B. Draper, Salvatierra Law Group
  • Judy Flanagan, Judy C. Flanagan, PC
  • Ayensa Millan, CIMA Law Group
  • Edwin G. Ramos, De La Ossa & Ramos
  • Javier Sobampo, Sobampo Law Firm

Volunteer attorneys answered 381 calls regarding immigrant rights and changes in immigration law during the five-and-a-half-hour phone bank.

We thank the attorneys as well as Univision Arizona for its continued partnership in providing this valuable program for the Spanish-speaking community. We also thank the volunteers from Mi Familia Vota who helped with event logistics.

State Bar of Arizona logo

The worst award is the one that goes ungiven, and with that in mind, you should consider who in your circle may deserve to be honored with an award by the State Bar.

Nominations for the 2017 awards are now being accepted through March 22, 2017 at 5 p.m. That’s tomorrow. Giddyup.

You can read a list of the awards here. That page also includes detail on the day they will be presented, a description of each and a list of previous recipients by year.

New this year is a State Bar of Arizona Award Nomination form, click here. Use that form for each nomination, along with any supporting nominations.

Here are photos of the three attorneys who were honored in 2016 as Members of the Year.

Ides of March Julius Caesar magazine sign

Why, yes, I do change my meeting sign every month. Doesn’t everybody?

Why, yes, today is the Ides of March. And I’m hoping no one is standing behind me.

That was one of my thoughts as I selected an image for the sign indicating our monthly meeting of the Arizona Attorney Editorial Board (see above). Many of the members found it funny—others simply raised their eyebrows, as lawyers can do.

But what turned out poorly for Julius Caesar on March 15 ended up yielding one of my briefer—and most favorite—blog posts ever.

godfather
That’s because it combined Caesar, regal intrigue, murder most foul, and the blockbuster movie Godfather, which was released on this day in 1972.

You can read that piece from way back in 2013 here. It still makes me chuckle. But then again, I’m easily amused.

Good luck getting through an unlucky day. Here’s to classical history and great films.

Society of Professional Journalists - Valley of the Sun chapter - Phoenix, Arizona

From the University of Arizona School of Journalism in a March 9 post on Facebook: “Need help in spotting ‘fake news’ and judging sources? Check out this new guide put together by Mary Feeney and University of Arizona Libraries.”

The UA libraries have created an online guide to spotting fake news, or hoax news. Several reliable, helpful resources for news consumers are provided, including a helpful 3 minute, 22 second video from FactCheck.org called “How to Spot Fake News.”

Here’s the information on the libraries’ website.

View original post

Daily 5 logo.jpg

Since November 1, the Arizona Attorney Magazine staff have been writing a new newsletter for a new generation of newsletter readers. Sent by email every afternoon, the Daily 5 offers 4 news stories + 1 case of the day.

You can get through that content in about 5 minutes–10 if you’re really enjoying yourself.

I wrote about the Daily 5 in my February editor’s column, which I share again today:

You probably think you’re reading a magazine right now. And of course you’re right. But that’s only part of the picture. Because what you’re truly reading is a concept, an idea with personality, that has formed over decades. Arizona Attorney is a magazine, but it’s also a way of thinking and—dare I say it—a brand.

A brand that grew a little bit this fall.

Over the past 18 months, we decided to take that voice—that brand—into another channel. You may already be familiar with what we do in social media (for example, on Twitter @azatty, yo). But we wondered: How could that approach to the legal world play out in a daily newsletter?

So in November, after laying a year’s worth of groundwork, we launched the Arizona Attorney Daily 5.

5 news headlines a day, snappy writing, great design, all emailed once a day to readers. How hard can that be?

Daily 5 praise on FB cropped.jpg

When a Facebook message makes an Editor’s day.

 

Pretty hard, it turns out. But where the Daily 5 has succeeded, it has done so for a few reasons. Let me offer, well, 5 of them.

Voice matters: Arizona Attorney may be a legal publication, but we’re no law journal. We believe that in the life of every practicing attorney there’s room for humor and a lighter outlook. The Daily 5 is your informative colleague at the 5-minute water-cooler break.

Story choice matters: Yes, we offer substantive summaries of court opinions. But we think you enjoy some articles that require lighter lifting, too. Cue the Kardashians’ legal struggles.

Writing matters: Even if our choices are solid, readers will flee if the writing comes from the 19th century. Our tone and approach show we are not your grandfather’s newsletter.

Knowing your audience matters: We’ve spent decades-plus interacting with Arizona lawyers. Since November, we’ve heard from a large number of readers who appreciate our lighter touch and our lively writing. Is everyone a fan? No, but we do what we can to win them over.

Colleagues matter: Each Daily 5 contains about 500 words, 600 max. But that sparseness masks the input of so many people. From having the newsletter’s title contest-crowdsourced among State Bar staff, to an elegant logo designed by our Art Director, to all the writing and curating done in-house, to the ad sales that make the newsletter smart and profitable, this is a capital-T Team effort. Kudos to everyone involved.

We do enjoy hearing your thoughts about our daily work. Send praise, critiques and suggestions to us at Daily5@azbar.org. And yes, we’ll write back.

election-ahead-road-sign-375x250

State Bar Governors sought for two Districts.

The State Bar of Arizona calls for candidates to apply for a position on its governing board, the Board of Governors. Complete packets are due to the Bar by tomorrow, Tuesday, February 28, at 5:00 p.m.

Openings exist in two counties/Bar districts. There are nine openings in Maricopa County (District 6), and one opening in Pinal County (District 8).

State Bar of Arizona logo
Among the interesting aspects to this election:

  • For the first time ever, out-of-state members can vote (in the District of their most recent Arizona residence or place of business or, if none, in Bar District 6/Maricopa County).
  • Terms for those prevailing in this election will be for two years. Although Board terms are typically three years, in 2019 the Board of Governors faces a “reset,” required by an Arizona Supreme Court change to Rule 32, Ariz.R.S.Ct., which will result in a recomposition of the Board and staggered terms for members.

More information on the process and required documents for the nomination packet are here.

If you have any questions about nominations or the election process, contact Carrie Sherman at 602-340-7201 or at Carrie.Sherman@staff.azbar.org.

In partnership with the Florence Project, The Rogue Trio will perform February 24 at ASU's Katzin Hall.

In partnership with the Florence Project, The Rogue Trio will perform February 24 at ASU’s Katzin Hall.

This month’s headlines were filled with developments regarding immigration law and significant changes that are proposed for its enforcement.

If you’re seeking a very creative way to be imbued with the immigrant experience, an event this Friday night at ASU may be the (free) ticket—or the boleto, if you’d prefer.

Florence Project logo 25 years

As organizers describe it: For one night only, The Rogue Trio partners with the Florence Project to create a unique musical experience, featuring testimony of Florence Project clients. Making his southwest debut, composer Ralph Lewis takes powerful testimony of immigrants detained in Arizona and combines their accounts with live and electroacoustic music for a moving musical juxtaposition that brings hope amongst fear.

Did you catch that? Migrant testimony in combination with music.

florence-project-rogue-trio-immigration-music-event

The performance will be held at Arizona State University’s Katzin Hall on Friday, February 24, at 7:30 p.m. Doors will open at 7:15 p.m., and admission is free. Parking information can be found here. If you have any questions, reach out to Greer Millard at gmillard@firrp.org or 602-795-7407. More information on the The Rogue Trio is here.

And who are The Rogue Trio? They are: Justin Rollefson on saxophones, Kathleen Strahm on violin, and Mary Strobel-Price on piano. They describe their work as “a contemporary chamber ensemble that explores the diverse color palate of an unconventional assortment of instruments.” Color me interested. You can visit their website here, and find them on Facebook here.

Meantime, in other legal news related to the high-profile nature of immigration cases today, here’s an ABA Journal article about a website that connects volunteer lawyers with travelers affected by the immigration ban.

As ABA Journal reporter Debra Cassens Weiss writes, “Airport Lawyer allows users to input information about people targeted by the ban who are traveling to the United States—whether it’s the user, a friend or family member. The information can be shared with lawyers who can be available at the airport to monitor arrivals. … A list of the airports where volunteer lawyers are available through the app is here.”

airport-lawyer-website-connects-volunteer-lawyers-with-travelers-affected-by-immigration-ban