Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor

Today I will happily be leading a webinar on the topic of blogging. So there may be no better day than this to share news from an event last week. That annual event, coincidentally, was the subject of my first legal blog post more than five years ago. (I know; you’re tearing up along with me.)

The Learned Hand luncheon continues to wow a packed room at the Hyatt Phoenix with its awards to smart legal luminaries. And the magic of the event continues to be the stellar speeches, not only be the worthy recipients, but also by their nominators. These folks bring it.

This year’s event was last Wednesday, March 11, and as always it is sponsored by the American Jewish Committee’s Arizona Chapter.

AJC American Jewish Committee logoThis year’s honorees were Lawrence Robinson, Elliot Glicksman, and retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. (I know; what took them so long?!)

I won’t go on about each of the honoree’s accomplishments. All of the folks were well selected, and, as always, the acceptance speeches were matched by the nominators’ speeches for verve and punch.

The luncheon provides attendees a moment to pause and hear from esteemed peers. As those lawyers and judges, we recall the best ideals of our profession. I’m confident that as listeners stream out onto the busy sidewalk, full from a salmon lunch, they are at least briefly refreshed as they head back to work. Ideally, the lessons they heard will take root and bear fruit in their own lives.

And if you have a moment, <strong>here is what I wrote five years ago, on the occasion of the same lunch in 2010 (when the honorees were Keri Lazarus Silvyn, E.G. “Ted” Noyes, Jr., and Debbie Hill).

judge roxanne song ong headshot

Judge Roxanne Song Ong (ret.)

This Thursday, the annual event called Spring Training for Lawyers will be held. (I mentioned it yesterday, here.)

There is quite a bit of content worth seeing at the event this Thursday and Friday. Topics include (in no particular order) stereotyping, the Hobby Lobby decision, representing clients with disabilities, mindfulness in practice, and immigration law.

Every one of those (plus others) look like great panels helmed by talented lawyers.

But the opening panel on Thursday is the one I really am disappointed to miss. The title is “Perspectives on Diversity in the Legal Profession in Arizona, and it runs from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

The speakers have walked the walk:

  • George Chen, partner at Bryan Cave
  • Booker Evans, shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy
  • Sonia Martinez, solo practitioner and past President of NABA
  • Ed Maldonado, solo practitioner and past President of Los Abogados
  • Hon. Roxanne Song Ong, retired Presiding Judge of the Phoenix Municipal Court

Topics will include:

  • Challenges facing minority attorneys in the workplace
  • Issues of majority attorneys working with minority lawyers
  • Importance of developing business for minority lawyers

As organizers say, “A full hour is also dedicated for the panelists to interact with the audience, who are encouraged to ask the ‘tough questions’ about minority issues. The panelists will do their best to provide their candid answers.”

More information is here, including the full program, fees (regular, late, and student discount), additional registration and CLE information.

Register here.

Spring Training for Lawyers Minority Bar Convention 2015-page0001

Spring Training for Lawyers Minority Bar Convention 2015-page0001A very short item this morning to remind you of one of my favorite conferences of the year. It’s called Spring Training for Lawyers (formerly the Minority Bar Conference), and it occurs this Thursday and Friday, March 19 and 20. I enjoy it for multiple reasons.

If you go, I hope you’ll agree that the speaker panels and plenaries are above average. The location (Desert Willow Conference Center) is also a great venue.

Later this week, I’ll share more detail about a session I think you’d enjoy. (Unfortunately, I can only attend on Friday this week.)

The complete program is here.

A Contessa never looked so sweet (or clacked so loudly). typewriter

A Contessa never looked so sweet (or clacked so loudly).

Who doesn’t love a typewriter?

Well, the world, apparently. As a whole, things may look bad for this most useful of tools.

But as individuals, many of us maintain a soft spot in our hearts for the clatter of the lettered keys. For in a digital world, it’s a blast to recall how much we once actually used our digits in a tactile way.

I got to thinking about that in February when I read a terrific essay titled “The Last of the Typewriter Men.” It tells the tale of New Yorker Paul Schweitzer and his everyday battle to help ever-older typewriters to function well.

On this Change of Venue Friday, I wonder if you, like me, still have a typewriter around the home or office.

I still hear from folks that an IBM Selectric is kept handy for the occasional envelope. Having struggled to feed an individual envelope through a printer/copier, or to waste a sheet of labels to print one label, I will cast no stones on that vintage approach; they may be on to something.

In our own home, we have an old typewriter, though it is not the one I used throughout college and grad school (that was a bright-orange Contessa, which looked identical to the one I posted above).

At home—and purely so our daughters could try their hand at the faded-away technology—we have a vintage Royal. Here it is:

Our Royal typewriter at home

Our Royal typewriter at home

Well, when you have a typewriter, you end up knowing one of the remaining typewriter men (or women). And ours happens to be in Mesa, at the Mesa Typewriter Exchange.

Bill Wahl (the “man”) won a Phoenix New Times Best Place to Find a Typewriter a few years back. (I don’t think they’ve included the category since, or I’m sure he’d sweep it.)

If you’re ever in need of a vintage machine, or to have your own repaired, he’s at 30 S. MacDonald St., Mesa, AZ 85210 (480-964-3603).

You may already know Bill’s work from a few news programs over the years. Here, enjoy watching Robin Sewell’s interview with Bill for Arizona Highways TV:

And here you’ll find a few more stories about the Mesa store, via CBS Sunday Morning News and NBC Nightly News.

Have a great—and finger-exercising—weekend.

Hand-crafted audiotapes may teach us a lesson worth remembering.

Hand-crafted audiotapes may teach us a lesson worth remembering.

Where can I get some colorful examples of audiocassette liner notes—like the ones we used to create for friends and others?

Why do I ask? Well, this Friday, I’ll address a banquet hall filled with legal leaders. The Chicago event is the Bar Leadership Institute of the American Bar Association. I was privileged to speak last year on the topic of written communication (primarily how bar presidents can increase their engagement and effectiveness in their presidents’ column, whether in print or online).

This week, my ABA-assigned topic is broader: strategic communication (the program is here). After my remarks, I’ll be joined by three smart communicators from bars around the country, who will speak on communication in print, online, and in person.

So why was I searching online for images of cassette liner notes? (That’s right; cassettes, created in about 1962.)

Well, among the messages I’ll impart has to do with the way all of us want to consume information today. Among the many items I read and watched to prepare my 30-minute presentation, one by Don MacKinnon stood out. He explained what had occurred in the music industry, and how listener interests had led to the downfall of the one-size-fits-all album. And not only have we begun to yearn for the mixtape again in music; we can see the same in various kinds of entertainment.

If in entertainment, why not in law, I wondered? Many of the people I’ll speak to on Friday can recall the heyday of associations. That’s when they controlled most of the means of production, in print and in professional education. It’s when competitors such as podcasts, apps, and downloads didn’t exist. It’s when—kind of—bar associations were record producers. And when we dropped a new album, we could be assured our audience would consume it. The lifting on the part of bars was pretty light.

That’s all changed, of course, and our audience wants a mixtape. That is, they want to curate great content from multiple sources. Smart associations will still be part of that mix, but we’re no longer the only game in town.

mixtape 2 disco mix

So my liner-note search was for some punchy visuals, as well as to serve as a model for my conference handout (a list of additional reading).

I’ll report back on how it all went (maybe I’ll even Slideshare my Powerpoint). And if things go well, I may have an audience selfie to share with you. What’s more mixtape than that?

ASU Law Sports and Business Law_conference_header_2015

In past years, I have attended and covered sports law events at the ASU Law School (read here and here, for instance). In what appears to be a departure from previous events hosted by a student association, this year’s March 12 and 13 event is touted as the university’s “inaugural Sports Law and Business Conference.” ASU describes it as covering “issues affecting the future of professional and amateur sports.”

(The event, formerly student-run, had been hosted by the aptly named Sports and Entertainment Law Students Association. Entertainment topics are not specifically mentioned in this year’s agenda.)

The school continues:

“The Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, the W. P. Carey School of Business, and the Department of Athletics are presenting the conference. It will take place at the Ed and Nadine Carson Student Athletic Center on the Arizona State University Tempe Campus. The conference will examine the regulatory, revenue and reputational concerns within the sports industry. Day one will focus on intercollegiate sports, with day two concentrating on professional sports.”

Sports, business and legal leaders slated to speak include:

  • Craig Tindall, General Counsel, Arizona Coyotes
  • Nona Lee, General Counsel, Arizona Diamondbacks
  • Melissa Goldenberg, General Counsel, Phoenix SunsTony Dungy, NBC Sports Analyst, New York Times Bestselling Author, former NFL coach
  • Oliver Luck, Executive Vice President for Regulatory Affairs, NCAA
  • Scott Bearby, General Counsel, NCAA
  • Donna Lopiano, President and Founder, Sports Management Resources

The March 12-13 event will be held at the Student Athlete Center at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm both days.

More information is available in a university press release.

And you can register here.

AZ Summit Law School Phoenix Law logoSome news from the folks at Arizona Summit Law School (please feel free to pass it on to people who could benefit):

Arizona Summit Law School, a private law school located in downtown Phoenix, is hosting a one-day event to provide free legal information and limited-scope legal advice and assistance to people seeking help on matters related to family law, general business, probate and estate planning, and landlord/tenant disputes.

Susan Daicoff, director of legal clinics at Summit Law

Susan Daicoff, director of legal clinics at Summit Law

Approximately 50 Summit Law students, faculty, and alumni will be providing pro bono legal services; each student will be supervised by faculty or alumni who are practicing attorneys.  The school hopes to assist as many individuals as possible during its first Access to Justice Day.

“As we enter our tenth year, Arizona Summit Law School is excited to expand its work within our community,” said Susan Daicoff, director of legal clinics at Summit Law. “While our clinics have helped many clients over the years, from family law to our work at the Human Services Campus, this free day of legal assistance allows more of us to come together as a law school, to serve more people in our community who may not be able to afford legal advice.”

When: Friday, March 13, 2015, 10 am – 2 pm

Where: Arizona Summit Law School, 1 North Central Ave. in downtown Phoenix

Check-in will be held in the school’s lobby area where a pre-screening occurs. Individuals will then be guided to the appropriate station.

Spanish-speaking translators will be available.

Dean Shirley Mays Arizona Summit Law School

Dean Shirley Mays, Arizona Summit Law School

Individuals seeking assistance with complex issues requiring more than a short consultation will be referred to appropriate lawyers and organizations, including legal services agencies (community organizations who offer free or reduced-cost legal assistance), local attorneys, and Summit Law alumni.

“One of the pillars of our mission here at Summit Law is to serve the underserved,” said Arizona Summit Law Dean Shirley Mays. “For us, that means more than our efforts to diversify the legal profession by creating more opportunities for women and people of color to obtain a high quality legal education. That also means expanding our efforts to provide high quality legal information and advice to those in the community who might not otherwise have the financial circumstances to meet with a legal professional.”

For questions related to parking, directions or how the event will be structured, email Probono@azsummitlaw.edu. Note: No legal advice will be provided through this email address, and no information or legal matters will be reviewed in advance.

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