Change of Venue

lawyer fear aba journal

Managing fear is simply part of a person’s life, experts say.

As we enter the most joyous—and most pressure-filled—time of the year, I hear from a lot of attorneys that their stress levels are reaching peak levels. As the end of the calendar year races toward us, so do obligations and deadlines, professional and personal.

To help counter that, today I share an ABA Journal article titled “How Lawyers Can Turn Fear Into an Ally.”

The piece by Kevin Davis includes these eye-opening sentences:

“Lawyers often are imprisoned by fear. They’re fearful that their cases are out of control. They’re fearful of looking foolish. They’re fearful of negotiating. They’re fearful of appearing weak. Even continuing legal education courses can contribute by making lawyers fear that they are not up to date on current practices or wary of the myriad number of things that can go wrong.”

Among the resources cited by Davis is a piece by John Lande titled “Escaping from Lawyers’ Prison of Fear.” It’s worth a look.

I previously shared a guest post by John, who is a law professor emeritus at the University of Missouri School of Law.

John Lande

John Lande

Here’s hoping these resources, and others, can keep the holiday fears at bay.

Richard Fried

Richard Fried

“How A Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can Improve the Lives of Victims” is the subject of a public lecture tomorrow at the University of Arizona law school. Attorney Richard Fried will deliver the lecture, which is part of the school’s Civil Justice Initiative.

Here is more detail from the school:

“As part of our annual Civil Justice lecture series, University of Arizona Law welcomes Richard Fried for a community presentation on trial practice and plaintiff’s representation. He will be speaking on How A Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can Improve the Lives of Victims. Reception to follow.

When: Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, 5-6:30 p.m.

Where: University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, Room 160, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd.

Who may attend: This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP here.

“L. Richard Fried, Jr. is one of the founding members of Cronin, Fried, Sekiya, Kekina & Fairbanks and has practiced law for over 40 years. Rick has a national reputation in the fields of medical malpractice—having obtained 50 verdicts and settlements in excess of $1 million—and aviation law. He served as President of the Hawaii Association for Justice (formerly the Consumer Lawyers of Hawaii) in 1984 and 2001, and was the recipient of their first trial lawyer of the year award in 1994.”

“He was appointed by the Chief Justice of the Hawaii State Supreme Court to serve on the Judicial Evaluation Committee for the State of Hawaii and the Chief Judge of the Hawaii Federal District Court to serve as a delegate to the federal district judges conference.”

“In July 2015, he was named as Chairman of the Hawaii Tourism Authority, where he has served on the Board of Directors since 2012. He has also served on the boards of local organizations such as the Honolulu Symphony, Hawaii Theatre, and the American Civil Liberties Union.”

“The Civil Justice Initiative aims to help Arizona Law elevate the American civil justice system and become the premier destination for educating trial lawyers. A hallmark of the CJI is the annual Civil Justice lecture series, showcasing leading advocates to the student body and the legal community. Past distinguished lecturers include Tom Girardi and Pat McGroder.”

The lying-down desk eases your work and smooths our national path to a less-impressive future.

The lying-down desk eases your work and smooths our national path to a less-impressive future.

It’s Change of Venue Friday, so I recline in comfort as I draft this easygoing piece.

Unfortunately, my laptop is perched uncomfortably on my lap, and my heels rest painfully on the sharp edge of a tabletop. While I muse that this may be the very definition of “First World Problems,” furniture engineers (yes, it’s a thing) toil to answer the question, “How can we end this long dark chapter in human history?”

Did someone say “lying down desk”?

Yes, they did, America. In fact, more and more folks are talking about this new product from Altwork. Even the ABA Journal took note of this reclining wonder. Because lawyers need to take a load off.

Lying down is not just for science-fiction heroes, Altwork says. Everyone can recline.

Lying down is not just for science-fiction heroes, Altwork says. Everyone can recline.

But who would use such a thing—and how does it work?

As Mashable tells us,

“This workstation is being marketed towards programmers, designers, writers and anyone else who uses a computer as their primary working tool. The Altwork Station offers four modes, all configurable with buttons on the desk surface; standing, collaboration, regular and focus. Standing and regular are exactly what you’d expect and collaboration is simply turning your monitor on the built in arm to work with others. Focus mode is where it gets interesting though, as that’s where you can recline the chair to be completely horizontal, with the desk and monitor following suit.”

Read more about the $5,900 chair here.

Yes, I say fifty-nine hundred dollars. But the more I read about it, the more I’m horrified and convinced I should have one. O, comfortable efficiency, you are an attractive siren!

At home, this is what I thought a work chair looked like. (And this one was used in the filming of feature film "Durant's Never Closes"!)

At home, this is what I thought a work chair looked like. (And this one was used in the filming of feature film “Durant’s Never Closes”!)

And if you need to know more (as you decide whether I should be gifted a better writing set-up than my current one), here is a video describing the whole dealio.

Have a wonderful—and topsy-turvy—weekend.

Quarles & Brady folks at Capitol School, Oct. 30, 2015.

Quarles & Brady folks at Capitol School, Oct. 30, 2015.

News from the Phoenix office of Quarles & Brady:

On Friday, Oct. 30, nearly two dozen members of Quarles & Brady’s Phoenix office joined together to volunteer their time as “homeroom parents” at the Capitol School’s annual Fall Celebration. This was the first of three events during the 2015–2016 school year in which attorneys and staff will volunteer their team to the Capitol School, just west of downtown Phoenix, providing both treats and interactive activities to engage students from Kindergarten to sixth grade.

“Capitol Elementary School strives to create a healthy learning environment where students are given a quality education that includes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become lifelong learners and responsible citizens—we respect that and want to do everything we can to help,” said Scott Jenkins, a partner in the Phoenix office who even brought his own children to volunteer with the team. “In addition to rolling up our sleeves with the kids, the firm also fundraises to support and put on special school events, including field trips to Boston and Washington, D.C.”

According to Jenkins, partnership between Quarles & Brady and the Capitol School dates back a quarter century.

“In 1990, Quarles & Brady set out to find a community project that would provide sustainable, ongoing volunteerism to bring their firm members together with purpose beyond business,” said Jenkins. “With so many parents and grandparents working at the firm, focusing on children and education was a priority.”

While the Capitol School program kicked off with the attorneys and staff putting on homeroom class parties, the partnership quickly evolved into one that included reading and writing assistance, mentorship, fundraising, financial support to students’ families when in crisis, and even a donation to help remodel the school’s media center.

This effort is one of many the local office takes part in through its Quarles Cares community relations program, which is focused on connecting directly with local communities to understand the residents’ needs. Through the volunteer initiatives, attorneys and staff commit themselves personally to civic and charitable efforts, and their personal growth is reflected in the workplace. More information is here.

Tile mural dedicated by Capitol School to Quarles & Brady.

Tile mural dedicated by Capitol School to Quarles & Brady.

Arizona Supreme Court building

A new Arizona Justice will be appointed by Gov. Doug Ducey. Applicant interviews will be held on Nov. 20, 2015.

Note: The following post was edited to reflect changes announced by the Arizona Supreme Court at 9:40 a.m. The changes indicate that the judicial-applicant interviews will be taped and posted later, but not streamed live. The Court announced, “We reviewed how interviews were done in the past and we have not previously simulcast/webcast the interviews.  A decision was made to be consistent with previous interviews.” The interviews will still be open to the public.

The Arizona Supreme Court has announced that on this Friday, November 20, interviews for applicants for a vacant Justice position will be held and be open to the public, beginning at 8:00 a.m.

The interviews will also be taped, recorded, and then posted in their entirety later on the Court’s website. The Court anticipates posting all the video by 5:00 p.m. the same day.

The nine individuals to be interviewed in the public meeting were selected by the Arizona Commission on Appellate Court Appointments. At the end of the meeting, the Commission members will vote on a slate of at least three nominees to send to Gov. Doug Ducey, who will be making his first appointment to the Arizona Supreme Court.

Arizona_Supreme_Court_SealI provided the list of applicants previously here.

The Court has posted each individual’s application on its website. The agenda for the meeting is here. “As noted on the agenda, there may be executive sessions before and after the public interviews. Interviews will be 30 minutes long and will be taped and available for viewing by 5:00 p.m. on November 20. The landing page for our webcast and archived videos is here.”


A recent Phoenix conference examined difficult questions about concussions and what should be done about them.

A recent Phoenix conference examined difficult questions about concussions and what should be done about them.

What are the legal and ethical implications that face society as we learn more about the brain and the corrosive effects of concussions?

On Friday, I had the good fortune to catch the final hour of an all-day conference committed to that and other important questions. That hour was the conference’s capstone and featured a panel Q&A moderated by legal star Arthur R. Miller, a law professor at NYU. I may write about that panel in an upcoming Arizona Attorney Magazine.

safeguarding brains ASU conference 11-13-15

In the meantime, I share an editorial that ran in Friday’s Arizona Republic. In “Ending the Concussion Epidemic,” conference organizers Betsy Grey and Gary Marchant, both professors with the Center for Law, Science & Innovation at ASU Law, offer valuable insight. Let’s hope conferences and articles like this help legal and government leaders make good choices.

(And it’s worth noting that Gary Marchant wrote for us before, on personalized medicine and the law.)

It's hard to resist redesigning even great subway maps. Here is the Washington, DC, system, via one designer's vision.

It’s hard to resist redesigning even great subway maps. Here is the Washington, DC, system, via one designer’s vision.

There’s something about the incredible imagination that goes into mass transit that makes the whole thing fascinating and impressive.

What I mean is, just consider the wide variety of tools needed to conceptualize how to move large numbers of individuals across large distances with the least amount of disruption. That is simply impressive and even evocative.

That evocative nature extends even—or maybe necessarily—to the transit maps of many cities. I hope you agree that “subway map” could be its own artistic niche, so impressive are many of them.

That’s why on this Change of Venue Friday I invite you to read this article about how people simply cannot resist tweaking and transforming the subway map. As Emily Badger writes in the Washington Post, the need to reinvent is a powerful one.

Subway map of Tokyo.

Subway map of Tokyo.

Among the real and imagined maps the article displays, which are your favorites? As for me, it’s hard not to smile when you see the imagined map for Madrid, Spain.

Madrid's subway map, reimagined.

Madrid’s subway map, reimagined.

And in case there was not enough evidence that people love their subway systems, here is a brief story sharing “the best subway map tattoos.” Yes, it’s a thing.

Skin in the game: The Seoul subway map, via tattoo.

Skin in the game: The Seoul subway map, via tattoo.

Have a terrific—and track-inspired—weekend.

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