Change of Venue


Richard Saldivar, principal of TERIS for Arizona and Texas (center), with Ernie Ortiz, food drive manager, St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance (left), and Beverly Damore, president and CEO, St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance, in the inaugural Object to Hunger Food Drive in 2013.

Richard Saldivar, principal of TERIS for Arizona and Texas (center), with Ernie Ortiz, food drive manager, St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance (left), and Beverly Damore, president and CEO, St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance, in the inaugural Object to Hunger Food Drive in 2013.

The St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance will be the recipient of food and cash donations made by law firms during Hunger Action Month. The “Object to Hunger” food drive is in its third year, sponsored by TERIS, a litigation support services firm with offices in Phoenix and Austin, Texas.

ipro logoCo-sponsoring this year’s drive are the Document Control Group of Ryley Carlock & Applewhite in Phoenix and Ipro Tech LLC legal-software firm in Tempe.

Law firms and law offices are invited to participate in the “friendly competition” from September 7 to September 25.

Ryley Carlock DCG Document Control Group logo

Firms can sign up here or email phxadmin@teris.com.

And here is more detail from the sponsor’s press release:

TERIS logo“Community service is a core value of TERIS, and we are impressed by the Phoenix legal community’s participation in ‘Object to Hunger,’ ” said Richard Saldivar, Arizona/Texas principal of TERIS. “Their enthusiasm for this project is inspiring, and we at TERIS are proud to help them tackle the important issue of fighting hunger in our state.”

TERIS’s Phoenix office launched the “Object to Hunger” Food Drive in fall of 2013 to benefit Phoenix-based St. Mary’s Food Bank, the world’s first food bank and one of the largest in the United States. In its first two years, “Object to Hunger” raised more than 114,000 meals during what is normally a slow time of year for much-needed donations to the food bank.

This year’s competition aims to enlist at least 60 law firms in contributing at least 100,000 meals. Based on their levels of contributions, teams can earn one of four levels of “partner status” in the campaign. Winners will be chosen in two categories: most meals overall, and most meals per capita (based on the size of the company or firm.) Winners’ names will be engraved on a trophy.

Last year’s winners were the Phoenix law firm of Jones, Skelton & Hochuli for most meals overall; Frutkin Law Firm of Phoenix for most meals per capita; and Helene Fenlon PLC of Scottsdale for most meals per capita individual.

Every pound of food donated to St. Mary’s equals one meal that the food bank can distribute, and every dollar donated enables it to distribute seven meals. Items most needed for the food drive are beans; canned fruit and vegetables; canned soups, stews and chili; cereal; juice; pasta; peanut butter; rice and tuna. Other commonly needed items are diapers, household paper supplies, soap, shampoo and toothpaste.

To join the “Object to Hunger” campaign, request food donation boxes or make monetary contributions, law firms may contact Jolie Pauls of TERIS at 602-241-9333 or phxadmin@teris.com.

The owl of the Superb Owl Night Run with co-organizers Tricia Schafer (left) and Johnny Lookabaugh (right).

The owl of the Superb Owl Night Run with co-organizers Tricia Schafer (left) and Johnny Lookabaugh (right).

You may recall how back in January I predicted a particular legal outcome. A recent contrary result demonstrates why writing rather than lawyer-predicting was a better career course-correction for me.

Back in January, I chuckled over an annual fundraising race called the Superb Owl. Hosted around the time of the Super Bowl, the organizers—and I—thought the charming diction would help the Owl fly beneath the radar of The Big Game’s organizers.

Owls aren't the only wise creature when it comes to avoiding trademark trouble. A lawyers group avoids Super Bowl with their Superb Owl 5K.

Superb? Yes? Super? That question is headed toward litigation.

No so fast.

As we see in last week’s story, the NFL has filed a trademark objection about the race, co-organized by attorney Tricia Schafer. The race is a 5K called the Superb Owl Shuffle. But the website is named www.superbowlshuffle.org. So you see the problem.

As the Superb Owl would probably say, Who who who would have guessed the NFL would be prickly about its trademarks? Who would have predicted that such a smile-inducing name would ruffle feathers?

Not this guy, clearly. Happy running.

law school

Is there any better morning than Monday’s to start an argument?

That’s why I wonder if you read an op-ed piece in last week’s New York Times. There, in “Too Many Law Students, Too Few Legal Jobs,” attorney Steven J. Harper assesses what he sees as the continued sorry state of the economics underlying legal education.

NYT Harper essay on law schools illustration by Kevin Lucbert 08-25-15

Illustration by Kevin Lucbert in New York Times

Where do you stand on legal education? Is it still on a troubling path? Or has it located useful solutions? (If you don’t think there was a problem in the first place, well, I don’t know what to say to you.)

He opens with predictably dire statistics regarding the employment picture of law grads. Given all that, and a national wellspring of hand-wringing, the profession must have developed strategies to right the ship. Right?

Not quite, says Harper. Quite the opposite, in fact:

“Amazingly (and perversely), law schools have been able to continue to raise tuition while producing nearly twice as many graduates as the job market has been able to absorb. How is this possible? Why hasn’t the market corrected itself? The answer is that, for a given school, the availability of federal loans for law students has no connection to their poor post-graduation employment outcomes.”

He goes on to spread his critiques liberally. He has little good to say about an ABA task force charged with examining the pr­­oblem. At the end of the day, he says, the task force “dodged the issues that should have been the focus of its work.” And he draws a line between the task force’s mild-mannered assessment of the industry and the man who headed the committee: former ABA President Dennis Archer, “the former mayor of Detroit, who is also head of the national policy board of Infilaw, a private equity-owned consortium of three for-profit law schools—Arizona Summit, Charlotte and Florida Coastal. These schools are examples of the larger problem.”

OK, he’s called out one of the three Arizona law schools, so I imagine I’ll hear some grumbling now.

Before writing me in anger or joy, read Harper’s complete piece here. And tell me what you think.

nnaba National Native American Bar Association logo

On Tuesday, I had the pleasure to meet with Mary Smith, lawyer and Immediate Past President of the National Native American Bar Association.

The specific reason we met was to tape a CLE Snippet, “a unique opportunity to hear directly from the author of an article in the upcoming Arizona Attorney Magazine.”

The topic of our conversation: a recent groundbreaking survey of Native American lawyers, available here.

Last April, I attended the annual Indian Law Conference of the Federal Bar Association, held in Scottsdale. There were some terrific panels, but I was particularly interested in a report about the first-ever survey of Native attorneys.

Panelists for April 9, 2015, “Strength in Numbers: Native Attorneys from Pre-Law to Practice,” L to R: Helen B. Padilla, Director, American Indian Law Center, Inc.; Mary L. Smith, Special Counsel and Estate Trust Officer, Office of the Special Deputy Receiver, and then-President, National Native American Bar Association; Dr. Arin Reeves, CEO, President, Nextions; Makalika Naholowaa, Attorney, Microsoft Corporation; and Francine M. Jaramillo, Staff Attorney, American Indian Law Center, Inc. (Photo by Federal Bar Association)

Panelists for April 9, 2015, “Strength in Numbers: Native Attorneys from Pre-Law to Practice,” L to R: Helen B. Padilla, Director, American Indian Law Center, Inc.; Mary L. Smith, Special Counsel and Estate Trust Officer, Office of the Special Deputy Receiver, and then-President, National Native American Bar Association; Dr. Arin Reeves, CEO, President, Nextions; Makalika Naholowaa, Attorney, Microsoft Corporation; and Francine M. Jaramillo, Staff Attorney, American Indian Law Center, Inc. (Photo by Federal Bar Association)

Mary presented on the survey along with a great panel. The early reports about the survey were that it explored subjects that previously have been shared openly too little. The ultimate survey results more than bore that out. At the conference and afterward, I spoke with Mary about sharing a summary of the results in Arizona Attorney. She kindly agreed, and her article is in the September magazine.

When we met, Mary was kind enough to indulge our tradition of a photo:

Attorney Mary Smith and Arizona Attorney Editor Tim Eigo, August 25, 2015.

Attorney Mary Smith and Arizona Attorney Editor Tim Eigo, August 25, 2015.

In my videotaped dialogue with Mary Smith, I mentioned how impressed I was with the survey. Not only was the survey smart and the responses candid; the report also folded in numerous personal stories and compelling sidebars. I recommend the survey to anyone interested in improving the legal profession or in launching and reporting on survey results.

The videotape will be available here after September 1. I hope a few of you get to watch it, as well as the article on the topic in the September Arizona Attorney Magazine.

September 2015 Arizona Attorney: JAG lawyers stand in front of F-35 at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. (Photo by Karen Shell)

September 2015 Arizona Attorney: JAG lawyers stand in front of F-35 at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. (Photo by Karen Shell)

Today I’m pleased to preview an article on lawyers who serve at Luke Air Force Base. It’ll be in the September issue of Arizona Attorney, and it’s quite a feature.

Written by attorney and JAG officer Rodney Glassman, it’s a complete picture of what goes into serving as an attorney in the Air Force. Adding to the story are the amazing photos, shot on location by photographer Karen Shell.

We’re always happy to feature photos of our Arizona lawyers. But equally exciting was the opportunity to include the new and path-breaking F-35 jet. It’s always nice to break news as well as sound barriers.

Our Luke AFB JAG opening spread (photo by Karen Shell)

Our Luke AFB JAG opening spread (photo by Karen Shell)

Thank you to Art Director Karen Holub for shepherding the photo shoot and for the story design. Here are some photos from the shoot. (Click to biggify.)

It was also fun, as always, to write headlines for our cover. As you can see, I ultimately opted for Gotta Jet. But my backup—and still a strong favorite—would have been Legal Zoom.

Get it? Yes, probably not as good and definitely more controversial.

The complete story is in the magazine mailed this week to readers. It will be available online September 1.

Art With Conviction logo

This Friday an art opening occurs in downtown Phoenix that displays the work of artists who are convicted felons. Art with Conviction is holding its first-ever Phoenix show at {9} The Gallery (1229 Grand Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85007).

One of the works to be displayed at the Art with Conviction show at 9 The Gallery, Aug. 28, 2015.

One of the works to be displayed at the Art with Conviction show at 9 The Gallery, Aug. 28, 2015.

Art with Conviction invites people for the event on August 28, which it describes as “a special evening celebrating humanity and the creative spirit of convicted felons, from 6 to 10 pm and August 29 during the gallery’s regular business hours (12 to 5 pm).”

Here is how the organization describes itself:

“Art With Conviction is a community project whose purpose is to allow people who have been labeled as ‘convicted felons’ to demonstrate to the community that they are more than just a criminal conviction. Instead, through their expression of passion and talent in their artwork, they can be viewed as being a contribution to our society, separate form their past. Art With Conviction was born out of a sense that a felony conviction should not mean a lifetime of stigmatization and harsh judgment as it so often does for so many people. The stigmatization too often results in challenges that are very difficult to overcome no matter how much good work an ex-offender puts between him/herself and the crime.”

You can read more about the event here and about the organization here.

I have written before about the power of art within correctional institutions, whether displayed at a Boston museum, via a university prison education-awareness club, or even by way of a convicted man’s imagining a different home.

If you are able to attend the opening at {9} The Gallery and send me your reactions, I’d appreciate it! Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Arizona Attorney Magazine July/August 2015 beards and mustaches facial hair

Before I move onto touting our September issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine (which is pretty fantastic, if we do say so ourselves), I have to tip my hat to the July/August issue—specifically, our cover story on the wisdom of your witness having facial hair.

As the authors examine, beards and mustaches can be polarizing. And as you’d guess, there are good ways to do beards, and ways not to.

This past week, I strolled into my office’s lunchroom, where there is a small stack of magazines available for reading (even beyond AzAt; I know – I’m as surprised as you are!). That’s when I spotted a Men’s Fitness from this spring.

And what did I see? Facial hair everywhere. (Click to gigantify the bearded celebs.)

Clearly, a touch or more of scruffiness serves their readership. But even the hirsute magazine gave over a small area to muse in a piece titled “Old Growth: A Beard Can Age You Eight Years.”

Facial hair can age you: Hollywood's been warned.

Facial hair can age you: Hollywood’s been warned.

Ouch,” as the old folks say. Well, love facial hair or hate it, read up on this hairy subject in Arizona Attorney here. After all, our authors have combed through a thicket of research to get you answers.

By the way: We’ve had a good amount of fun this month featuring bearded famous folks on the magazine Facebook page. An example is below. Follow us for all the legal fun.

Yes, Arizona Attorney can get cheeky on its Facebook page. facial hair Nick Offerman

Yes, Arizona Attorney can get cheeky on its Facebook page.

Next Page »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,080 other followers