Law School


On Friday, Feb. 6, 2015: The Rehnquist Court Ten Years Later

On Friday, Feb. 6, 2015: The Rehnquist Court Ten Years Later

On Friday this week, a distinguished group will gather in Tucson to commemorate an anniversary related to former Chief Justice William Rehnquist. As the organizers describe it:

“On February 6, 2015, the William H. Rehnquist Center on the Constitutional Structures of Government will convene a day-long conference to mark the tenth anniversary of the end of William H. Rehnquist’s 19 year service as Chief Justice of the United States. The gathering will be a chance to examine the legacy of Chief Justice Rehnquist’s jurisprudence, especially in the areas of federalism, separation of powers, and lawyering. The day will close with an informal reception and dinner for all conference attendees.”

The day’s topics will include:

  • federalism
  • the role of the Chief Justice
  • criminal procedure, and
  • the First Amendment and religion

Rehnquist Center banner logoSpeakers are slated to include practicing lawyers, law professors from the UA and around the country, as well as federal district and Circuit court judges.

You can read the complete program here.

And there is still time to register here.

Note that the event will be held at the Westward Look Resort & Spa (245 E. Ina Road, Tucson 85704). (A map is below.)

Questions? Contact Bernadette Wilkinson at bwilkins@email.arizona.edu or 520-626-1629.

Arizona Summit Law professors Jalae Ulicki (left) and Penny Willrich with Arizona Attorney Editor Tim Eigo, Jan. 20, 2015, after taping of an educational video on mediation as a healing art.

Arizona Summit Law professors Jalae Ulicki (left) and Penny Willrich with Arizona Attorney Editor Tim Eigo, Jan. 20, 2015, after taping of an educational video on mediation as a healing art.

Last week, I got to engage in what has become a highlight of my month: a dialogue with some current Arizona Attorney authors.

The point of the very enjoyable exercise is to create a short video. This partnership with the State Bar of Arizona CLE Department is called “CLE Snippets,” and this month’s authors are Professors Penny Willrich and Jalae Ulicki, both of the Arizona Summit Law School.

The way it works is this: I provide the list of articles for the upcoming month’s issue and chat with Jenn Sonier in the CLE Department. After a little collaboration, we agree on what topic may lend itself well to a brief Q&A video. And the next time we meet in the CLE Center, I try to dress nice, the authors arrive, and Jenn tapes us in riveting conversation.

Well, that’s the plan. Authors Willrich and Ulicki certainly held up their end of the bargain, offering great insight as we discussed their article titled “Lessons Learned From Peacemaking: Mediation as a Healing Art.”

(In what’s become a sort-of tradition, I try to snap a selfie with the authors. This month, the terrific Jenn Sonier did the photographic honors, above.)

I’ll share a link when it’s available. But in the meantime, thank you to our talented authors for taking the time to share their thoughts about an important topic.

Arizona UA Law School logo

A super-quick post today to mention a few events that are coming soon at the University of Arizona College of Law.

First up, two events that give the secret services a moment in the sun.

Ex-FBI agent Terry Hake speaks at UA Law School on January 20, 2015.

Terry Hake

On Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon (in UA Law Room 160), former FBI Agent Terry Hake will speak on “Going Undercover as an Attorney: Inside Operation Greylord.”

“In April 1980, after serving four years as a prosecutor, Terry Hake agreed to assist the FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Chicago in an investigation of the Cook County Court System. For three and one-half years, he worked undercover posing as a corrupt prosecutor and accepting bribes from attorneys and later as an attorney in private practice making payoffs to judges and court personnel for the dismissal of cases. The investigation, known as ‘Greylord,’ resulted in convictions of 18 judges, 57 lawyers, 10 law enforcement offices, and other court personnel. It remains one of the FBI’s most successful undercover investigations.”

Pizza lunch provided (not to undermine the drama of the preceding paragraph).

Online here are links to some case readings that Hake will touch upon.

Ex-CIA officer Michael Hurley speaks at UA Law on Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015.

Ex-CIA officer Michael Hurley will speak at UA Law on Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015.

Next, on Wednesday, Jan. 28, from 4:30-6:00 pm, ex-CIA officer Michael Hurley speaks on “Terrorism in America: What are the current threats, and is the U.S. government doing enough to defend us?”

Register here.

Finally, if you’ve never seen Ninth Circuit oral arguments, you really should get up to San Francisco occasionally. Or, you could simply head down to UA Law on Thursday, Jan. 29 (9:30 am – 11:30 am, Room 164, Ares Auditorium). That’s when the Circuit judges visit the law school “as part of its ongoing public education effort.”

9th_circuit_seal1This judicial visit is hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center on the Constitutional Structures of Government at the UA James E. Rogers College of Law.

Arguments will be heard in three cases:

  • Adobe Systems v. Joshua Christenson, 9:30-10:00 a.m.
  • Arizona Libertarian Party v. Ken Bennett, 10:00-10:30 a.m.
  • Mauricio Margain v. Elsa Ruiz-Bours, 10:30-11:00 a.m.

Q&A session from 11:00-11:30 a.m. More information and case materials are here.

“Seating is available first to those who have registered. Others are welcome to observe on a first-come, first-served basis as space is available.”

Read the security protocol and conduct guidelines” (no kidding) in their entirety here.

Soon, I will mention another UA event, this one in February honoring the anniversary of the prestigious Rehnquist Center.

The 3rd annual ASU-Arkfeld eDiscovery Conference will be on March 12-14, 2015. Get your proposed papers in now.

In the event you have a great eDiscovery treatise banging around in your head (or your desk drawer), here is the opportunity for you.

A respected conference focused on eDiscovery and digital evidence is seeking papers on the topic. They are due by December 2, though, so sharpen your (digital) pencils.

Here is more from conference organizers:

“The Conference welcomes papers that fit within our 2015 theme: ‘Know the Law, Know the Technology.’ Papers might address law, technology, or the intersection of the two. All papers submitted will be fully refereed by a minimum of two specialized referees.”

“Only accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Best papers awards will be distributed during the conference, authors will be given an opportunity to briefly present their papers, and selected papers may be published in Law Technology News.”

“Authors whose papers are accepted will be entitled to complimentary registration for the conference. Papers must comply with the guidelines set forth in the attached announcement. The length of the articles will be 800-1000 words.”

The eDiscovery paper brochure is here. Click for more information.

More detail about the conference itself, to be held March 12-14, 2015, is here.

Giving Tuesday 2014 logoA quick item to consider: #GivingTuesday is coming, and you can play a part.

Here is how the creators of the event describe it:

“We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.”

“It’s a simple idea. Just find a way for your family, your community, your company or your organization to come together to give something more. Then tell everyone you can about how you are giving. Join us and be a part of a global celebration of a new tradition of generosity.”

University of Arizona Law School logoLast year (the second year of the global effort), it was reported that more than 10,000 partner organizations in 50 states and over 15 countries participated. And from the University of Arizona College of Law, we hear that there is a new way to participate: Lawyers in Arizona—and across the country—will be asked to donate the first billable hour of their day to help fund law scholarships for the First Americans.

Here is more detail about the law school’s “First Hour for First Americans”:

  • The University of Arizona College of Law is focusing attention on #GivingTuesday 2014 to kick off a donation-matching fundraising drive for the Huerta Scholars Program, established at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law in Tucson in honor of Judge Lawrence Huerta, the first Native American to graduate from the College of Law (Class of ’53) and practice law in Arizona.
  • The “First Hour for the First Americans” scholarship drive for the Huerta Scholars Program will assist future generations of Native American law students to follow in this trailblazing first American’s footsteps at the University of Arizona.
  • Whether supporters are public defenders, partners in a large or small law firm or prosecutors, their donation of one hour of billable work to the “First Hour for the First Americans” scholarship drive will help bring needed support to a population with few resources and significant legal needs.

You can read more about the effort here and here.

University leaders and dignitaries break ground at the ASU Center for Law & Society in downtown Phoenix, Nov. 13, 2014. Those pictured include law school Dean Doug Sylvester (third from left), retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton (center) and ASU President Michael Crow (right).

University leaders and dignitaries break ground at the ASU Center for Law & Society in downtown Phoenix, Nov. 13, 2014. Those pictured include law school Dean Doug Sylvester (third from left), retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton (center) and ASU President Michael Crow (right).

On a crisp and clear autumn day, Arizona State University officials yesterday welcomed a throng to downtown Phoenix to witness the groundbreaking for its new Center for Law & Society. On a temporarily closed Taylor Street, nearly 200 attendees, many garbed in maroon and gold, happily ate pastries, sipped coffee and smiled as speakers praised the university and touted the new building’s innovative features.

The building ultimately will be 280,000 square feet and cost $129 million to construct and launch. (According to the university, “This includes the cost of the construction, furniture, IT/AV equipment, and all of the soft costs associated with the project.”)

Fork-branded construction headgear awaits dignitaries at the ASU groundbreaking.

Fork-branded construction headgear awaits dignitaries at the ASU groundbreaking.

Speakers at the ceremony included ASU President Michael Crow, U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor (ret.), Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Dean Doug Sylvester, and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton.

President Crow said that the notion of a new kind of law building was conceived as immigration fights raged across Arizona. The topic, he said, is “one of the most important issues we face,” and yet the dialogue was “a rather uninformed series of debates.”

What was missing, he said, was the university’s projecting “our role as teachers and thinkers. We needed a new gathering spot,” he said, and it should be in downtown Phoenix, center of the state’s activities.

President Michael Crow speaks at the groundbreaking, Nov. 13, 2014.

President Michael Crow speaks at the groundbreaking, Nov. 13, 2014.

The building, Crow and other speakers reiterated, would be far more than a law school. It would be “a community center for engagement in law.”

According to the dedicated website, the structure will contain the law school as well as “two think tanks, multiple centers with cross disciplinary focus including the Lincoln Center, and the new ASU Alumni Law Group that will house the first teaching law firm associated with a law school.”

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton called the site “ground zero for discussions of critically important issues.”

“This is about building the kind of community we want,” he continued. “It is about being embedded in the community.”

He added, “There is not an inch of space between the success of ASU as an enterprise and the future success of the City of Phoenix.”

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton signs a construction helmet as attorney Leo Beus looks on, Nov. 13, 2014.

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton signs a construction helmet as attorney Leo Beus looks on, Nov. 13, 2014.

In her brief remarks, Justice O’Connor noted with pleasure that the building would be “open to the public and open for community events.”

President Crow acknowledged the struggles the legal profession faces today, but said the building signifies a new strategy.

“The older models have run their course. We’re forging the new way.”

As of that morning, Crow said, $34 million had been raised toward the building’s construction. ($10 million of that comes from attorney Leo Beus and his wife Annette. It is reportedly the largest single donation in the law school’s history. Leo spoke at the groundbreaking; more detail on his gift is here.)

Shovels await their users at the ASU groundbreaking, Nov. 13, 2014.

Shovels await their users at the ASU groundbreaking, Nov. 13, 2014.

Following the remarks, dignitaries and guests turned some dirt with silver-plated shovels. Meanwhile, attendees could gaze into the two-story-deep excavation where workers prepared footings and rebar for the building’s construction.

Besides the Center’s own website, you also can get more information from its project site, on which you can watch its ever-updating construction cam.

Click here to see more photos from the event at the Arizona Attorney Magazine Facebook page. Below is some more information provided by the university.

Screen-grab from the university's construction cam, Nov. 13, 2014; the groundbreaking occurred near the white tents at the top of the image.

Screen-grab from the university’s construction cam, Nov. 13, 2014; the groundbreaking occurred near the white tents at the top of the image.

“Construction on the Arizona Center for Law and Society began in July. The new building will be ready for classes by August 2016. The College of Law currently occupies its home of almost 50 years, Armstrong Hall, on the Tempe campus. ASU and the College of Law are committed to ensuring that the Armstrong name will be honored in the new law school.”

“The Arizona Center for Law and Society is being funded by the city of Phoenix—which is providing land and $12 million—construction bonds through Arizona State University and private donations. ASU Law has set a capital campaign goal of $50 million for contruction of the building. The College has raised more than $34 million so far.”

“‘This could not have been possible without the generosity of our alumni and connected legal communities,’ Dean Sylvester said. ‘We are particularly honored that long-time Phoenix attorney Leo Beus and his wife, Annette, recently made a $10 million contribution to the building’s capital campaign.’”

“The building is planned to be approximately 280,000 gross square feet with two levels of underground parking. It will have 18 rooms in which classes will be regularly scheduled, including one large lecture hall dedicated to university undergraduate education. Features of the new law school include a high-tech courtroom and an active learning classroom.”

“‘Not only will the new law school have state-of-the-art learning facilities, it also will provide our students with incredible opportunities,’ Sylvester said. ‘The downtown location is near the courts and the city’s legal district, which will prove invaluable to our students in the form of internships, externships and networking.’”

“The Ross–Blakley Law Library, currently located in a separate building near the law school in Tempe, will be moved to the new building. The library will occupy multiple floors and create the main circulatory structure of the center. The first floor of the building will have retail space consisting of a school bookstore and a café.”

“The Arizona Center for Law and Society also will include space for two think tanks, multiple centers with cross-disciplinary focus and the new ASU Alumni Law Group, the first teaching law firm associated with a law school.”

“The lead architects on the project are Ennead Architects and Jones Studios, with DPR Construction as the lead builder.”

 

Construction crane on the site of ASU's Center for Law & Society in downtown Phoenix.

Construction crane on the site of ASU’s Center for Law & Society in downtown Phoenix.

University of Arizona Law School

The University of Arizona Law School will be the location of Arizona Supreme Court oral arguments on Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014.

Two fascinating issues will be addressed Thursday, November 6, when the Arizona Supreme Court holds oral arguments during a visit to Tucson. The arguments will occur at the UA James E. Rogers College of Law (1201 E. Speedway Blvd., Ares Auditorium, Room 164), from 2:00 to 4:00 pm.

The Court will hear appellate arguments in two cases (I have stated below the issue for each; for a fuller treatment, click on the cases):

Issue: Do individual legislators have standing to challenge a law simply by alleging that a supermajority was required for its passage?

Issue: Is a criminal defendant precluded from raising an ineffective assistance of counsel claim in a successive post-conviction relief proceeding when, without fault of his own, his prior two court-appointed attorneys failed to file a petition in the two prior post-conviction relief proceedings?

Arizona_Supreme_Court_SealThe travel to Tucson is part of the Court’s statewide public education effort.

As the law school reports:

“This judicial visit is hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center for the Constitutional Structures of Government at the James E. Rogers College of Law.”

Seating is limited and available to those who have preregistered here.

“Others are welcome on a first-come, first-serve basis as remaining space allows.”

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