Law School

Richard Fried

Richard Fried

“How A Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can Improve the Lives of Victims” is the subject of a public lecture tomorrow at the University of Arizona law school. Attorney Richard Fried will deliver the lecture, which is part of the school’s Civil Justice Initiative.

Here is more detail from the school:

“As part of our annual Civil Justice lecture series, University of Arizona Law welcomes Richard Fried for a community presentation on trial practice and plaintiff’s representation. He will be speaking on How A Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can Improve the Lives of Victims. Reception to follow.

When: Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, 5-6:30 p.m.

Where: University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, Room 160, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd.

Who may attend: This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP here.

“L. Richard Fried, Jr. is one of the founding members of Cronin, Fried, Sekiya, Kekina & Fairbanks and has practiced law for over 40 years. Rick has a national reputation in the fields of medical malpractice—having obtained 50 verdicts and settlements in excess of $1 million—and aviation law. He served as President of the Hawaii Association for Justice (formerly the Consumer Lawyers of Hawaii) in 1984 and 2001, and was the recipient of their first trial lawyer of the year award in 1994.”

“He was appointed by the Chief Justice of the Hawaii State Supreme Court to serve on the Judicial Evaluation Committee for the State of Hawaii and the Chief Judge of the Hawaii Federal District Court to serve as a delegate to the federal district judges conference.”

“In July 2015, he was named as Chairman of the Hawaii Tourism Authority, where he has served on the Board of Directors since 2012. He has also served on the boards of local organizations such as the Honolulu Symphony, Hawaii Theatre, and the American Civil Liberties Union.”

“The Civil Justice Initiative aims to help Arizona Law elevate the American civil justice system and become the premier destination for educating trial lawyers. A hallmark of the CJI is the annual Civil Justice lecture series, showcasing leading advocates to the student body and the legal community. Past distinguished lecturers include Tom Girardi and Pat McGroder.”

A recent Phoenix conference examined difficult questions about concussions and what should be done about them.

A recent Phoenix conference examined difficult questions about concussions and what should be done about them.

What are the legal and ethical implications that face society as we learn more about the brain and the corrosive effects of concussions?

On Friday, I had the good fortune to catch the final hour of an all-day conference committed to that and other important questions. That hour was the conference’s capstone and featured a panel Q&A moderated by legal star Arthur R. Miller, a law professor at NYU. I may write about that panel in an upcoming Arizona Attorney Magazine.

safeguarding brains ASU conference 11-13-15

In the meantime, I share an editorial that ran in Friday’s Arizona Republic. In “Ending the Concussion Epidemic,” conference organizers Betsy Grey and Gary Marchant, both professors with the Center for Law, Science & Innovation at ASU Law, offer valuable insight. Let’s hope conferences and articles like this help legal and government leaders make good choices.

(And it’s worth noting that Gary Marchant wrote for us before, on personalized medicine and the law.)

Heather Mac Donald

Heather Mac Donald

Tonight, Thursday, Nov. 12, conservative commenter Heather Mac Donald will visit ASU to deliver a talk titled “Is the American Great Crime Decline Sustainable?

The free public lecture will be delivered at 6:30 pm on the ASU Tempe campus, ISTB4, Marston Theater.

According to event organizers, Mac Donald’s work has largely focused on crime rates and race. She “pushes back against common arguments of racism in policing and the criminal justice system as a whole to argue for preventative policing that she believes contributed to the 20-year decline of crime in America.”

Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal. Her work covers a range of topics, including homeland security, immigration, policing and racial profiling, homelessness and homeless advocacy, and educational policy.

You can see more of what the speaker advocates here, via C-SPAN:

Heather Mac Donald book cover policing racismIntroducing Mac Donald will be Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery.

Following Mac Donald’s talk, the former director of the Office for Victims of Crime, John W. Gillis, will give a brief talk about his career and experiences. He is a founding member of Justice for Homicide Victims and the Coalition of Victims Equal Rights.

More information and a Q&A with Montgomery and Gillis are here.

The event is free. RSVP here.

Parking is available (for a fee) in the Rural Road Parking Structure.

University of Arizona Law School

The University of Arizona Law School will be the location of Arizona Supreme Court oral arguments on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2015.

Today, I share some news from the Arizona Supreme Court about its holding oral arguments in Tucson tomorrow, Tuesday, November 10, 2015:

“The justices have identified two cases to be presented, and attorneys representing each side will be given 20 minutes to present their arguments. After the second case, the justices will take questions from the audience, as long as those questions do not pertain to the case or cases they just heard.”

When: Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015, 2-4 p.m. Guests must arrive no later than 1:10 p.m. in order to go through security screening.

Where: Ares Auditorium, Room 164, University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd.

Who may attend: Seating is limited and available to those who have preregistered here. Members of the public are welcome on a first-come, first-served basis as remaining space allows. Note that food and beverages are not permitted past security.

Arizona_Supreme_Court_SealThe Court will hear appellate arguments in two cases (click the case name for more detail):

2-2:40 p.m.: State v. Joseph Javier Romero, CR-15-0039-PR (issue regards the Daubert standard for expert witnesses)

3-3:50 p.m.: Jackie Abbott et al. v Banner Health Network et al., CV-15-0013-PR (issue regards a patient class-action against Arizona hospitals in which patients claim hospitals engaged in “balance billing” in liens, precluded by federal law)

The Supreme Court oral arguments will be live-streamed/simulcast and archived for later viewing here. The Court’s Tucson visit is hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center at the James E. Rogers College of Law.

Event questions may be directed to Bernadette Wilkinson, senior program coordinator, UA College of Law,, 520-626-1629.

You know the law ... but how's your practice know-how?

You know the law … but how’s your practice know-how?

Last month, I heard from a lawyer and law professor. He had written an article for publication on the blog of the Washington State Bar Association, and he wondered if I was interested in publishing it too.

I was intrigued—and not just because John Lande and I graduated from the same law school (in different years; we don’t know each other). I was interested because the material could be useful to practicing lawyers.

Let’s begin with the title: Tips For Lawyers Who Want To Get Good Results For Clients And Make Money”

So right off the bat, we see that John knows how to draw readers in.

Here is a little about John:

“At the University of Missouri School of Law, John Lande is the Isidor Loeb Professor Emeritus and former director of the LLM Program in Dispute Resolution. He received his J.D. from Hastings College of Law and Ph.D in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before coming to MU, he was director of the Mediation Program and assistant professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock School of Law, where he supervised a child protection mediation clinic.”

John Lande

John Lande

You can read his more complete bio here.

Most important for today’s purposes, he contributes to the Indisputably blog of ADR law professors.

In his post, he examines with some detail multiple areas of law practice. An initial glance may suggest to you that you “already know this stuff.” In fact, most lawyers should have some facility with each of John’s topics (I’d hope!). But a more leisurely read reveals nuggets that would serve attorneys well.

Here are the topic areas he discusses:

  • Understand Your Clients’ Interests
  • Pay Attention to What’s Really Important in Your Cases, Not Just the Law or Winning
  • Recognize the Importance of Emotions–Especially Yours
  • Get to Know Your Counterpart Lawyer
  • Make a Habit of Preparing to Resolve Matters at the Earliest Appropriate Time
  • Be Prepared to Negotiate More than You Might Expect
  • Get Help From Mediators When Needed
  • Be Prepared to Advocate Hard and Smart

You can read John’s complete blog post here.

And he welcomes comments and questions; contact him here:

ASU Law School Gold and Gavel

In just over a week, the ASU Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law serves up its annual Gold ‘n Gavel Auction and Reception. It will be held on September 25 in the downtown Phoenix Sheraton, and this year’s overarching theme is sustainability. Given the school’s sustainability initiatives—and the fact that this event contributes to student scholarships—the theme is well chosen.

All of the detail is on the event’s dedicated website.

I was pleased and surprised at how much detail there is about all aspects of the event, including the auction, even the online portion. And who doesn’t like looking at photos from last year’s event, available on the home page? (which is very smart, as it shows you how vibrant the event is, and offers guidance for this year’s event-goers as to what level of dress attendees bring to the affair).

All the deets:

  • When: Friday, Sept. 25, 6-9:30 p.m.
  • Price: $95 General Admission Beginning Sept. 1
  • Where: Sheraton Downtown Phoenix, 340 N. 3rd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

Once you’ve had your fill of event information, you can register here.

And in case you were wondering, here’s what the event organizers say:

“Ticket Price includes: Passed hors d’oeuvres, light dinner buffet, specialty dessert, complimentary non-alcoholic beverages, one drink ticket (for beer/wine/liquor), and one door prize raffle ticket. Proceeds from your ticket sale will directly support student scholarships and programs within the College of Law.”

Notable Supreme Court cases to be discussed at Rehnquist Center Constitution Day Program on September 21.

Notable Supreme Court cases to be discussed at Rehnquist Center Constitution Day Program on September 21.

Whenever I mention Constitution Day, some legal wag is bound to contact me to remind, “But Tim, every day is Constitution Day!”

To that I say, huzzah for your enthusiasm. But accuracy compels me to remind in return: Constitution Day falls in September every year, your eager patriotism notwithstanding.

For the truly eager (and patriotic), I recommend to you the Constitution Day program planned at the Rehnquist Center at the University of Arizona College of Law. It will be held next Monday, September 21, from 1:00 to 4:30 pm.

Registration (free!) is here.

Last year, I was able to attend in person. (No such luck this year.) Here’s my story from that compelling panel discussion.

As organizers describe next Monday’s event:

The panel discussion features legal experts who will review some of the major cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the 2014 term.

Panelists include:

The moderator will once again be the law school’s Professor David Marcus.

Hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center in the UA James E. Rogers College of Law, the event will feature a panel of legal experts reviewing notable cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the 2014 Term.

What will they discuss? Here are some of the seminal decisions they’ll cover:

  • King v. Burwell, in which the Supreme Court upheld a provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that offers tax credits to individuals who purchase health insurance through federal exchanges.
  • Horne v. Department of Agriculture, a takings case involving the Fifth Amendment and the government’s responsibility to pay just compensation when it takes personal property.
  • Obergefell v. Hodges, in which the court held that same-sex couples’ right to marry is guaranteed under the Fourteenth Amendment.
  • Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, in which the court found that Arizona voters have the right to transfer redistricting power from the state legislature to an independent commission.

As always, if you attend and take any photos or decide you’d like to write a brief summary of the highlights, I’d be happy to chart about a guest blog post. Write to me at

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