SBA program on dementia in the legal profession 04-07-17

This Friday, a program examines the growing problem of dementia in society—specifically its impact on attorneys and the legal profession.

It follows on the heels of a terrifically successful February program touching on the topic. That CLE reached more than 1,000 registrants nationwide (which I covered here). But this seminar on Friday focuses on the needs of and processes for Arizona practitioners.

Here is information about the program, titled “Spotlight on Dementia: Arizona Lawyers, Judges and the Practice of Law” (May qualify for up to 2 CLE/1 Ethics).

When: April 7, 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: McAuliffe CLE Center, 4201 N. 24th Street, Phoenix

To Register:

Detail:

sba_logo_color State Bar of ArizonaAlzheimer’s and other dementias do not typically announce their arrival in a sudden manner. The gradual onset of the disease means that subtle changes in a person’s behavior or performance may not be initially recognized as dementia. Co-workers and colleagues are frequently one of the first to notice changes. This program addresses dementia issues as they pertain to attorneys and judges.

Program highlights include:

  • Recognizing symptoms of dementia, treatment options and ongoing care
  • Duties and obligations of Arizona lawyers and judges and practical approaches to follow if one suspects a colleague or client has dementia
  • Resources for patients, families and caregivers

Seminar Faculty:

  • Hon. Louraine Arkfeld, Tempe Municipal Court (ret.)
  • Justice Clint Bolick, Arizona Supreme Court
  • Hon. Louis Dominguez, Surprise City Court
  • Jan Dougherty, MS, RN, FAAN, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
  • Hon. Margaret Downie, Arizona Court of Appeals – Division One
  • James Fitzpatrick, Alzheimer’s Association, Desert Southwest Chapter
  • Marsha Goodman, Frazer, Ryan, Goldberg and Arnold, LLP
  • Lisa Panahi, State Bar of Arizona
  • Hon. Roxanne Song Ong, Phoenix Municipal Court (ret.)

Court Personnel: For additional viewing options please contact: Renu Sapra at 602-452-3015 or rsapra@courts.az.gov

Abogados a Su Lado on immigration 03-01-17

Attorneys assist at Abogados a Su Lado phone bank, March 1, 2017.

News from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez:

The State Bar of Arizona and Univision Arizona hosted the first Abogados a Su Lado (attorneys on your side) phone bank of the year on Wednesday, March 1, 2017. This access to justice program was held to help the immigrant community understand the impact of the President’s Executive Orders.

The Bar’s role as a partner and organizer of the phone bank was to help the immigrant community connect with licensed attorneys for sound legal advice. The immigrant community is often victimized by notarios and document preparers during high-profile activity associated with immigration law.

The phone bank on immigration law was held on Wednesday, March 1, from 5:00 to 10:30 p.m.

sba_logo_color State Bar of ArizonaThere were nine volunteer attorneys:

  • Marisol Angulo, Hernandez Global
  • Emilia Banuelos, Banuelos Law Office
  • Vanessa Black, Vanessa Black Law Immigration Law Firm
  • Joshua De La Ossa, De La Ossa & Ramos
  • Seth B. Draper, Salvatierra Law Group
  • Judy Flanagan, Judy C. Flanagan, PC
  • Ayensa Millan, CIMA Law Group
  • Edwin G. Ramos, De La Ossa & Ramos
  • Javier Sobampo, Sobampo Law Firm

Volunteer attorneys answered 381 calls regarding immigrant rights and changes in immigration law during the five-and-a-half-hour phone bank.

We thank the attorneys as well as Univision Arizona for its continued partnership in providing this valuable program for the Spanish-speaking community. We also thank the volunteers from Mi Familia Vota who helped with event logistics.

state-bar-of-arizona-dementia-program

Every 66 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease.

That stunning fact—and its impact on our personal and professional lives—drove the creation of a special State Bar of Arizona program on dementia and its impact on lawyers and judges.

The free live webinar will be screened one week from today, on Wednesday, Feb. 15, from 10 am to 11:15 am.

More information and free registration are here.

The program is being produced by the State Bar and the Arizona Supreme Court, in cooperation with InReach.

As organizers say, the number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, is rapidly growing in part due to the aging baby-boomer population and increased life expectancy. Currently, an estimated 5.4 million Americans are living with the disease.

The Bar’s hope for the program is to:

  • share information about the signs of dementia
  • provide links to help navigate the available resources
  • highlight the responsibilities and opportunities for lawyers and judges.

The program is not intended to offer CLE credit as it has not been developed with MCLE rules in mind. Instead, it is available as a service for members of the bench and the bar.

(The Bar will offer a follow-up three-hour CLE program in April that addresses Arizona-specific duties and opportunities.)

State Bar of Arizona logo 

Hollywood and the rest of us all love films featuring lawyers and their ethical dilemmas. To Kill a Mockingbird

Hollywood and the rest of us all love films featuring lawyers and their ethical dilemmas.

If you’re at all like me (and why wouldn’t you be), a full week of work following the short Thanksgiving week seems almost cruel. Perhaps you’re seeking a way to lessen the strain of five days of nonstop labor.

If that’s the case, consider going to the movies.

This Friday, December 2, the State Bar offers a favorite program that examines the intersection of great films and ethical choices that face attorneys.

See how I just used $5 words to describe a theater-screening?

The event is titled “A New Ethical Morning at the Movies,” which would only be improved by being in the evening and having less ethics. But if that were the case, no CLE credit would be available, so I see their point.

All the detail is here.

sba-cle-ethical-morning-at-the-movies-12-02-16

Larry Cohen is a great presenter, and he heads a panel of other talented speakers who all know legal ethics inside-out—and who like a great flick.

Here’s hoping they have popcorn.

In the meantime, enjoy yourself a little Jackie Chiles, the great lawyer character from Seinfeld. I know it’s the small screen, not the silver screen, but it speaks loudly to lawyer ethics—and hot coffee.

Photos from the Glendale Stand Up for Veterans, Sept. 24, 2016.

Photos from the Glendale Stand Up for Veterans, Sept. 24, 2016.

Some great news from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez:

On Saturday, September 24, 2016, the State Bar of Arizona and 11 of its members participated in the 2016 Glendale Stand Up for Veterans event at Glendale Community College. The State Bar and volunteer attorneys joined several service providers at the one-day event that offered a variety of free health and human services to 324 veterans in our state. Volunteer attorneys from across the Valley answered questions during one-on-one consultations with veterans seeking legal advice.

The “Civil Law Clinic” organized by the State Bar offered legal consultations by members who practice family law, bankruptcy/foreclosure/tax law, probate/trust law, and real estate/landlord & tenant law.

pro bono gavelVolunteer attorneys provided 77 consultations during the legal clinic for the 63 veterans who were seen. In addition, many attorneys offered pro-bono legal services after the Stand Up to veterans who needed additional help. Adding to the legal services provided for veterans, on-site courts coordinated by Hon. Elizabeth Finn, Presiding Judge of the Glendale City Court, saw 231veterans who needed to address court-related issues.

The State Bar offers its sincerest appreciation to the attorneys who committed to helping veterans at the Stand Up event. The following is a list of the attorney and logistics volunteers:

VOLUNTEER ATTORNEYS

Dorothy Brogan, Law Office of Dorothy E. Brogan

Doug Edmunds, Edmunds Law

Rebecca Elliot, Rebecca Elliott Attorney at Law

Nathan Finch, Catalyst Legal Group

Tim R. Geiger, Geiger Law Offices

Steven D. Keist, Keist Law

Tonya MacBeth, Burch & Cracchiolo, PA

Cindy Greene, Simmons & Greene, PC

Ian Hasegawa, Hasegawa Paulsen, PLC

Brant Hodyno, Brant Hodyno, Compassionate Counsel

Janis Villalpando, Community Legal Services

 

VOLUNTEER PARALEGAL

Cory Rade

 

LOGISTICS VOLUNTEER

Katrina Morales, Community Volunteer

 

Steve Hirsch (photo: Quarles & Brady)

Steve Hirsch (photo: Quarles & Brady)

Today, I offer congratulations to lawyer and leader Steve Hirsch, who will be honored by the William E. Morris Institute this evening, Thursday, Oct. 20.

Steve is a longtime member of the State Bar Board of Governors—and a genuinely nice guy.

William E. Morris Institute for Justice logoTonight’s event is from 5:30 to 7:30 pm at the University Club, 39 E. Monte Vista Road, Phoenix. The RSVP period is officially closed, but more information may be available from the Institute’s Ellen Katz at eskatz@qwestoffice.net or call 602-252-3432. I’m sure Ellen is swamped with details today, so don’t tell her I urged you to call!

Steve recently was also honored with his induction into the Maricopa County Bar Association Hall of Fameanother remarkable achievement.

And if you do find some way to attend tonight’s Morris Institute event, it’s worth noting that the Institute qualifies for the qualifying charitable organization tax credit. This year the tax credit limits increase to $400 for an individual and $800 for a married couple. Support like that is the kind of leadership Steve would appreciate.

State Bar of Arizona SBA_Logo_ColorIn case you missed it, here is news about important changes to Rule 32, the Arizona Supreme Court rule that establishes and defines the State Bar. The changes were proposed by the Task Force on the Review of the Role and Governance Structure of the State Bar of Arizona, led by former Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch. The task force was created in 2014 (see the Order).

As the State Bar reports,

“The State Bar of Arizona’s consumer protection role has been enhanced thanks to a revised rule from the Arizona Supreme Court. The changes to Rule 32 … add language that refines the organization’s mission. While the State Bar has always focused its efforts on protecting the public, that language is now in the rule. The updated wording says, ‘The State Bar of Arizona exists to serve and protect the public with respect to the provision of legal services and access to justice.’”

Arizona_Supreme_Court_SealOther changes affect the Board of Governors and the Board of Legal Specialization, among other things.

You can read about the changes here.

And the full rule change is here.