Law Practice

Richard Fried

Richard Fried

“How A Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can Improve the Lives of Victims” is the subject of a public lecture tomorrow at the University of Arizona law school. Attorney Richard Fried will deliver the lecture, which is part of the school’s Civil Justice Initiative.

Here is more detail from the school:

“As part of our annual Civil Justice lecture series, University of Arizona Law welcomes Richard Fried for a community presentation on trial practice and plaintiff’s representation. He will be speaking on How A Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can Improve the Lives of Victims. Reception to follow.

When: Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015, 5-6:30 p.m.

Where: University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, Room 160, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd.

Who may attend: This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP here.

“L. Richard Fried, Jr. is one of the founding members of Cronin, Fried, Sekiya, Kekina & Fairbanks and has practiced law for over 40 years. Rick has a national reputation in the fields of medical malpractice—having obtained 50 verdicts and settlements in excess of $1 million—and aviation law. He served as President of the Hawaii Association for Justice (formerly the Consumer Lawyers of Hawaii) in 1984 and 2001, and was the recipient of their first trial lawyer of the year award in 1994.”

“He was appointed by the Chief Justice of the Hawaii State Supreme Court to serve on the Judicial Evaluation Committee for the State of Hawaii and the Chief Judge of the Hawaii Federal District Court to serve as a delegate to the federal district judges conference.”

“In July 2015, he was named as Chairman of the Hawaii Tourism Authority, where he has served on the Board of Directors since 2012. He has also served on the boards of local organizations such as the Honolulu Symphony, Hawaii Theatre, and the American Civil Liberties Union.”

“The Civil Justice Initiative aims to help Arizona Law elevate the American civil justice system and become the premier destination for educating trial lawyers. A hallmark of the CJI is the annual Civil Justice lecture series, showcasing leading advocates to the student body and the legal community. Past distinguished lecturers include Tom Girardi and Pat McGroder.”

The lying-down desk eases your work and smooths our national path to a less-impressive future.

The lying-down desk eases your work and smooths our national path to a less-impressive future.

It’s Change of Venue Friday, so I recline in comfort as I draft this easygoing piece.

Unfortunately, my laptop is perched uncomfortably on my lap, and my heels rest painfully on the sharp edge of a tabletop. While I muse that this may be the very definition of “First World Problems,” furniture engineers (yes, it’s a thing) toil to answer the question, “How can we end this long dark chapter in human history?”

Did someone say “lying down desk”?

Yes, they did, America. In fact, more and more folks are talking about this new product from Altwork. Even the ABA Journal took note of this reclining wonder. Because lawyers need to take a load off.

Lying down is not just for science-fiction heroes, Altwork says. Everyone can recline.

Lying down is not just for science-fiction heroes, Altwork says. Everyone can recline.

But who would use such a thing—and how does it work?

As Mashable tells us,

“This workstation is being marketed towards programmers, designers, writers and anyone else who uses a computer as their primary working tool. The Altwork Station offers four modes, all configurable with buttons on the desk surface; standing, collaboration, regular and focus. Standing and regular are exactly what you’d expect and collaboration is simply turning your monitor on the built in arm to work with others. Focus mode is where it gets interesting though, as that’s where you can recline the chair to be completely horizontal, with the desk and monitor following suit.”

Read more about the $5,900 chair here.

Yes, I say fifty-nine hundred dollars. But the more I read about it, the more I’m horrified and convinced I should have one. O, comfortable efficiency, you are an attractive siren!

At home, this is what I thought a work chair looked like. (And this one was used in the filming of feature film "Durant's Never Closes"!)

At home, this is what I thought a work chair looked like. (And this one was used in the filming of feature film “Durant’s Never Closes”!)

And if you need to know more (as you decide whether I should be gifted a better writing set-up than my current one), here is a video describing the whole dealio.

Have a wonderful—and topsy-turvy—weekend.

Quarles & Brady folks at Capitol School, Oct. 30, 2015.

Quarles & Brady folks at Capitol School, Oct. 30, 2015.

News from the Phoenix office of Quarles & Brady:

On Friday, Oct. 30, nearly two dozen members of Quarles & Brady’s Phoenix office joined together to volunteer their time as “homeroom parents” at the Capitol School’s annual Fall Celebration. This was the first of three events during the 2015–2016 school year in which attorneys and staff will volunteer their team to the Capitol School, just west of downtown Phoenix, providing both treats and interactive activities to engage students from Kindergarten to sixth grade.

“Capitol Elementary School strives to create a healthy learning environment where students are given a quality education that includes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become lifelong learners and responsible citizens—we respect that and want to do everything we can to help,” said Scott Jenkins, a partner in the Phoenix office who even brought his own children to volunteer with the team. “In addition to rolling up our sleeves with the kids, the firm also fundraises to support and put on special school events, including field trips to Boston and Washington, D.C.”

According to Jenkins, partnership between Quarles & Brady and the Capitol School dates back a quarter century.

“In 1990, Quarles & Brady set out to find a community project that would provide sustainable, ongoing volunteerism to bring their firm members together with purpose beyond business,” said Jenkins. “With so many parents and grandparents working at the firm, focusing on children and education was a priority.”

While the Capitol School program kicked off with the attorneys and staff putting on homeroom class parties, the partnership quickly evolved into one that included reading and writing assistance, mentorship, fundraising, financial support to students’ families when in crisis, and even a donation to help remodel the school’s media center.

This effort is one of many the local office takes part in through its Quarles Cares community relations program, which is focused on connecting directly with local communities to understand the residents’ needs. Through the volunteer initiatives, attorneys and staff commit themselves personally to civic and charitable efforts, and their personal growth is reflected in the workplace. More information is here.

Tile mural dedicated by Capitol School to Quarles & Brady.

Tile mural dedicated by Capitol School to Quarles & Brady.

Arizona Supreme Court building

A new Arizona Justice will be appointed by Gov. Doug Ducey. Applicant interviews will be held on Nov. 20, 2015.

Note: The following post was edited to reflect changes announced by the Arizona Supreme Court at 9:40 a.m. The changes indicate that the judicial-applicant interviews will be taped and posted later, but not streamed live. The Court announced, “We reviewed how interviews were done in the past and we have not previously simulcast/webcast the interviews.  A decision was made to be consistent with previous interviews.” The interviews will still be open to the public.

The Arizona Supreme Court has announced that on this Friday, November 20, interviews for applicants for a vacant Justice position will be held and be open to the public, beginning at 8:00 a.m.

The interviews will also be taped, recorded, and then posted in their entirety later on the Court’s website. The Court anticipates posting all the video by 5:00 p.m. the same day.

The nine individuals to be interviewed in the public meeting were selected by the Arizona Commission on Appellate Court Appointments. At the end of the meeting, the Commission members will vote on a slate of at least three nominees to send to Gov. Doug Ducey, who will be making his first appointment to the Arizona Supreme Court.

Arizona_Supreme_Court_SealI provided the list of applicants previously here.

The Court has posted each individual’s application on its website. The agenda for the meeting is here. “As noted on the agenda, there may be executive sessions before and after the public interviews. Interviews will be 30 minutes long and will be taped and available for viewing by 5:00 p.m. on November 20. The landing page for our webcast and archived videos is here.”


State Bar of Arizona lawyers answer family-law questions, Nov. 10, 2015.

State Bar of Arizona lawyers answer family-law questions, Nov. 10, 2015.

On Tuesday, November 10, the State Bar of Arizona and 12 News hosted the Lawyers on Call public service program. There, eight attorneys volunteered their time and expertise to answer viewers’ questions on family law issues.

The following update comes from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez:

State Bar of Arizona SBA_Logo_ColorEight attorneys volunteered their time:

  • Taylor Anderson, Anderson & Cabrera Law Group
  • Ryan Borges, The Borges Law Firm
  • Rebecca Browning, Browning Law Office
  • Tabitha Cabrera, Anderson & Cabrera Law Group
  • Craig Cherny, Canterbury Law Group
  • Kina Harding, The Harding Firm
  • Daniel Rodriguez, Diaz, Rodriguez & Associates
  • Jennifer Shick, Shick Law Offices

12 News logoThe lawyers answered 156 calls during the two-hour phone bank.

Sample consumer questions:

  • How do I file for a divorce? Do I need an attorney?
  • Can I stop paying alimony/spousal support?
  • How long do I have to be married to get alimony/spousal support?
  • How do I enforce court-ordered child support? Can I modify child support?
  • How do I modify a parenting plan/parenting time?
  • Do I have any rights as a grandparent?

Four of the eight attorneys were first-time volunteers. Congratulations and thanks to all who participated.

A recent Phoenix conference examined difficult questions about concussions and what should be done about them.

A recent Phoenix conference examined difficult questions about concussions and what should be done about them.

What are the legal and ethical implications that face society as we learn more about the brain and the corrosive effects of concussions?

On Friday, I had the good fortune to catch the final hour of an all-day conference committed to that and other important questions. That hour was the conference’s capstone and featured a panel Q&A moderated by legal star Arthur R. Miller, a law professor at NYU. I may write about that panel in an upcoming Arizona Attorney Magazine.

safeguarding brains ASU conference 11-13-15

In the meantime, I share an editorial that ran in Friday’s Arizona Republic. In “Ending the Concussion Epidemic,” conference organizers Betsy Grey and Gary Marchant, both professors with the Center for Law, Science & Innovation at ASU Law, offer valuable insight. Let’s hope conferences and articles like this help legal and government leaders make good choices.

(And it’s worth noting that Gary Marchant wrote for us before, on personalized medicine and the law.)

Seasonal hiring requires thoughtful decisions to avoid legal pitfalls.

Seasonal hiring requires thoughtful decisions to avoid legal pitfalls.

Today, I’m pleased to offer a seasonal and timely guest post by Greenberg Traurig attorney Mona Mehta Stone. Of Counsel with the firm, she is a labor and employment attorney. You may have clients or colleagues who would benefit from the information; please feel free to share it and pass it on. To reach the author, email her at

Arizona employers are once again turning to seasonal workers to assist with increased work demands that occur this time of year. According to the American Staffing Association (the “ASA”), there were approximately 213,003 staffing jobs in Arizona in 2014, with the workforce being comprised of 45 percent females and 55 percent males. The 25–44 years of age demographic made up 49 percent of the worker profile.

The reliance on seasonal employees is expected to continue rising. Whether due to increased retail and hospitality needs, industry fluctuations, or coverage for absent or ill employees, employers should keep in mind a few best practices to consider when hiring seasonal workers this year:

  • In order to avoid unfair treatment of job applicants and seasonal employees, coordinate and centralize all hiring decisions in your company for consistency.
  • Ensure that all job postings indicate the short-term, seasonal nature of the position, and reiterate that message during interviews and upon hiring.
  • Do not guarantee benefits that are only available to permanent employees (e.g., paid vacation time or retirement benefits), and specify the wage rate, pay period, pay date, and expected length of employment to seasonal workers.
  • Mona Mehta Stone

    Mona Mehta Stone

    Carefully consider how to contract for temporary staff, including respective responsibilities that the employer and staffing agency will retain. The worker’s seasonal status must be clearly defined, as well the potential for an employer-employee relationship being created directly between the employer and seasonal employee.

  • Whether working with a staffing agency or hiring seasonal workers independently, recognize that these employees may count toward employee numbers required under certain state and federal employment laws (e.g., EEOC, WARN, ADEA, ADA).
  • Train seasonal workers on all workplace policies and rules, including discrimination and harassment.
  • Understand what state and federal tax laws apply to seasonal employees.
  • Monitor hours, expenses, and employee performance associated with seasonal workers. Failure to do so may not reveal hidden costs, including potential legal, financial and security exposure and liability.
  • Treat seasonal employees with the same respect and guidance as you would for your permanent workforce.

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