Former Senator Mark Udall will deliver a lecture at the UA Law School on March 10, 2015.

Former Senator Mark Udall will deliver a lecture at the UA Law School on March 10, 2015.

“It’s 2015: Why Are We Still Debating Torture?” is the provocative and timely title for former Sen. Mark Udall’s 2015 Marks Lecture, which he will deliver at the James E. Rogers College of Law in Tucson on Tuesday, March 10.

The event is free and open to the public, but you must register here.

Background provided by the law school illustrates why the ex-lawmaker is a good fit for this topic:

“Senator Udall, who served on the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, led the bipartisan effort to rein in the NSA’s dragnet collection of Americans’ personal data. He also has been an unwavering advocate for strong, independent oversight of the CIA. He was one of the leading advocates for releasing the Senate Intelligence Committee’s study of the CIA’s detention and interrogation program.”

News stories on the former Senator’s willingness to demand accountability from entrenched and powerful agencies suggest his lecture will be candid and eye-opening. Read about Mark Udall here, here, and here.

The UA Law School information continues:

“Senator Udall is known for reaching across party lines to solve problems and for his willingness to work with people, including those with whom he has philosophical differences. He championed bipartisan legislation to balance the nation’s budget, protect our public lands and establish a strong national security policy. While in the Senate, he served on the Select Committee on Intelligence.”

Arizona UA Law School logoUdall is a Colorado resident, and he represented that state in the U.S. Senate from 2009 through 2014 and in the House from 1999 to 2008. He also served a term in the Colorado State Legislature from 1997 to 1999.

When: Tuesday, March 10, 2015, 5:30-6:30 pm

Where: James E. Rogers College of Law, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd., Room 164 (Ares Auditorium), Tucson, AZ 85721

Here’s a map:

 

On Friday, Feb. 6, 2015: The Rehnquist Court Ten Years Later

On Friday, Feb. 6, 2015: The Rehnquist Court Ten Years Later

On Friday this week, a distinguished group will gather in Tucson to commemorate an anniversary related to former Chief Justice William Rehnquist. As the organizers describe it:

“On February 6, 2015, the William H. Rehnquist Center on the Constitutional Structures of Government will convene a day-long conference to mark the tenth anniversary of the end of William H. Rehnquist’s 19 year service as Chief Justice of the United States. The gathering will be a chance to examine the legacy of Chief Justice Rehnquist’s jurisprudence, especially in the areas of federalism, separation of powers, and lawyering. The day will close with an informal reception and dinner for all conference attendees.”

The day’s topics will include:

  • federalism
  • the role of the Chief Justice
  • criminal procedure, and
  • the First Amendment and religion

Rehnquist Center banner logoSpeakers are slated to include practicing lawyers, law professors from the UA and around the country, as well as federal district and Circuit court judges.

You can read the complete program here.

And there is still time to register here.

Note that the event will be held at the Westward Look Resort & Spa (245 E. Ina Road, Tucson 85704). (A map is below.)

Questions? Contact Bernadette Wilkinson at bwilkins@email.arizona.edu or 520-626-1629.

Arizona UA Law School logo

A super-quick post today to mention a few events that are coming soon at the University of Arizona College of Law.

First up, two events that give the secret services a moment in the sun.

Ex-FBI agent Terry Hake speaks at UA Law School on January 20, 2015.

Terry Hake

On Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon (in UA Law Room 160), former FBI Agent Terry Hake will speak on “Going Undercover as an Attorney: Inside Operation Greylord.”

“In April 1980, after serving four years as a prosecutor, Terry Hake agreed to assist the FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Chicago in an investigation of the Cook County Court System. For three and one-half years, he worked undercover posing as a corrupt prosecutor and accepting bribes from attorneys and later as an attorney in private practice making payoffs to judges and court personnel for the dismissal of cases. The investigation, known as ‘Greylord,’ resulted in convictions of 18 judges, 57 lawyers, 10 law enforcement offices, and other court personnel. It remains one of the FBI’s most successful undercover investigations.”

Pizza lunch provided (not to undermine the drama of the preceding paragraph).

Online here are links to some case readings that Hake will touch upon.

Ex-CIA officer Michael Hurley speaks at UA Law on Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015.

Ex-CIA officer Michael Hurley will speak at UA Law on Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015.

Next, on Wednesday, Jan. 28, from 4:30-6:00 pm, ex-CIA officer Michael Hurley speaks on “Terrorism in America: What are the current threats, and is the U.S. government doing enough to defend us?”

Register here.

Finally, if you’ve never seen Ninth Circuit oral arguments, you really should get up to San Francisco occasionally. Or, you could simply head down to UA Law on Thursday, Jan. 29 (9:30 am – 11:30 am, Room 164, Ares Auditorium). That’s when the Circuit judges visit the law school “as part of its ongoing public education effort.”

9th_circuit_seal1This judicial visit is hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center on the Constitutional Structures of Government at the UA James E. Rogers College of Law.

Arguments will be heard in three cases:

  • Adobe Systems v. Joshua Christenson, 9:30-10:00 a.m.
  • Arizona Libertarian Party v. Ken Bennett, 10:00-10:30 a.m.
  • Mauricio Margain v. Elsa Ruiz-Bours, 10:30-11:00 a.m.

Q&A session from 11:00-11:30 a.m. More information and case materials are here.

“Seating is available first to those who have registered. Others are welcome to observe on a first-come, first-served basis as space is available.”

Read the security protocol and conduct guidelines” (no kidding) in their entirety here.

Soon, I will mention another UA event, this one in February honoring the anniversary of the prestigious Rehnquist Center.

Giving Tuesday 2014 logoA quick item to consider: #GivingTuesday is coming, and you can play a part.

Here is how the creators of the event describe it:

“We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.”

“It’s a simple idea. Just find a way for your family, your community, your company or your organization to come together to give something more. Then tell everyone you can about how you are giving. Join us and be a part of a global celebration of a new tradition of generosity.”

University of Arizona Law School logoLast year (the second year of the global effort), it was reported that more than 10,000 partner organizations in 50 states and over 15 countries participated. And from the University of Arizona College of Law, we hear that there is a new way to participate: Lawyers in Arizona—and across the country—will be asked to donate the first billable hour of their day to help fund law scholarships for the First Americans.

Here is more detail about the law school’s “First Hour for First Americans”:

  • The University of Arizona College of Law is focusing attention on #GivingTuesday 2014 to kick off a donation-matching fundraising drive for the Huerta Scholars Program, established at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law in Tucson in honor of Judge Lawrence Huerta, the first Native American to graduate from the College of Law (Class of ’53) and practice law in Arizona.
  • The “First Hour for the First Americans” scholarship drive for the Huerta Scholars Program will assist future generations of Native American law students to follow in this trailblazing first American’s footsteps at the University of Arizona.
  • Whether supporters are public defenders, partners in a large or small law firm or prosecutors, their donation of one hour of billable work to the “First Hour for the First Americans” scholarship drive will help bring needed support to a population with few resources and significant legal needs.

You can read more about the effort here and here.

University of Arizona Law School

The University of Arizona Law School will be the location of Arizona Supreme Court oral arguments on Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014.

Two fascinating issues will be addressed Thursday, November 6, when the Arizona Supreme Court holds oral arguments during a visit to Tucson. The arguments will occur at the UA James E. Rogers College of Law (1201 E. Speedway Blvd., Ares Auditorium, Room 164), from 2:00 to 4:00 pm.

The Court will hear appellate arguments in two cases (I have stated below the issue for each; for a fuller treatment, click on the cases):

Issue: Do individual legislators have standing to challenge a law simply by alleging that a supermajority was required for its passage?

Issue: Is a criminal defendant precluded from raising an ineffective assistance of counsel claim in a successive post-conviction relief proceeding when, without fault of his own, his prior two court-appointed attorneys failed to file a petition in the two prior post-conviction relief proceedings?

Arizona_Supreme_Court_SealThe travel to Tucson is part of the Court’s statewide public education effort.

As the law school reports:

“This judicial visit is hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center for the Constitutional Structures of Government at the James E. Rogers College of Law.”

Seating is limited and available to those who have preregistered here.

“Others are welcome on a first-come, first-serve basis as remaining space allows.”

Elizabeth F. Loftus

Elizabeth F. Loftus

This Wednesday, October 22, the University of Arizona law school co-hosts an event with cognitive psychologist Elizabeth Loftus. Speaking on her topic “The Memory Factory,” Loftus explores “how the mind is a ‘memory factory,’ one that can construct a richly detailed and emotionally vivid story, believed sincerely by the speaker although it is entirely false.”

Often described as a memory expert, Loftus’s own university page describes her own work this way: “Her experiments reveal how memories can be changed by things that we are told. Facts, ideas, suggestions and other post-event information can modify our memories. The legal field, so reliant on memories, has been a significant application of the memory research.”

You are likely familiar with her work via the pitched “memory wars” that waged in legal circles. Through her research on “the malleability of human memory,” Loftus examined eyewitness memory and what was called “the misinformation effect.” Numerous cases and headlines over the years have centered on how false and recovered memories may be created, even inadvertently; those dialogues played out most notoriously in childhood sexual abuse cases.

University of Arizona Law School logoThe free event is open to the public and does not require registration (though seating may be limited).

When: Wednesday, October 22, 7:00 pm (doors at 6:00)

Where: Ares Auditorium (room 164), James E. Rogers College of Law, 1201 E. Speedway, Tucson

As the organizers say, Loftus’s presentation is “part of ‘The Mind & The Law’ Lecture Series sponsored by the UA’s College of Science, the School of Mind, Brain, and Behavior’s Cognitive Science Program and the James E. Rogers College of Law.”

More information on the series is available here.

Former U.S. Rep. Barney Frank

Former U.S. Rep. Barney Frank

This Thursday, October 16, former U.S. Representative Barney Frank speaks at the University of Arizona Law School, where he delivers the annual McCormick Lecture.

His topic: “Why We Need More Government and How We Can Pay for It

The event is free and open to the public (though seats may be hard to come by; register here).

As the law school reports:

“Barney Frank served as United States Representative from Massachusetts for more than three decades, starting in 1981. An outspoken and deeply respected legislator, noted for his keen sense of humor, Frank has played a key role in some of the most important legislation of our country’s recent history, including the repeal of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’”

“As Chair of the House Financial Services Committee from 2007 to 2011, Frank helped craft the compromise bill to slow the tide of home mortgage foreclosures in the wake of the subprime mortgage crisis, as well as the subsequent $550 billion rescue plan, and the landmark Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act—the sweeping set of regulatory reforms named partly after Frank and signed into law in July 2010, to prevent the recurrence of the financial crisis.”

Arizona Law logoMore detail is here.

School representatives say that they anticipate a large crowd for the event. Capacity is limited to 300 registrants; the first 100 individuals to register will be seated in the Ares Auditorium, where Frank will deliver his lecture. The additional 200 people will be seated in adjacent overflow rooms to watch the lecture streamed live.

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