Think Millennials are a challenge? Here comes Generation Z.

Think Millennials are a challenge? Here comes Generation Z.

As we scan the business and law practice landscape, there is one segment that appears to be the most coveted and baffling. Of course, I’m talking about the Millennial generation, whose qualities and foibles are argued to be incredibly unique. To meet that generation, it is suggested, you need to relearn basic human interactions. And if you hope to engage that generation, entire paradigms must shift.

If you detect a touch of skepticism in my tone, you must possess a Boomer-trained sense of snark. And it’s true that my extensive interactions with Millennials tell me they seek transparency, candor, and generally less B.S. than previous generations may have been led to expect. Well, bully for them, to use an old-school phrase. (And bully for all of us older folks who agree with the Millennials on that.)

A free webinar on May 25 (1:00 pm EDT) will offer some insight into those colleagues who are of the younger generations. As organizers describe:

“One of the biggest challenges faced by business owners today is attracting and retaining great people. Millennials make up an enormous part of today’s workforce, and survey after survey finds that this generation values flexibility as much and sometimes more than compensation.”

Citrix Webinar Gene-Marks

Gene Marks

Columnist, author, business owner, and technology expert Gene Marks will cover:

  • How trends and regulations in minimum wage, paid time off, and overtime will impact your ability to find and motivate millennial employees.
  • The newest and innovative cloud based technologies that are helping companies of all sizes recruit, manage, compensate and make them more attractive to the millennial workforce.
  • The latest developments in healthcare reform that are most important to millennials and how smart employers are controlling their healthcare costs in 2016 while continuing to be competitive in the job market.

You can get more information and register here.

And in the meantime, I point you to three recent articles on communicating with younger colleagues, whether they be Millennials or in Gen Z. The first covers general best practices in communication.

The second two articles address challenges faced by bar associations and anyone who offers programming to a more demanding and (if you ask me) astute generation of attorneys. Thank you to Omnipress for sharing articles about offering education programs to Millennials in both continuing-education settings and in annual conferences.

Citrix Sharefile logo

This month: Free online learning from Citrix ShareFile

 

Food trucks at the Downtown Phoenix Public Market.

Food trucks at the Downtown Phoenix Public Market.

Food-truck law? Who knew?

That was the guiding theme of my morning yesterday, as I sat in a CLE on the topic. I recommended it to you before, and I was happy to listen as attendees got legal, business and marketing advice on the topic of food trucks. Among the audience members were lawyers (who may have their own truck-ish aspirations) and high school students who are aiming for four-wheeled businesses.

The information provided was terrific … but let me get to the delicious part. For after the morning CLE, attendees could gather outside, where the marvelous Short Leash Hot Dogs and Rollover Doughnuts had rolled up to provide lunch.

In case you haven’t been paying attention: This is how life is supposed to be.

Photos of the noshing and learning below. (Click to biggify.)

State Bar of Arizona Leadership Institute header

Here is some news from the State Bar of Arizona. The Bar Leadership Institute has been a remarkable program for years now. It may be a great fit for you or another attorney you know.

The Bar Leadership Institute is a nine-month professional development program beginning in September 2015. The goal of the program is to foster the professional growth and enhance the leadership skills of a diverse and inclusive group of lawyers.

Attorneys selected to participate receive:

  • Up to two years of CLE credit.
  • Leadership training and legal practice education in an experiential and mentoring learning environment.
  • Opportunities to foster relationships within the State Bar of Arizona, partner bar associations, government and community leaders.

Complete your application here.

The application deadline is Friday, June 19, 2015.

Arizona Summit Law professors Jalae Ulicki (left) and Penny Willrich with Arizona Attorney Editor Tim Eigo, Jan. 20, 2015, after taping of an educational video on mediation as a healing art.

Arizona Summit Law professors Jalae Ulicki (left) and Penny Willrich with Arizona Attorney Editor Tim Eigo, Jan. 20, 2015, after taping of an educational video on mediation as a healing art.

Last week, I got to engage in what has become a highlight of my month: a dialogue with some current Arizona Attorney authors.

The point of the very enjoyable exercise is to create a short video. This partnership with the State Bar of Arizona CLE Department is called “CLE Snippets,” and this month’s authors are Professors Penny Willrich and Jalae Ulicki, both of the Arizona Summit Law School.

The way it works is this: I provide the list of articles for the upcoming month’s issue and chat with Jenn Sonier in the CLE Department. After a little collaboration, we agree on what topic may lend itself well to a brief Q&A video. And the next time we meet in the CLE Center, I try to dress nice, the authors arrive, and Jenn tapes us in riveting conversation.

Well, that’s the plan. Authors Willrich and Ulicki certainly held up their end of the bargain, offering great insight as we discussed their article titled “Lessons Learned From Peacemaking: Mediation as a Healing Art.”

(In what’s become a sort-of tradition, I try to snap a selfie with the authors. This month, the terrific Jenn Sonier did the photographic honors, above.)

I’ll share a link when it’s available. But in the meantime, thank you to our talented authors for taking the time to share their thoughts about an important topic.

The President's recent Executive Order on immigration may provide more questions than answers for immigration attorneys ... and their clients.

The President’s recent Executive Order on immigration may provide more questions than answers for immigration attorneys … and their clients.

Recently, I have mentioned some efforts by the State Bar of Arizona to provide guidance in the wake of the President’s Executive Order on immigration. And there will be more news on that front later this week (maybe even tomorrow).

In the meantime, I’m pleased to say that there is so much on offer that I entirely missed a 1.5-hour seminar on the topic offered by the CLE Department (and yes, it’s still available online).

Titled (no surprise), The President’s Immigration Accountability Executive Actions,” it is led by three attorneys as faculty: Ayensa Millan, Alma Montes de Oca, and Ruben Reyes.

Topics include:

  • Enforcement Priorities
  • Deferred Action for Parents (DAP)
  • Expansion of DACA
  • New U/T Visas
  • 601a Waivers
  • Parole in Place
  • Visa Modernization

The seminar is available here.

U.S. Supreme_Court

This Wednesday, September 17, we get another in a popular series of analyses from the recent U.S. Supreme Court Term.

Organized by the State Bar CLE folks, it will include the thoughts of Judge George Anagnost as moderator, as well as panelists ASU Law Professor Paul Bender, Arizona Summit Law Professor Dave Cole, and attorney–scholar Bob McWhirter.

As they describe it:

“This symposium will review significant cases for the October 2013 Term including the Hobby Lobby and the Town of Greece case. The program will feature scholars on the Court focusing on cases presenting important questions of law, comments on individual justices’ legal perspectives, and a preview of petitions for certiorari for this coming October Term 2014.”

More information is here. I hope to see you there.

Our July/August 2014 cover story (and now a video): Changes to the complaint process at the Ariz. Registrar of Contractors

Our July/August 2014 cover story (and now a video): Changes to the complaint process at the Ariz. Registrar of Contractors

Get ready to snippet. (snippet good)

No, this is not a Nip/Tuck episode (or a Devo song), but an opportunity to view an educational video (and maybe get a little CLE).

As I mentioned last month, Arizona Attorney Magazine is participating in a new venture with the State Bar of Arizona CLE folks. “CLE Snippets” are brief videos that let you hear from an author of an article in the coming month’s magazine.

In July, I had the chance to speak with Matt Meaker (right) about his terrific cover story. (This is just a screen-shot. Want to watch? Click the link below.)

In July, I had the chance to speak with Matt Meaker (right) about his terrific cover story. (This is just a screen-shot. Want to watch? Click the link below.)

When I wrote about this before, I promised (threatened) to provide a link to the teaser. So here it is. If you like it, please feel free to share it around. If you don’t, well, let’s pretend this never happened.

cle snippets teaser logo. This teaser signifies a new and innovative way to combine magazine content with online learning.Thank you again to Matt Meaker of Sacks Tierney for his contribution on changes at the Arizona Registrar of Contractors.

Yesterday, an author and I taped another snippet, which is on compliance (or not) with the Affordable Care Act. But more on that later.

Westin 3 Westin La Paloma Resort in TucsonHere is the last in a series of posts that lets Convention seminar chairs speak for themselves. In advance of the Bar Convention, I contacted seminar chairs seeking their response to four questions about their upcoming panel. Here are the questions I sent:

  • Who should attend this seminar?
  • What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?
  • How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)
  • What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Today, I share the responses of those whose seminars are calendared for this afternoon, Friday, June 13. (Note: Not all seminar chairs responded.) Click on the seminar title to read more detail as published in the Convention brochure.

Friday, June 13, 2:00 pm

F-38: Mr. Smith Goes to Tucson

Co-chair: Alan Baskin

Who should attend this seminar?

Alan Baskin

Alan Baskin

Anyone who is interested in business, securities law, current events, and/or the impact and application of or potential changes to the JOBS Act.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

Attendees will hear from Congressman David Schweikert, one of the primary authors of the JOBS Act.  What better way to learn?

Is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

Yes.  The seminar involves the practical application of recent and important legislation. A fabulous opportunity to see if the Act has turned out as expected, learn of any unexpected pitfalls, and hear about what changes may be coming.

Friday, June 13, 2:00 pm

F-40: Embracing the Future of Construction

Chair: Rick Erickson

Who should attend this seminar?

Attorneys interested in construction design, financing, planning, development, administration and project delivery should attend this seminar.  In addition, attorneys should attend if they have an interest in construction industry claims, including litigation of lien disputes, breach of contract, design and construction defects, project delays and licensing complaints against contractors.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

Rick Erickson

Rick Erickson

Lawyers will better understand how builders and developers achieve success in Arizona and how they rely on their attorneys to succeed.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

The seminar will focus on some of the most recognized projects in Arizona, including Intel Fab 42 in Chandler, University of Arizona Behavioral Sciences in Phoenix, Beal Derkenne’s student towers at UofA and ASU, Caliente’s work on Chase Field and numerous other buildings and Baker Concrete’s role in major projects for Target and other private developers.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

The most common misconception is that lawyers think they know what construction clients really want.  This seminar offers an opportunity to learn how to avoid giving construction clients what they don’t want.

 

2014 State Bar of Arizona Convention brochure cover hires_optHere is another post that lets Convention seminar chairs speak for themselves. In advance of the Bar Convention, I contacted seminar chairs seeking their response to four questions about their upcoming panel. Here are the questions I sent:

  • Who should attend this seminar?
  • What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?
  • How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)
  • What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Today, I share the responses of those whose seminars are calendared for tomorrow morning, Friday, June 13. (Note: Not all seminar chairs responded.) Click on the seminar title to read more detail as published in the Convention brochure.

A final post will share the responses from the Friday afternoon chairs.

Friday, June 13, 8:45 am

F-33: Criminal Risks in Real Estate Deals

Chair: James A. Craft, Apogee Physicians

Who should attend this seminar?

James Craft

James Craft

Criminal defense counsel, real estate transactions counsel and antitrust counsel.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

In real estate deals and financing, what practices are being targeted today by state and federal prosecutors?

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

In Arizona, real estate scams have a colorful history. The 2008 crash created new enforcement priorities.  And buyer collusion in foreclosure and tax auctions became a national problem, according to recent DOJ prosecutions – including a jury trial recently in Sacrmento.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

“Joint ventures” to purchase real estate at a private or public auction are in some situations bid-rigging, which is a felony.

Friday, June 13, 8:45 am

F-34: ENRLS offers two seminars on Friday morning at the State Bar Conference. The first seminar, titled “Environmental Law: Where we are,”  will feature a panel of experienced environmental attorneys who will be discussing developments in the law for air quality, hazardous waste cleanups, water quality and NEPA.

Chair: Sonia Overholser, Department of the Interior, Phoenix Solicitor’s Office

Who should attend?

We tailor this seminar for attorneys and consultants who work in the area of air or water quality compliance, who have some responsibility for hazardous waste clean ups, or who advise or implement the NEPA process, but this seminar is also suitable for any attorneys or consultants who want to stay current in these areas for any reason.

What is the main takeaway?

Sonia Overholser

Sonia Overholser

Attorneys or consultants who attend this seminar will walk away knowing the very latest developments in each of these areas.

How is it timely?

Air and water quality, hazardous waste clean ups, and NEPA are complex legal areas that are constantly evolving and developing.  For this reason, we discuss the top developments in the last year so we can focus on the cutting edge of the law in each area.

What are some common misconceptions?

I believe it is a misconception to believe that environmental law has not changed from the way it was taught in law schools, if it was taught in law school.  In American legal jurisprudence, environmental law remains relatively young and it has evolved and developed to keep pace with developments in manufacturing and industrial processes, energy generation, land use planning, and scientific improvements for sustaining clean land, air, and water hand in hand with economic development.

Friday, June 13, 10:30 am

F-35: The second seminar offered by ENRLS on Friday morning is titled “Environmental Law: Where are we going?”

Chair: Sonia Overholser, Department of the Interior, Phoenix Solicitor’s Office

Who should attend?

In addition to attorneys or consultants who work in the area of solid or hazardous waste, air or water quality, or NEPA, this seminar would appeal to attorneys or consultants who have an interest in getting a glimpse at where the law might be headed in these areas.  This would be critical to any attorney or consultant working with clients who might be encountering any of these areas in the future.

What is the main takeaway?

No one can predict the future, but in this panel we have assembled top attorneys from private practice and the federal and state regulatory areas, as well as an environmental consultant, to share their observations about the major future trends in environmental law.

How is it timely?

Drought; an increasing awareness of climate change; the promises of energy independence; and technological developments transforming the work place are all recent trends that implicate environmental law and create questions about how the law will develop and evolve.

What are some common misconceptions?

I believe that many miss the connection between environmental law and many of the major social and economic trends that have dominated the last decade.  It may be easy to spot the relationship between energy generation and environmental law, but there are multiple other connections that may not be perceived as readily.  Environmental law remains a critical component for anyone who anticipates playing a role in the major trends of these times.

Friday, June 13, 8:45 am

F-36: Evidence Law Update

Co-chair: Hon. Sam Thumma

Who should attend?

Our program is on evidence and the target audience is litigators of all kind and other lawyers who have matters that may end up in litigation.

What is the main takeaway?

Hon. Sam Thumma

Hon. Sam Thumma

The take away will be an overview of recent significant evidence cases and rules changes, as well as a more detailed discussion of selected areas of evidence law, and how to handle application of the Arizona Rules of Evidence to facts through a few dozen hypotheticals with responders, tabulated electronically and discussed with model answers.

How is the program timely?

The program is timely on that it will discuss up to date evidence developments for use in evidentiary hearings of all types.

What are some common misperceptions?

There are many misconceptions about the law of evidence.  Ones we will address include privilege issues, expert testimony and the hearsay rule and its exceptions.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-44: Lessons From Employment Law

Co-chair: Joe Kroeger

Who should attend this seminar?

Joe Kroeger

Joe Kroeger

This seminar is for the attorney engaged in the practice of labor and employment law.  Whether you represent employees or employers, are in private practice, work for the government, or serve as an in-house attorney, the program will provide updates and offer information that is immediately relevant to your labor and employment practice.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

This year, attendees will walk away with an improved understanding of the key emerging trends impacting their practice – including new initiatives impacting both union and non-union employers at the National Labor Relations Board, current employment issues impacting the sports world, workplace privacy and data security in the digital age, the continued move towards arbitration and evaluating the pros and cons of arbitration in the workplace, and the top five lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues facing employment lawyers.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

The program centers on several of the most relevant trends and issues facing the practice today. The panelists will focus on the future of our practice in the ever-shifting labor and employment landscape and also evaluate the lessons we have learned from the past.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Many attorneys, and certainly their clients, continue to operate under the misperception that the National Labor Relations Act only applies to unions and unionized companies.  Increasingly, the NLRB and the courts are applying the NLRB to non-unionized workforces in ever expanding ways.  This seminar will help to educate practitioners as to this developing area, as well as the rapidly developing areas of privacy and data protection and LBGT issues.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-45: Juvenile Law in the Digital Age

Co-chair: Gaylene Morgan

Who should attend this seminar?

  • Anyone interested in juvenile law, using technology in the practice of law, or bullying.
  • Of particular interest to:
  • Attorneys representing children and parents in dependency actions
  • Guardians Ad Litem for children
  • Assistant Attorneys General representing CPS
  • Attorneys representing juveniles or the State in delinquency actions
  • Family Law or other attorneys wanting to know more about juvenile law

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

CURRENT information regarding juvenile law practice:

  • Appellate and Legislative Updates (Update on proposed 2014 Special Session legislation creating a new child welfare agency)
  • Using technology in the practice of juvenile law
  • What’s being done about bullying?  What do kids think about bullying—from the teen panel.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

  • The digital age is changing the way that lawyers practice and  the JLS seminar will provide up-to-date information critical to
  • Lawyers to keep pace with the changes. The legislative update will include information on the 2014 Legislative Special Session
  • The creation of a new stand-alone child welfare agency

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

That the Juvenile Law Section seminar is only of interest to those practicing in the juvenile law area.  Information on technology in the practice of law is of interest and can benefit any lawyer and the bullying topic should be of interest to all.  Hearing from teens about the bullying going on over social media and what they think of it is information not readily available.  The youth panel is always captivating and thought-provoking.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-47: Family Law and the Brain, 9:45 am session

Responded: Robert Barrasso

Who should attend?

Anyone interested in family law should attend this seminar.

What is the one main takeaway?

Robert Barrasso

Robert Barrasso

The one main take away would be how modern brain science information can help the family law practitioner.

Why is this seminar timely?

This seminar is timely because we are going to be hearing an actual court of appeals legal argument on a complicated property issue that will result in new case law. It is also timely because we will be hearing from three different University of Arizona professors about the leading research in brain science.

What is the most common misperception?

The most common misconception is that brain science has nothing to do with family law.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-47: Family Law and the Brain, 2:00 pm session

Responses by: Patricia Green

Who should attend this seminar?

Any attorney practicing or interested in practicing family law, and who desires to increase their knowledge of the various topics identified in the brochure.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

This seminar will present a rare opportunity to see the Court of Appeals in action – live oral argument on a current family law case – while also giving seminar attendees an opportunity to identify how they would rule on the case.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Two sessions of the seminar will focus on the brain and have presentations from non-lawyers.  These sessions, in particular, are intended to assist attorneys in better understanding brain function for clients, witnesses and judges.

2014 State Bar of Arizona Convention brochure cover hires_optHere is another post that lets Convention seminar chairs speak for themselves. In advance of the Bar Convention, I contacted seminar chairs seeking their response to four questions about their upcoming panel. Here are the questions I sent:

  • Who should attend this seminar?
  • What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?
  • How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)
  • What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Last evening, I shared the responses of those whose seminars are calendared for the morning of Thursday, June 12. (Note: Not all seminar chairs responded.) Click on the seminar title to read more detail as published in the Convention brochure.

What follows are the seminar responses I received for the Thursday afternoon programs.

Thursday, June 12, 2:00 pm

T-24: What Every Lawyer Should Know About the Client Protection Fund

Chair: Chas Wirken, Gust Rosenfeld

Who should attend this seminar?

Chas Wirken

Chas Wirken

Lawyers who represent individuals.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

A reminder that the Client Protection Fund is available to reimburse clients harmed by dishonest lawyers.

How is this seminar timely?

It will start and end on time. Seriously, dishonest lawyers are victimizing clients more often.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Which claimants and what claims are eligible for reimbursement.

Thursday, June 12, 2:00 pm

T-25: Go Green. Save Green.

Chair: Sharon W. Ng,Stinson Leonard Street LLP

Who should attend this seminar?

Sharon Ng

Sharon Ng

Any individual will find this seminar rewarding who is (i) interested in learning how to make his or her workplace more environmentally-friendly and/or (ii) would like to hear both non-lawyers and lawyers engage in a discussion regarding his or her respective sustainability efforts.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

The participant will gain valuable insight on how to integrate sustainability into his or her practice and the cost-saving benefits of the same.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

Not only will the participant learn how to weave sustainability into his or her practice, but the suggestions the seminar will address will also touch upon a more mobile and less-paper reliant practice, which is becoming more common in the legal world.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Sustainability does not require significant changes to a lawyer’s practice; it’s accessible and worth it.

Thursday, June 12, 2:00 pm

T-27: Elder Law and Special Needs Planning; Post-DOMA Planning

Co-Chair: Mark Theut, Theut, Theut & Theut PC

Who should attend this seminar?

Estate planners, attorneys who represent guardians and/or conservators and/or fiduciaries, attorneys who probate estates, fiduciaries and paralegals.

How is this seminar timely?

1. It will raise issues in estate planning under the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) such as who are the intestate heirs, who has priority to act as guardian/conservator for a partner or minor child, etc.  2.  The seminar will demonstrate how to effectively use mediation in probate and mental health cases, 3. Issues will also be covered related to the Affordable Care Act in estate planning, including the drafting of special needs trusts as well as the handling of guardianship and conservatorship cases and planning for small business owners, and 4.  There will also be a presentation regarding the ethical issues in the practice of estate planning, elder law and probate and liability concerns when representing fiduciaries as trustees, personal representatives, guardians, and conservators, and the steps to take by a practitioner confronted by claims of malpractice.

Thursday, June 12, 2:00 pm

T-28: Unauthorized Practice of Law in Arizona

Response by: Frankie Adamo

Who should attend this seminar?

Frank Adamo

Frank Adamo

All members of the State Bar should attend, because they probably encounter UPL practitioners but either tolerate interacting with them or are unaware of the harm or of how to report it.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

The distinction between the authority of non-lawyers and out-of-state lawyers to legally provide services, on the one hand, and the harm to the public and the profession that comes from unauthorized practitioners.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

Nationally, aggressive efforts are underway to allow non-lawyers to provide many of the services typically reserved for lawyers.  We need well-informed members to participate meaningfully in this dialogue, to ensure that protections for the public are in place, and that the services that should be reserved for licensed members are safeguarded.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

That, being licensed, they do not need to know about UPL. “That must be someone else’s problem.”