Pro Bono


Our April 2016 issue features the stories of a small number of Arizona lawyers committed to access to justice through pro bono service.

Our April 2016 issue features the stories of a small number of Arizona lawyers committed to access to justice through pro bono service.

I fear I let a great April event fly by without properly acknowledging it—and the accomplishments of so many great attorneys.

The April issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine featured Access to Justice advocates—attorneys selected by the state’s VLPs (Volunteer Lawyers Programs) for their unstinting commitment to offering pro bono service.

The issue also allowed me to praise some law students from the University of Arizona for their accomplishments in a writing competition I was pleased to judge.

Here, I reprint my column and their photo. And be sure to read about all the A2J Advocates here.

Last month in this space, I wrote about courage and what it requires of us, in our choices and in our commitment to an accurate retelling of history.

Some of you have contacted me with feedback and insight about my words. If you haven’t, please feel free to read the column (http://ow.ly/Z1XfW) and send me your thoughts.

As I said there, it’s great when we can spot courage. But advocating for it and advancing it? That’s the role of leaders.

This month, we’re all about those courageous leaders. Our cover and story beginning on page 18 offer legal exemplars. In a month focused on access to justice, we raise a toast to lawyers who step into the breach to fill unfilled needs.

And in law school, leadership may be nurtured, as well.

As in years past, I’m privileged to report on some leaders-in-training, law students who prevailed in a rigorous writing competition at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. Congratulations to: Jillian Andrews (2L), first place ($2,500 award); Max Bradley (1L), second place ($1,500); Julie Pack (1L), third place ($1,000); and Kayla Bernays (1L), honorable mention ($750).

Richard Grand UA Law School legal writing awards 2016-page0001

As a competition judge, I can tell you that their work was moving and compelling—exactly what I would have expected!

Though I’m always happy to serve as a judge, I have nothing to do with the annual event’s theme or approach, which is developed by talented law school faculty. And so I was delighted to see the selected topic this year—courage.

And that makes sense, as the competition is named for Arizona lawyer Richard Grand, who never shrank from a fight. As the school describes him:

Over the course of his five-decade-long career, Tucson attorney Richard Grand worked tirelessly to achieve justice for his clients. His clients were often ordinary people who had suffered extraordinary injuries. The opposing parties were often large corporations and powerful insurance companies. Mr. Grand never retired, and he handled cases up until the last day of his life. Mr. Grand valued competence, communication, and courage.

Richard died in 2013. He would have been 86 this year, and he was a zealous advocate when advocates were allowed to be zealous. He and his wonderful wife Marcia funded (and continue to fund and inspire) this writing endeavor.

Congratulations to those lawyers and law students, past and present, who aim to close the justice gap.

pro bono gavelToday, here is some news you may be able to use—and definitely news you can share. (And please do!)

The State Bar of Arizona is hosting its fifth annual Law Day Legal Aid Clinics this coming Saturday, April 30, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. This valuable event has become one of the Bar’s signature access to justice events.

Law Day 2016 poster in english v2-page0001Co-hosting the event with the State Bar are ABC15 and Univision Arizona.

What happens at the event? Volunteer lawyers will provide free legal consultations on the following topics: divorce and child support/custody, bankruptcy and foreclosure, wills and trusts, and immigration.

And how has the Bar made the day even more accessible? By providing the consultations at two locations: At the Bar offices in Phoenix and at Glendale Community College. Spanish-speaking translators will be available.

All the details, including specific addresses, are here. Or call 602-340-7337 for more information.

Law Day 2016 poster in spanish-page-0_opt

And again, please share this with whomever you think could benefit.

lawyers on call

Next Tuesday, February 2, the State Bar and 12News are co-sponsoring a lawyer call-in program that may benefit someone you know—or it may even benefit you!

12 News logoThe topic for Lawyers on Call that night will be estate planning, wills and trusts. It runs from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. that evening, and the call-in number is 602-258-1212. More detail is here.

After the event, I’ll share the names of the lawyers who generously gave of their time at the event.

Quarles & Brady folks at Capitol School, Oct. 30, 2015.

Quarles & Brady folks at Capitol School, Oct. 30, 2015.

News from the Phoenix office of Quarles & Brady:

On Friday, Oct. 30, nearly two dozen members of Quarles & Brady’s Phoenix office joined together to volunteer their time as “homeroom parents” at the Capitol School’s annual Fall Celebration. This was the first of three events during the 2015–2016 school year in which attorneys and staff will volunteer their team to the Capitol School, just west of downtown Phoenix, providing both treats and interactive activities to engage students from Kindergarten to sixth grade.

“Capitol Elementary School strives to create a healthy learning environment where students are given a quality education that includes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become lifelong learners and responsible citizens—we respect that and want to do everything we can to help,” said Scott Jenkins, a partner in the Phoenix office who even brought his own children to volunteer with the team. “In addition to rolling up our sleeves with the kids, the firm also fundraises to support and put on special school events, including field trips to Boston and Washington, D.C.”

According to Jenkins, partnership between Quarles & Brady and the Capitol School dates back a quarter century.

“In 1990, Quarles & Brady set out to find a community project that would provide sustainable, ongoing volunteerism to bring their firm members together with purpose beyond business,” said Jenkins. “With so many parents and grandparents working at the firm, focusing on children and education was a priority.”

While the Capitol School program kicked off with the attorneys and staff putting on homeroom class parties, the partnership quickly evolved into one that included reading and writing assistance, mentorship, fundraising, financial support to students’ families when in crisis, and even a donation to help remodel the school’s media center.

This effort is one of many the local office takes part in through its Quarles Cares community relations program, which is focused on connecting directly with local communities to understand the residents’ needs. Through the volunteer initiatives, attorneys and staff commit themselves personally to civic and charitable efforts, and their personal growth is reflected in the workplace. More information is here.

Tile mural dedicated by Capitol School to Quarles & Brady.

Tile mural dedicated by Capitol School to Quarles & Brady.

State Bar of Arizona lawyers answer family-law questions, Nov. 10, 2015.

State Bar of Arizona lawyers answer family-law questions, Nov. 10, 2015.

On Tuesday, November 10, the State Bar of Arizona and 12 News hosted the Lawyers on Call public service program. There, eight attorneys volunteered their time and expertise to answer viewers’ questions on family law issues.

The following update comes from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez:

State Bar of Arizona SBA_Logo_ColorEight attorneys volunteered their time:

  • Taylor Anderson, Anderson & Cabrera Law Group
  • Ryan Borges, The Borges Law Firm
  • Rebecca Browning, Browning Law Office
  • Tabitha Cabrera, Anderson & Cabrera Law Group
  • Craig Cherny, Canterbury Law Group
  • Kina Harding, The Harding Firm
  • Daniel Rodriguez, Diaz, Rodriguez & Associates
  • Jennifer Shick, Shick Law Offices

12 News logoThe lawyers answered 156 calls during the two-hour phone bank.

Sample consumer questions:

  • How do I file for a divorce? Do I need an attorney?
  • Can I stop paying alimony/spousal support?
  • How long do I have to be married to get alimony/spousal support?
  • How do I enforce court-ordered child support? Can I modify child support?
  • How do I modify a parenting plan/parenting time?
  • Do I have any rights as a grandparent?

Four of the eight attorneys were first-time volunteers. Congratulations and thanks to all who participated.

Tim Hogan speaks at the University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Tim Hogan speaks at the University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Last week, an organization that does great legal work took a moment—as it does every year—to honor a lawyer for work that goes above and beyond.

Congratulations to the William E. Morris Institute for Justice for taking that moment on Thursday, October 29, to honor Tim Hogan, Executive Director of the Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest.

The event at the University Club was the Morris Institute’s annual Phoenix fundraiser, but it was also an opportunity to hear from some of our legal community’s smartest folks as they weighed in on Tim and his impressive legal career.

Among those who spoke was the Sierra Club’s Sandy Bahr, who recounted numerous times Hogan had collaborated with others on important litigation.

You probably couldn’t put it better than Bahr did as she said, “Tim is a friend to Arizona.”

Sandy Bahr, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Sandy Bahr, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Paul Eckstein spoke warmly about Tim Hogan, “the legal polymath.” Eckstein said there’s hardly an area of law Hogan hasn’t touched, including education, finance, school funding, consumer protection, utility rates, environmental protection, the constitutionality of laws (I stopped writing after a while!).

Eckstein reminded attendees that “60 Minutes is in the waiting room” were once the words most feared by powerful people. Smiling, Eckstein said that dreaded sentence has been replaced by “Tim Hogan has just sued us.”

Paul Eckstein, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Paul Eckstein, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

When Hogan rose to offer his obligatory remarks, the typically taciturn attorney would have none of it. He reminded listeners that, “We’re all in this together, and we all contribute to each others’ successes.”

Virtually every lawsuit named that evening, Hogan said, was a collaboration between organizations and multiple lawyers. In particular, Hogan praised the Morris Institute’s Ellen Katz, who has advanced so many cases and causes in Arizona.

William E. Morris Institute for Justice logoHogan’s wry sense of humor was on display, though, when he admitted it was sometimes necessary for him to be absent from settlement discussions, as “Some other folks just self-incinerate when they see me.”

He also reminded the group that he routinely gives Ellen Katz a hard time for not charging for this annual event. (Her response, as always: a smile.)

The experienced Hogan used his remarks to tell attendees that they needed to contribute however they could, and to step up to help communities with little: “Next to English-language learners,” Hogan said, “poor people are probably those who are most despised at the Arizona Legislature.”

In the same week, Tim Hogan was inducted into the Maricopa County Bar Association Hall of Fame. Congratulations again to Tim and the many communities his work benefits.

Nonprofit boards generally don't look like this anymore. But if they did, can you spot the attorney?

Nonprofit boards generally don’t look like this anymore (if they ever did). But if they did, can you spot the attorney?

As far back as I can recall (and that recall gets shorter every day), lawyers have played a valuable role on the boards of nonprofits. They could lend a hand—hopefully not opining beyond their skill-level—while getting better known in the community. Win–win.

It seems to me that as law practice has gotten tougher and more challenge-filled, those attorneys who seek out board positions has decreased. If I’m right, that would be unfortunate, as nonprofit organizations do more and more of the heavy lifting in our society, and they need more and more specialized services. Lawyers can still be of service.

That challenge was in mind when I came across a meeting notice (from the ever-informative Arizona Asian American Bar Association) about a “nonprofit board speed networking event.”

Here’s their description: “Typically it is very hard to just jump on an organization board, but there are hundreds of nonprofits in the Valley seeking innovators and professionals like you to help them build their organizational capacity.”

Foundation for Senior Living FSL-logoSo true, so why not attend the event tomorrow?

Hosted by Polsinelli Law Firm, the event occurs Thursday, October 29, from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The special-guest moderator is Tom Egan, President and CEO of the Foundation for Senior Living, who “will share how organizations and board members can build strong partnerships to help grow the organization and your professional skills and network.”

And when event organizers say “speed,” they mean it. Attendees will spend three to five minutes learning about each of the nonprofit’s programs and services. Who knows? You may feel a deep connection that you’ll want to act upon.

Where: Polsinelli Law Firm (at Cityscape in downtown Phoenix), 1 E. Washington St. #1200, Phoenix, AZ 85004

For additional information, email attorney Nicole Ong at nicole.ong@dlapiper.com.

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