Notable Supreme Court cases to be discussed at Rehnquist Center Constitution Day Program on September 21.

Notable Supreme Court cases to be discussed at Rehnquist Center Constitution Day Program on September 21.

Whenever I mention Constitution Day, some legal wag is bound to contact me to remind, “But Tim, every day is Constitution Day!”

To that I say, huzzah for your enthusiasm. But accuracy compels me to remind in return: Constitution Day falls in September every year, your eager patriotism notwithstanding.

For the truly eager (and patriotic), I recommend to you the Constitution Day program planned at the Rehnquist Center at the University of Arizona College of Law. It will be held next Monday, September 21, from 1:00 to 4:30 pm.

Registration (free!) is here.

Last year, I was able to attend in person. (No such luck this year.) Here’s my story from that compelling panel discussion.

As organizers describe next Monday’s event:

The panel discussion features legal experts who will review some of the major cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the 2014 term.

Panelists include:

The moderator will once again be the law school’s Professor David Marcus.

Hosted by the William H. Rehnquist Center in the UA James E. Rogers College of Law, the event will feature a panel of legal experts reviewing notable cases decided by the United States Supreme Court during the 2014 Term.

What will they discuss? Here are some of the seminal decisions they’ll cover:

  • King v. Burwell, in which the Supreme Court upheld a provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that offers tax credits to individuals who purchase health insurance through federal exchanges.
  • Horne v. Department of Agriculture, a takings case involving the Fifth Amendment and the government’s responsibility to pay just compensation when it takes personal property.
  • Obergefell v. Hodges, in which the court held that same-sex couples’ right to marry is guaranteed under the Fourteenth Amendment.
  • Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, in which the court found that Arizona voters have the right to transfer redistricting power from the state legislature to an independent commission.

As always, if you attend and take any photos or decide you’d like to write a brief summary of the highlights, I’d be happy to chart about a guest blog post. Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

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