Yes, a good performance is expected here. But you may be asked to deliver great, persuasive results in venues of every size.

Yes, a good performance is expected here. But you may be asked to deliver great, persuasive results in venues of every size.

How many of us have had the pleasure to stand on stage and perform?

Pretty much all of us, if we understand that to include appearing in court, before a board or commission—or even before a community organization.

“Perform” may not be a word you’re comfortable using in regard to your own presentation. But thinking of it that way may have a freeing influence on the results you get—and it may lead to more satisfaction in you and your listeners. And maybe in your clients.

I was thinking of this because this Friday, a State Bar educational seminar features Marc Bauman as a faculty member. Among other things, he is an instructor and consultant who heads up Bauman Trial Consulting LLC.

His seminar is titled “Persuasion Arts in Action,” and a few things distinguish it from the mass of learning opportunities.

First, it’s being taught workshop-style—so attendees will participate. Second, the attendee numbers are being kept low deliberately, to maximize everyone’s experience.

Instructor and trial consultant Marc Bauman

Instructor and trial consultant Marc Bauman

Here’s the link to the event, where you also can register. There may still be openings.

But third: I’ve had the pleasure to speak at length with Marc a few times (this last time at the grand opening of the ASU Beus Center for Law and Society), and I am confident he can help your presentation mojo. He is a great listener, and he knows how to offer compassionate and constructive feedback. His goal is not to make all speakers the same—or to make them him—but to help you become the best advocate for your client.

As Marc describes Friday’s offering:

“Existing somewhere between science and art, effective courtroom communication is a craft. The best trial attorneys realize this. As an experienced attorney, you may know how to make a perfect record and you may have prepared your case fact pattern. However, making a perfect record and presenting the facts of your case to a jury is not enough. Your client’s story needs to be crafted and presented with precision and investment.”

And here is a description of the seminar’s goals:

  1. Be more comfortable in front of a jury while standing, speaking, moving, gesturing, demonstrating exhibits and presenting graphics.
  2. Clarify your client’s case narrative and key themes.
  3. Strengthen your presentation skills while developing clear, meaningful connections with members of the jury, empowering them to deliberate on behalf of your client.
  4. Gain an important edge in the courtroom increasing your chances of a positive verdict for your client.
  5. Prepare for depositions and jury trials with the confidence you, your witnesses and most importantly, your clients deserve.

As the link indicates, he’d like you to arrive Friday with an opening statement about one minute in length. Easy squeezy, right?

This kind of learning is probably best conveyed as Marc will do it—in person. But I’m still thinking on how a print magazine like Arizona Attorney can transmit this kind of trial practice insight. If you have ideas, or your own experience with how acting and the dramatic arts have helped your own law practice, contact me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

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