Think creative life, think Iggy Pop. Iggy Pop in May 2016 Arizona Attorney Magazine-page0001

Think creative life, think Iggy Pop.

Before we exit May, I share with you my editor’s letter from that issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine. It referred to the incredible lawyer–artists who populate the issue’s pages, comprising our annual Creative Arts Competition (See the whole issue here). What do you think of this year’s amazing artists? And what role do artistic interests play in your own life? Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

In Chicago back in the late ‘80s, I had a friend who attended an Iggy Pop concert. Through strategy and sharp elbows, she managed to reach the front ranks of the pulsating crowd and stand—OK, quake with joy—right next to the stage. During the show, she reports, Iggy knelt down and licked her palm. Because Iggy.

She claimed she would never again wash that hand. In the office, she would hold out the sacred appendage, aimed skyward for all to see, the invisible stigmata transporting her to new heights.

What makes someone set aside good sense and hygiene for its colorful opposite, I wondered? What neurons does Iggy Pop make pop in people’s brains?

May_2016 Arizona Attorney Magazine coverI was reminded of that graphic story of palm-love as we prepared this issue—and as I read a magazine (of course) published by American Airlines. “American Way” is beautiful (even if it has a vaguely unsettling title). But its beauty is more than skin-deep, for within the current issue is a Q&A with two rock stars, one of whom is the craggy, talented, and ever-punkish Iggy.

He was spreading the word about a musical collaboration with Josh Homme, founder of Queens of the Stone Age. And as impressive as Iggy Pop may be, I was struck by one of Homme’s insights:

“I’ve always loved infiltration. To me, that’s what punk rock has always been about: going where you don’t belong without anyone noticing until it’s too late. … It’s a pleasure to wander in this historic place, set up shop and say, ‘The elegant scumbags are in town.’ It feels good sometimes to be the most rogue person there.”

Infiltration. That may be what Pop’s got popping.

When Homme spoke of a “historic place,” he did not mean Arizona Attorney Magazine, though he could have. Like Detroit’s Fox Theatre, where the two musicians played, AzAt has great bones, sharp looks, and a storied past. But infiltration is not our usual fare.

Except in May. In May we open the doors—main stage and balcony—to creative talents who showcase their art and—more important—the rogue portions of their brains. They rattle the chandeliers and kick over some furniture. Occasionally, a guitar is smashed.

I hope you share my pleasure at the thrill of artists in full concert. Congratulations and thanks to all those who submitted and all those who prevailed in our annual competition. They truly are all winners—brave infiltrators who are conversant with the rogue.

Come on in, find a spot. Reach toward the stage, for the house lights are dimming

Rock on, Iggy.

iggy Pop, "I Wanna Be Your Dog," 1979.

iggy Pop, “I Wanna Be Your Dog,” 1979.

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