June 22, 1944: President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signs the G.I. Bill of Rights, which offers educational assistance to veterans.

June 22, 1944: President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signs the G.I. Bill of Rights, which offers educational assistance to veterans.

It was just two weeks ago that I noted the ribbon-cutting for a memorial to the talented Ernest McFarland.

But wait. There’s more.

Tomorrow, Saturday, Feb. 28, a new exhibit titled “Ernest McFarland and the G.I. Bill” opens at the Arizona Capitol Museum (11 am sharp).

Here is the news as transmitted from the state:

“Since 1944, more than 19 million service members nationwide have benefit=ted from Senator McFarland’s legislation,” said Secretary of State Michele Reagan. “A veteran of World War I, it was important to McFarland to assist veterans transitioning back into civilian life.”

Ernest McFarland

Ernest McFarland

Ernest McFarland, or “Mac” as he liked to be called, served Arizona as a U.S. Senator (1941-1953), Governor (1955-1959) and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (1965-1971). His impact on Arizona is still being felt today; whether it was fighting for water rights, his tireless work on the G.I. Bill of Rights or the impressive amount of opinions he wrote as an Arizona Supreme Court Justice; McFarland has left a lasting legacy of change and improvement across Arizona.

The McFarland room is the latest addition to the exhibit Arizona: Defense to Development, which explores the impact World War II had on the state.

Want to go? Here is information about the Museum.

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