Today, I point you to a few photos I snapped of a terrific law school event. But after that, I have a question for you.

The event was a panel discussion at the University of Arizona Law School in recognition of Constitution Day. I told you about the Rehnquist Center program here. (Bios of the speakers can be found here.)

L to R: Speaker Clint Bolick, Goldwater Institute; Professor Toni Massaro; Hon. Neil Wake, U.S. District Court; Seth Waxman, WilmerHale

As always, the Center brought together a stellar group of people to discuss contemporary cases from the U.S. Supreme Court.

More photos are at the Arizona Attorney Facebook page.

Now, my question.

You’ve likely heard by now that UA Law Dean Larry Ponoroff tendered his resignation last week. (He resigned as dean only; he will remain on the faculty.) I always appreciated Dean Ponoroff’s insights, and I’ll be sorry to see him step down from leadership.

By coincidence, I had calendared with him a late October interview. It was to be a Q&A in the tradition we have of law school dean interviews. I was curious about how things are going at the law school, and what ideas and plans he had.

My first thought upon hearing the news was simply to assume our interview would be canceled, and that I’d simply wait to see who was named the new Dean.

But then I spoke with a lawyer whom I respect very much. He urged me to find out if Dean Ponoroff would still want to chat. The lawyer reminded me that someone on the way out (even if not all the way out) may be candid about the lessons he and his school have learned.

Do you agree? Would you find such insights helpful?

Professor Toni Massaro, Sept. 14, 2012

It’s ironic that I had to be reminded of that lesson, given that a similar Q&A has turned out to be almost my favorite dean interview ever. Back in 2009, I interviewed UA Law Dean Toni Massaro as she was ending her long tenure as Dean. Our conversation was rousing and gave me added hope for legal education.

Perhaps another such interview could offer the same result. Please let me know what you think.

It’s always terrific when a great plan comes together.

That’s the first thing that occurred to me when I saw an upcoming CLE announced. It is on next Thursday, October 13 (from 9 am-4 pm), and it’s co-sponsored by the State Bar of Arizona and the Peoria Municipal Court.

The title of the program is “We the People: A Symposium on the U.S. Constitution and the U.S. Supreme Court.” Read more and register here. I plan to be there most of the day.

Rio Vista Recreation Center, Peoria, Ariz.

What appears most appealing is the opportunity to learn a little about both of those institutions that are central to our nation (and who couldn’t use a little of that). But just as important is the chance to hear from some scholars on modern-day cases and controversies. For example, the day’s roster includes immigration debates as enacted through SB1070, federalism and states’-rights questions, and federal review.

These are issues that are as timely as today’s newspaper.

Here is a description of the seminar and the faculty:

An exploration of the U.S. Constitution and the U.S. Supreme Court by legal experts from across the country.

Seminar Chair: Judge G. T. Anagnost, Peoria Municipal Court

Faculty:

Professor Paul Bender, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University

Paul Bender

Dean David Meyer, Tulane University Law School

David Meyer

Professor R. Kent Newmyer, University of Connecticut Law School

R. Kent Newmyer

Professor Jennifer Chacón, University of California Irvine School of Law

Jennifer Chacón

Professor Justin Marceau, University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Justin Marceau

Again, for more on this seminar, the day’s complete agenda and to register, click here.

To add to the day’s pleasures, you may want to bring your running shoes and workout clothes, because the CLE will occur in the Rio Vista Recreation Center in Peoria. I have heard amazing things about this place, and you can read more about it here. If you happen to be a Peoria resident, working out at the Center is free; if you’re not, there’s a small daily fee.

Rio Vista Recreation Center

Whether or not you exercise more than your brain that day, the Center is worth seeing. Here are some more photos.

Finally, the architect was Architekton of Tempe, Ariz. Click here for more about the building, including photos, drawings and concept.

See you in Peoria.

(Here are directions to the Rio Vista Recreation Center, located at 8866 W. Thunderbird, Peoria, AZ: 1/4 mile west of the 101 freeway off of W. Thunderbird Rd. Turn North on Rio Vista Blvd. and end at the Center.)