The Camby Hotel in Phoenix will be the site of what looks to be a valuable lawyer roundtable on Thursday, May 26.

The Camby Hotel in Phoenix will be the site of what looks to be a valuable lawyer roundtable on Thursday, May 26.

We routinely consider the modern challenges that face attorneys and their law practices. But those challenges vary considerably depending on your practice type, firm size, and client base.

That is part of the strategy behind a roundtable discussion this Thursday evening, May 26. Attorney David French, who is also a broad thinker about the legal economy and legal future, will moderate a group of lawyers from diverse practices.

Gathering starting at 5:00 pm at the Camby Hotel in Phoenix, participants range from those in global law firms, to regional (southwest) law firms, to primarily Arizona operations, and even those who have crafted profitable practices as small firms.

RSVP to 602-753-6027 or rsvp@dfrenchadvisors.com.

Those speaking will be:

Here is a flyer with all the information:

roundtable flyer lawyer panel moderated by David French 05-26-16 v2I’ll be there on Thursday evening, and I hope to see you too.

The current issue of San Diego Lawyer asks attorneys how they view differences between the legal generations.

The current issue of San Diego Lawyer asks attorneys how they view differences between the legal generations.

Last week, I was happy to be in San Diego, where I was attending some legal-related meetings. And as you may know, when I travel, I like to see what local legal organizations have on offer in the area of publications.

So that took me to the pages of the San Diego County Bar Association’s San Diego Lawyer. And much to my pleasure, their current issue features a panel discussion related to differences between generations, perceived and real. As the panel of lawyers was asked, Are lawyers from different generations really all that different?

The whole issue opens here. (The Q&A begins on page 7 and jumps to page 24.)

Or you can click into the whole issue below.

 

 

That great feature article reminded me of a Q&A on a related topic we did back in 2008. Our September 2008 roundtable gathered the youngest and oldest Arizona lawyers in a room and asked them to talk about their challenges.

Attorney Tony Jones speaks at our 2008 roundtable that gathered Arizona's youngest and oldest lawyers.

Attorney Tony Jones speaks at our 2008 roundtable that gathered Arizona’s youngest and oldest lawyers.

I haven’t hosted a roundtable in a while. If I did plan one or more in the coming year, what topics would you like to see covered? In the past, I’ve covered, among others, topics like digital courts, solo lawyers, public lawyers, attorneys with disabilities, lawyer advertising, and lawyers in media/news.

The world’s your oyster! Let me know at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Corporate Counsel panel discussion, Snell & Wilmer, Sept. 26, 2012

O in-house corporate counsel, how we yearn to know what’s in your heads.

That desire has long been held by lawyers and law firms. And in a tough economy, the yearning gets raised a few octaves more.

I wrote before about a recent corporate counsel panel discussion in Phoenix. There, we explored a number of topics. Of most interest to the assembled lawyers, though, were questions about how corporate counsel choose to hire—and fire—outside counsel.

An insightful article in the Harvard Business Review came to my attention (thanks to legal strategist Dee Schiavelli). In it, the author says that we’re in the age of the in-house counsel. He argues that they have eclipsed the powerful stature of the outside law firm.

For more evidence that our panel was on the right track, here is an article from the ABA Journal that explores “four reasons why general counsel fire their law firms.”

Intrigued, aren’t you? Let me know if there are reasons that the author fails to mention.

All fired up: Lawyer brain activity