A gift from a previous delegation from Moldova was this beautiful booklet of pictures from the country. Scroll to the bottom to see how you can become the proud owner of it (and to see it open and extended).

A gift from a previous delegation from Moldova was this beautiful booklet of pictures from the country. Scroll to the bottom to see how you can become the proud owner of it (and to see it open and extended).

This spring brought a variety of international delegations to Arizona. These groups of lawyers and judges offer the opportunity to exchange ideas and to learn how justice is rendered around the world.

On April 27, a delegation from Moldova came to the State Bar of Arizona. There, they heard about U.S. and Arizona processes regarding litigation, professional ethics, and lawyer discipline. Here is a photo of Bar Counsel Amy Rehm speaking with the Moldovan delegation.

State Bar of Arizona Bar Counsel Amy Rehm addresses a delegation of Moldovan judges and lawyers, April 27, 2015, Phoenix, Ariz.

State Bar of Arizona Bar Counsel Amy Rehm addresses a delegation of Moldovan judges and lawyers, April 27, 2015, Phoenix, Ariz.

On April 21, the Peoria Municipal Court and Tulane Law School hosted 35 judges from China in a cultural education forum. According to organizers, “The Court hosted a four-person panelist discussion addressing Access to Justice, both on a larger scale and also with a focus on limited jurisdiction courts. The panelists were led by the Hon. Presiding Judge George T. Anagnost and also included Dr. (attorney) Catherine Jiang, Mr. Patrick Scott (AOC / AZ Supreme Court), and Attorney / Judge Pro Tem Debbie Weecks.”

Finally, the Arizona Supreme Court in March met with eight members of Nepal’s judiciary. It was part of an initiative launched by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the government of Nepal. At the Arizona event, Senior Justice Kalyan Shrestha worked with the UNDP’s Rule of Law and Human Rights Program to plan a series of discussions with Arizona’s court professionals.

Arizona Office of the Courts Director David Byers (rear) with the delegates from Nepal, March 2015. Nepal Supreme Court Senior Justice Kalyan Shrestha is in the light-gray three-button suit in front of Mr. Byers.

Arizona Office of the Courts Director David Byers (rear) with the delegates from Nepal, March 2015. Nepal Supreme Court Senior Justice Kalyan Shrestha is in the light-gray three-button suit in front of Mr. Byers.

Here is more news from the Supreme Court on the Nepal visit. Congratulations to all Arizona participants on your local ambassadorship.

“Nepal has a three-tiered court system similar to American courts in which there are trial courts, appellate courts and a Supreme Court.  Subject matter experts and Arizona’s five justices met with the delegates to answer their questions and provide information about Arizona’s progress in key areas. The delegates were particularly interested in how the courts address the needs of the poor and disadvantaged as well as victims of crime.”

“‘Senior Supreme Court Justice Shrestha and the UN representative selected Arizona because Nepal faces some of the same issues we are working to address successfully,’ said Chief Justice Scott Bales. ‘We noted the importance of seeking input and support from the community broadly, including leaders from outside the judicial branch. Some of our best innovations have come by including non-judicial members from the public, private, and non-profit sectors in various court initiatives.’”

“Justice Shrestha and seven colleagues from the Nepal judiciary spent a day and a half last week meeting with state court subject matter specialists before also visiting the Sandra Day O’Connor Federal Courthouse and the Superior Court in Maricopa County. Later in the week, the delegates met with Nepalese students from Arizona State University and representatives from ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. They departed on March 5 for stops in Washington, DC and New York City before returning to Kathmandu, Nepal.”

“The representatives from Nepal included:

  • Senior Justice Kalyan Shrestha, Supreme Court
  • Honorable Judge Mr. Til Prasad Shrestha, Appellate Court, Hetauda
  • Honorable Judge Mr. Hemraj Pant, Appellate Court, Patan
  • Honorable Judge Mr. Radha Krishna Upreti, District Court, Rautahat
  • Mr. Lal Bahadur Kunwar, Joint Registrar, Supreme Court
  • Mr. Bhadrakali Pokharel, Bench Officer, Supreme  Court
  • Mr. Ratna Kaji Shrestha, Justice Sector Coordinator for the on Rule of Law and Human Rights Program, United Nations Development Program
  • Mr. D. Christopher Decker, Chief Technical Advisor on Rule of Law and Human Rights Program, United Nations Development Program”

Back to that Moldova booklet. Here it is extended:

Moldova postcards extended

The postcard booklet extended: That’s a lot of feet of a beautiful country.

To claim it as your own, just write to me with a few paragraphs about your (a) visit to Moldova or (b) your desire to travel there. Fair warning: Your submission may be used as a guest blog post! I’m at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

A clean desk: Is that what we aspire to? Really?

No, this desk is NOT the winner of a prize for revealing workspaces.

And the winner is …

Wait wait wait! Taking a tip from the Academy Awards, I have to stretch this out for a bit.

Back in January, I offered a prize—a book of legal poetry—to a reader who shared a photo of their desk, messy or not. A description was invited but not required.

You may recall that my desk-psychosis grew deep as my own workspace got lost under piles. And I started to wonder what a clean or dirty desk says about each of us. Like my paper piles, that musing got pretty deep; read it here.)

I am happy to report that my messiness concerns resonated with readers. I heard from a number of folks who reported the state of their workspaces’ messiness levels.

As promised, I randomly selected a winner, and she is … K Royal. Congratulations, K!

K Royal's desk photo won her a book of poetry (though storage bins might have been a better prize!).

K Royal’s desk photo won her a book of poetry (though storage bins might have been a better prize!).

And here is K’s description of her space:

“Your note about a messy desk made me laugh out loud, so although not noteworthy, here is mine. Yes … double monitors, family photos … including my dog, shoe tape dispenser, diamond post it note holder, Dutch slippers, m&m coffee mug, and although you may not be able to see them … shoe phone holders for two cell phones and a Hedwig mug to hold pens.”

She ends with a cheery but noncommittal “May your organization remain exactly what you need it to be!”

By coincidence (yes, it’s a coincidence), I’ve known K from when she was at ASU Law School. She’s gone on to other things (including a stint in Texas), and she’s now Privacy Counsel at Align Technology in San Jose, California.

Privacy Counsel? Hmm, am I allowed to mention that?

In any case, I hope K enjoys “Poetic Justice” as much as I did.

K, send me a note at arizona.attorney@azbar.org with your snail-mail address and I’ll get this posted tout de suite.

K Royal's desk photo won her this book of poetry!

K Royal’s desk photo won her this book of poetry!

A clean desk: Is that what we aspire to? Really?

A clean desk: Is that what we aspire to? Really?

Happy National Clean Off Your Desk Day.

OK, I admit that may be one of the least-elegant national days of recognition possible (right up there with National Talk Like a Pirate Day). But it is a day that spurs us to action.

I’ve gone on a lot about clean desks here and here, so notice that there is a national day in its honor came as quite a surprise. Never heard of it? Well, it’s out there on the internets, so it must be true. Read more about it here.

The day came to my attention via a communication by fellow State Bar of Arizona staffer Heather King. She alerted me and all staff to the tidy event, when she invited desk photos for an employee competition. (Heather was also kind enough to point to my own blog post as she urged involvement.)

A photo of your desk could win you this book of poetry!

A photo of your desk could win you this book of poetry!

On this special day, I point you to a separate competition, one I wrote about in my January editor’s column for Arizona Attorney.

As I say in my column, I invite you to send a photo of your own work space, and you may include a caption describing why your own desk is a welcome work home for you (or why not, I suppose).

You can read the whole column here.

One person selected by me in a nonscientific method will be rewarded with a book of legal poetry, called Poetic Justice, which I reviewed here. It makes excellent reading and/or re-gifting—your choice!

Send your photo to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org. And yes, I may publish the photos I get, so be ready for that!

So, you’re familiar with bingo, right? That quaint game with the squares, the marker and the chance to win a buck or two?

This year, the Convention exhibitors have put bingo on steroids. (I couldn’t use that exclamation in years past, when the Diamondbacks were an exhibitor.)

Convention attendees are given a card on which the exhibitors’ names are inscribed in a bingo grid. Wander about, stop by the exhibitor booths, ask them to stamp your card. Pretty soon, you’re on your way to the chance to win—more than a couple of bucks.

At my last count, I saw that there were 22 prizes available. And those prizes (again by my count) have a combined value of about $3,100.

Boom! I think I just got real interested in that ol’ game of bingo!

And it bears mentioning: When you get your card stamped, stay and chat with the exhibitors for a few minutes. I urge that for a few reasons: 

  • You weren’t born in a barn, were you? Be polite; your seminar can wait a minute.
  • The products and services they tout are often remarkable and may well be just what your law office is looking for.
  • The payments by exhibitors go a long way toward underwriting the costs of this annual event. So every time you see an exhibitor, remember that their presence helps keep Convention costs reasonable.

So that’s my message. Go. Meet. Get stamped. And good luck!