Former Senator Mark Udall will deliver a lecture at the UA Law School on March 10, 2015.

Former Senator Mark Udall will deliver a lecture at the UA Law School on March 10, 2015.

“It’s 2015: Why Are We Still Debating Torture?” is the provocative and timely title for former Sen. Mark Udall’s 2015 Marks Lecture, which he will deliver at the James E. Rogers College of Law in Tucson on Tuesday, March 10.

The event is free and open to the public, but you must register here.

Background provided by the law school illustrates why the ex-lawmaker is a good fit for this topic:

“Senator Udall, who served on the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, led the bipartisan effort to rein in the NSA’s dragnet collection of Americans’ personal data. He also has been an unwavering advocate for strong, independent oversight of the CIA. He was one of the leading advocates for releasing the Senate Intelligence Committee’s study of the CIA’s detention and interrogation program.”

News stories on the former Senator’s willingness to demand accountability from entrenched and powerful agencies suggest his lecture will be candid and eye-opening. Read about Mark Udall here, here, and here.

The UA Law School information continues:

“Senator Udall is known for reaching across party lines to solve problems and for his willingness to work with people, including those with whom he has philosophical differences. He championed bipartisan legislation to balance the nation’s budget, protect our public lands and establish a strong national security policy. While in the Senate, he served on the Select Committee on Intelligence.”

Arizona UA Law School logoUdall is a Colorado resident, and he represented that state in the U.S. Senate from 2009 through 2014 and in the House from 1999 to 2008. He also served a term in the Colorado State Legislature from 1997 to 1999.

When: Tuesday, March 10, 2015, 5:30-6:30 pm

Where: James E. Rogers College of Law, 1201 E. Speedway Blvd., Room 164 (Ares Auditorium), Tucson, AZ 85721

Here’s a map:

 

Lawyers and history buffs (and many more) should read this month's Wired Magazine coverage of Edward Snowden.

Lawyers and history buffs (and many more) should read this month’s Wired Magazine coverage of Edward Snowden.

I can suggest a few reasons you should read the cover story in this month’s Wired Magazine.

First, you should always read the cover story in Wired Magazine. But you probably want more reason than that.

OK. Second, the legal-lover in you knows you’re aching to gain some insight into Edward Snowden’s role in an ongoing international incident. How does he justify his actions? Will the American people ultimately view him as a villain or as an aid to American transparency?

The U.S. government’s response to that second question is a complicated and not entirely coherent one. It has ranged from throwing around the word “treason” to claiming pleasure at the resulting dialogue about the NSA and the CIA (always, of course, without praising Snowden).

If that legal insight is all you aspire to, the Wired feature story based on exclusive one-on-one conversations with the former intelligence operative should please you very much. You can read the whole story here.

BUT … if you, like me, enjoy gaining insight into how magazines are created, then you really need to read the opening letter by the editor-in-chief too. (Yes, some of us read those too!)

It is only in Scott Dadich’s column that you will learn how Platon’s phenomenal photos came to be. You’ll read about the machinations that led to surreptitious meetings in Russian hotel rooms. And you’ll marvel at how random inexpensive props bought in Manhattan spurred the imagination of Snowden thousands of miles east.

Kudos to the editor, writer James Bamford, director of photography Patrick Witty, and photographer Platon. This is an amazing accomplishment.