The Anxious Lawyer by Jeena Cho Karen Gifford book cover

In the current issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine, a book review explores what attorneys can learn about themselves and their world via meditation.

If you’re unsure about that idea and cotton toward the tried and true, let’s remember that meditation has been around for millennia. So it should be acceptable, even to your firm’s management committee. Just sayin’.

The review author is attorney Juliet Peters, and you can read the entire review here.

And the book co-authors are Jeena Cho and Karen Gifford—lawyers themselves, in case lawyers are the only ones you trust with your self-improvement.

Happily, Jeena will be a panelist on a program I’m co-producing in just a few weeks. Unhappily, the program will be in Miami, not Phoenix. But if you happen to be at the midyear meeting of the National Association of Bar Executives, drop in! Or if you’re in the environs that week for the ABA meeting, drop me a line at arizona.attorney@azbar.org, or tweet to me @azatty. It’d be great to meet and compare mindfulness strategies! (Spoiler alert: You’ve got me beat, and I don’t even know you.)

Here is a link to the conference. And here is a description of the panel, titled “Mindful Lawyer, Mindful Bar,” which also features Jayne Reardon, Executive Director of the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism:

“Mindfulness has become top-of-mind for many people, including your members. Even as work–life balance, meditation, and increased fulfillment and satisfaction have become a more central part of a professional’s goals, those aspirations may seem harder than ever to achieve. Our panelists have learned through law and life experience how challenging incorporating practices such as self-care and mindfulness can be—but they have discovered the many wonderful benefits of these practices, including more joy and satisfaction. They will talk about the importance of mindfulness for the attorney. They also will offer practical tips and next steps to create robust mindfulness programs at your bar.”

See you in Miami … or wherever thoughtful lawyers gather.

georgia-bar-journal-cover-oct-2016I just flew in from Savannah, and boy are my arms—empowered.

A communications conference hosted by ABA-affiliate NABE is what took me to the Garden City. And the sessions—not to mention the city itself—provided eye-opening moments of wonder.

Today, though, I mention not the great conference, but a magazine—specifically the Georgia Bar Journal. On a routine basis, they put out a great journal. But this month, their entire issue is an idea worth stealing: They explored the history of women lawyers in Georgia.

You can see the entire issue here.

Leading off the package of stories is a gem that tells the story of Minnie Hale Daniel, who fought for and won the right to be admitted as Georgia’s first woman lawyer. The article opens:

“A woman lawyer! Help us to keep our girls at the fireside and let our young mothers raise, by the help of God, boys to speak and vote and live the life they would live if He had made them men; and O for a Paul to command our women to keep silence and be keepers of the home,” exclaimed a Georgia state legislator in August 2011, quoting a mother’s letter to him.

Hale eventually won her fight—and her fight on behalf of countless other women—and was licensed to practice law on August 21, 1916. Her achievement has had no noticeable impact on the ability of boys to speak and vote and live.

georgia-bar-journal-minnie-hale-daniel-story_optWisely, the magazine issue is not merely a history piece captured in amber. It includes articles on the engagement and promotion of women lawyers, and the value—and challenges—of mentoring.

If you’re wondering why this is still important and crucial in 2016. Just. Don’t. Even. I mean, even the economic challenges still faced by women attorneys are substantial. And those are merely the most quantifiable slights; things get worse.

I’m helping to produce a panel discussion on gender equity in the legal profession for a national conference in Miami next February, and I’m pleased to have this magazine issue as a resource. And as we look toward 2017 and beyond at Arizona Attorney Magazine, we would do well to follow the lead of our smart friends in Georgia. Well done.

Below is an image of a letter Winnie Hale sent to Georgia lawmakers. You have to love her line, “It is my one ambition to be granted a license in Georgia. I am entitled to such, whether I practice LAW in Georgia or China.” Pioneering spirit, that.

Letter sent to Georgia legislators by Minnie Anderson Hale (later Minnie Hale Daniel): "It is my one ambition to be granted a license in Georgia. I am entitled to such, whether I practice LAW in Georgia or China."

Letter sent to Georgia legislators by Minnie Anderson Hale (later Minnie Hale Daniel): “It is my one ambition to be granted a license in Georgia. I am entitled to such, whether I practice LAW in Georgia or China.”

 

We may not all mean the same thing when we discuss workplace ethics. I'd like to hear your ideas, and stories too.

We may not all mean the same thing when we discuss workplace ethics. I’d like to hear your ideas, and stories too.

What are we talking about when we talk about ethics in the workplace? Like most important topics, it may be more difficult to define than we typically imagine.

At the end of this month, I have the opportunity to present on the topic of the ethical workplace. The audience will be organization leaders at the National Association of Bar Executives annual meeting, so my focus will go beyond “Please don’t steal the Post-Its” (though they shouldn’t). Instead, I’m aiming to discuss the ethical decision-points that leaders face daily—hidden as they may be among the workaday grind.

My presentation is nearly done, but I’d like to include some other examples of noteworthy leader ethics, so I invite you to write me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org. The anecdote may come from your own organization or from one you’ve heard about. And it can be for attribution or entirely anonymous. In fact, feel free to cast your story to me as a hypothetical. That works just fine.

To help you cogitate on this, here is my presentation description:

“Ethical Decision-Making: The Courage to Say No. Leadership requires making decisions that affect people and resources. This session’s speaker prompts us to consider how we make those important decisions, how to sustain an ethical workplace, and how to deal with the many pressures to do all things and be all things for our members and the public.”

Thank you for sharing your ideas and stories; I look forward to connecting with you!

blog

First of all, the second half of that title is highly unlikely. I will speak to my titling minions right away.

But what I’m curious about today is: What can you tell me about your blogging successes?

Or at least about your blogging not-disasters?

Why do I ask? Well, later in March I will be delivering a webinar to attendees across the country on the topic of blogging. It’s titled “Top Tips for Bar Bloggers,” and you can read more about it (and even register!) here.

Screenshot of a teaser for my upcoming blogging webinar (yes, I know, they put too many words on the slide).

Screenshot of a teaser for my upcoming blogging webinar (yes, I know, they put too many words on the slide).

Two little boggles about that title:

  1. I definitely should have added a number. You know, “Tim’s 7 Blogging Tips,” or “11 Blogging Tips That Will Make You More Attractive.” After all, we know from SEO and just, y’know, people that folks respond to numerals, and they like to be told there will be a takeaway they can count on.
  2. The other thing about the title: I’m not sure blogging strategy for bars should be any different than blogging strategy for any other niche. It’s about differentiation, writing, and (relatively) compelling content.

That’s why I’d like your thoughts on blogging:

  • Are you a blogger who has a top tip or two?
  • Do you read blogs that seem to “get it” and that serve your needs well? If so, what single thing do you like about those blogs?

If I steal/use one of your ideas, I promise to give you credit in the nationally delivered webinar (I joke about a lot, but never about giving credit for great ideas).

Deal? Deal.

Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

And here is a screen-shot of the registration page. No reason that you too could not register, right here!

NABE webinar on blogging by Tim Eigo 03-2015-page0001

If you’ve read this far, you deserve a treat. Here is a GIF I am expecting to use in my webinar. It’s about the importance of timing in blogs. But moving cats is always a win.

Blog content is important. But your timing is important too. Because cats.

Blog content is important. But your timing is important too. Because cats.

Texas School Book Depository

Dallas building housing the former Texas School Book Depository

First things first. I am in Dallas this week, for the first time ever: Any tips?

A friend from Alabama also will be in the city known to “Live Large. Think Big” (whatever that means), and he made a pretty good suggestion: We should visit the Texas School Book Depository. For some people, that may not ring any bells, but it is the structure in which Lee Harvey Oswald crouched as he fired fatal shots at President John F. Kennedy back in 1963.

The building is still on Dealey Plaza, and the sixth and seventh floors have been converted into a museum commemorating the awful day. Read more about it here.

Yeah, we may be downers. But what history-lover is not?

NABE logoBut because I may find myself with any additional free time, I would appreciate some tourist insight from folks who know this town. Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

On the focused-on-the-conference-front, I will be enjoying quite a bit of learning at the hands of presenters at the NABE midyear conference. And I’m happy to add that I will be one of those presenters. (Thanks again to those who offered suggestions for our panel on social media!)

Jordan Furlong

Jordan Furlong

On Wednesday, just before we present, we’ll have the opportunity to hear from Jordan Furlong. (Follow him on Twitter here.)

Furlong, a Canadian lawyer, is one of a handful of people focused with clear eyes on the future of the legal profession.

I have mentioned Furlong more than once in my blog, but for a real education, head over to his own page. There, you can read his insights on, most recently, legal education. (See posts here and here.)

That’s it for now. I eagerly await your Dallas suggestions!

social media icons

Next February, I’ll be part of a panel communicating all we know for a “Social Media Master Class.” At the moment, I’m feeling vaguely outclassed.

Sure, by February, I plan to have a vast knowledge to impart. But right now, I’d appreciate your insight on what you would expect if you passed by a hotel conference room and spotted the following sign:

“Social Media Advanced Class”

That, essentially, is what we’ll cover in our session.

We will be presenting at the ABA/NABE Midyear Meeting in Dallas, and our audience will be chock full of bar association executives and lawyers.

I didn’t write the copy for the program description, but I am looking for ways to meet its expectations. Here’s what it says:

“If you have not seen the very latest features for Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and other leading social media platforms, you may be living under a rock. Delve into the newest add-ons and enhancements that will bolster your messaging workflow while optimizing your Association’s exposure. Learn how to navigate unexpected (and sometimes unwelcome) redesigns of leading sites. Plus, get recommendations on the best shortcut tools like HootSuite to ease the pains of posting. Whether you’re a seasoned social media junkie or the new kid on the block, you’ll find something valuable to take away.”

social media "map" by Fred Cavazza

I love this social media “map” by Fred Cavazza.

Hmmm. We’d better bring our A game.

I figure one of the best ways to stretch your audience’s knowledge is to stretch your own. That’s why I’ve reached into a few new worlds this past month, to Quora and even Instagram. And I’ve also been examining the old standards (Facebook and Twitter) for what I think are best practices. But Pinterest hasn’t yet sucked me into its vortex.

Later today, I meet (via conference call) will the other panelists (from Ohio, San Francisco, Philadelphia and the District of Columbia). We’ll be strategizing the best way to communicate valuable content to attendees.

Your insights would be appreciated. Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver

Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver

Earlier this week, I shared the magazine’s good news about our national award (press release here). But today is Change of Venue Friday, so we’re on a related but lighter topic: Here are some photos from my trip to Denver (nothing says Change of Venue better than few words, more pics).

I’ve placed a few photos in this blog post; the rest are here, on the Arizona Attorney Facebook page.

But before you head over yonder, you really have to watch a brief video. No, not by me, but by a friend and talented communicator named Patrick Tandy. He’s the Communications Director at the Maryland State Bar Association. Besides all the work that goes into attending a conference (it’s true), Patrick also lugged his iPad around, snapping pictures and capturing the flavor of Denver (and the funky Curtis Hotel).

Patrick teamed up with everyone’s favorite songwriting buddy, Warren Zevon, who provided the appropriate track: “Things To Do in Denver When You’re Dead” (communicators – so so dark).

Enjoy his video, and then go look at my non-videofied photos. Have a great weekend.

By the way, have you Liked the Maryland State Bar on Facebook yet? Whatcha waiting for?

Larimer Street, Denver

Larimer Street, Denver