Martin Cooper, chairman and CEO of ArrayComm, holds a Motorola DynaTAC, a 1973 prototype of the first handheld cellular telephone, on April 2, 2003, in San Francisco. The device is 10 inches long and weighs 2.5 pounds.

Call me! Martin Cooper, chairman and CEO of ArrayComm, holds a Motorola DynaTAC, a 1973 prototype of the first handheld cellular telephone, on April 2, 2003, in San Francisco. The device is 10 inches long and weighs 2.5 pounds.

Did you sense it? Lawyers, could you feel the significance of this week in history?

If not, it may because you were busy using your Smartphone and so completely missed a remarkable anniversary: Mobile phones have been around for 40 years.

Granted, the devices you may have hefted four decades ago may not bear any resemblance to the iPhone you pocket today, but the birthday is still real.

Here is how newspapers described the anniversary: “This week in 1973, using a prototype Motorola DynaTac, inventor Martin Cooper made the first call on a mobile phone. Forty years later, it’s considered a brick compared with the diminutive devices we carry around.”

Brick is right.

Click through for more photos of mobile phones throughout history, including some with the utterly charming Cooper bearing his cutting-edge technology.

More news on the topic, and smile-inducing clips from movies and TV, are here. Have a great, phone-filled weekend.

cell phone nomophobiaNomophobia sounds vaguely like a condition afflicting a neighbor I’d like to see move away. But it’s really nothing more than “the fear of being without mobile phone contact.”

If the end of that sentence made your skin crawl, you may want to listen to that cry for help and read this terrific blog post out of the Washington State Bar Association site.

Titled “My Cell Phone Is Ruining My Life,” the post explores all the telltale signs of a disease that affects countless millions. In fact, as I perused the list, I must admit I spotted myself in a few places

  • Keeping your phone constantly within reach during both sleeping and waking hours
  • Checking your phone in the middle of the night
  • Taking your phone with you everywhere you go, including inappropriate places like the restroom
  • Obsessively checking battery life
  • Checking your phone every few minutes, even when interacting with other people
  • Feeling anxious when separated from your mobile device
  • Constantly checking your pocket or purse to ensure your phone is thereno-mobile-phone-circle

Sorry. While you were reading that list, I checked my phone twice. But on this Change of Venue Friday, I suggest you do as I say, not as I do. Read the complete article, without checking your phone once!

Together, we can beat nomophobia (or at least learn to say it without chuckling).

Have a great weekend.