Ernesto Miranda

Ernesto Miranda

Next week, we have two opportunities to her smart folks talk about a landmark Supreme Court case that arose in Arizona. The case, of course, is Miranda v. Arizona, whose 50 anniversary is this year:

“In 1966, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction of Ernesto Miranda on kidnapping and rape charges because he was not informed of his rights during his arrest, making his written and signed confession null and void. After the U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Miranda was retried by the state of Arizona and his confession was not used as evidence. Miranda was convicted and sentenced to 20-30 years in prison.”

The first event, on Monday, May 2, includes speakers and historic artifacts, and is hosted by the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records.

  • The Arizona Capitol Museum is celebrating Law Day 2016 with “Miranda: More than Words,” May 2, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the Historic Supreme Courtroom, 1700 W. Washington St., Phoenix. Admission is free.
  • The lineup of speakers includes the arresting officer in the case, and organizers have partnered with the Phoenix Police Museum for an exhibit on the case.
  • A day-long speaker series in the State Library of Arizona Marguerite B. Cooley Reading Room, one floor above the Historic Supreme Courtroom will include speakers Arizona Court of Appeals Judge Maurice Portley; attorney Bob McWhirter; and retired Capt. Carroll Cooley, Phoenix Police Department arresting officer in the Miranda case.
  • For more information, go here or contact the State Library of Arizona at 602-926-3870.

Miranda Arizona Law-Day-2016_Flyer_opt

The second event, on Wednesday, May 4, features a panel discussion, hosted by the Maricopa County Bar Association:

 

Judges of CLEO Hall of Fame logoCongratulations to three esteemed Arizona legal leaders, each recognized for their outstanding work as judges.

Judges Maurice Portley (Ariz. Court of Appeals), Carol Scott Berry (Phoenix Municipal Court), and Margarita Bernal (formerly of the Tucson Municipal Court) have been named to the “Judges of CLEO” Hall of Fame by the Council on Legal Education Opportunity.

All of the honorees are online here.

Here is more information from CLEO, and well done to Arizona’s judges.

“For more than 45 years, the Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) has worked to make the law a more diverse profession by expanding opportunities for underrepresented persons to pursue a legal career.”

“This virtual ‘Judges of CLEO’ Hall of Fame recognizes the outstanding careers and accomplishments of some of our CLEO alumni who have made it to the highest levels of the profession, and are some of the nation’s most distinguished current and former members of the judiciary.”

Arizona Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch uspeaks to the need for more special advocates for children, April 3, 2013. (Mary K. Reinhart/Arizona Republic)

Arizona Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch speaks to the need for more special advocates for children, April 3, 2013. (Mary K. Reinhart/Arizona Republic)

Just a short note this Monday morning to remind all that April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. To honor the justice system’s commitment to some of our most vulnerable, Chief Justice Berch held a press conference on the steps of the Arizona Supreme Court.

The April 3 event shone a spotlight on the state’s CASA program: Court Appointed Special Advocates. As the organization describes itself:

“CASA stands for Court Appointed Special Advocates. CASA volunteers are everyday people appointed by a judge to speak up for abused and neglected children in court. In Arizona, there are 15 county CASA programs administered by the CASA of Arizona office which is a program of the Dependent Children’s Services Division of the Arizona Supreme Court Administrative Office of the Courts. CASA of Arizona and its volunteers have been advocating for abused and neglected children in Arizona for over 25 years.”

As the Chief Justice reiterated CASA’s call for help: “Don’t wait. Advocate.”

You should more about the organization—and sign up to help—at their website.

Arizona Court of Appeals Judge Maurice Portley speaks at press conference, Phoenix, Ariz., April 3, 2013 (Mary K. Reinhart/Arizona Republic)

Arizona Court of Appeals Judge Maurice Portley speaks at press conference, Phoenix, Ariz., April 3, 2013 (Mary K. Reinhart/Arizona Republic)

You also should read the Arizona Republic article by Mary K. Reinhart on the presser and the need for more advocates.

Here is the opening of Mary’s article:

“Arizona has never had enough volunteers to work with children in foster care, and judges this week made an appeal for more court-appointed special advocates.”

“The volunteers, or CASAs, act as advisers to juvenile-court judges who oversee the cases of children removed from their homes because of suspected abuse or neglect. Each volunteer is paired with a foster child, and often becomes the one, consistent adult during a child’s time in care. They represent the child in court and make recommendations to judges about their best interests.”

“There are about 850 CASAs for more than 14,300 foster children.”