Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations PCFR logo sealAn event that takes a global view occurs this Thursday evening, and Arizona lawyers (and others!) are invited.

“Sinking or Swimming Together? United States and Europe in the 21st Century” is the title of the event that includes a distinguished judge from Arizona—and from the Hague.

The host is the Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations, and they have announced what they call a landmark event: An Evening with International Criminal Court Judge Ambassador Marc Perrin de Brichambaut and former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Ruth McGregor.

Former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Ruth McGregor

Former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Ruth McGregor

“This special dinner meeting will bring together these two legal powerhouses to discuss U.S., European, and international law issues.”

WHEN: Thursday, Feb. 25, 6:00-8:30 p.m.

WHERE: Gainey Ranch Golf Club, 7600 E Gainey Club Drive, Scottsdale, Ariz.

SCHEDULE: Cocktails 6:00 p.m., dinner 6:45 p.m., program 7:30 p.m.

More information about the evening and ticket information are here.

And here are a few of the topics the speakers may address:

  • Cooperation between the U.S. and Europe has achieved outstanding results in the last half century and will continue to be critical in the next 50 years.
  • The rule of law makes globalization work and supports human rights everywhere, and U.S.–European cooperation is essential to its continued progress.
  • The critical role U.S., European, and international law play in supporting or straining the U.S. –European relationship.
International Criminal Court Judge Ambassador Marc Perrin de Brichambaut

International Criminal Court Judge Ambassador Marc Perrin de Brichambaut

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Professor Saira Mohamed, UC Berkeley School of Law

Professor Saira Mohamed, UC Berkeley School of Law

Later this week, two dialogues are slated at ASU Law School that speak to global concerns about the limits and obligations of humanitarian law.

On Friday, Feb. 14, a UC Berkeley law professor discusses “Syria and the Future of Humanitarian Intervention.” Here’s a description:

“For supporters of humanitarian intervention and its younger cousin, the responsibility to protect, the years of violence in Syria have been a source of frustration and despair. In this presentation, Saira Mohamed, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley School of Law, explores what can be learned from the international community’s anemic response and whether there is any future for the notion that the international community has a duty to intervene to protect human rights.”

More detail is here.

That is followed on Saturday, Feb. 15, with the school’s third annual international humanitarian law workshop, which “features lectures and hands-on exercises.”

If any readers plan to attend either or both event and would like to write a follow-up blog post, contact me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Syria humanitarian law ASU lecture

The Risk game, an edu-taining endeavor

Risk, an edu-taining endeavor

In my way-back time-machine, I have to thank a board game for raising my geography quotient at least a little.

It was in marathon games of Risk at the dining room table that I (and the rest of my family, I’m sure) learned much about the world’s nation-states. Sure, there was as much disinformation as there was information in the game, but I do recall my 9-year-old reaction to coming across places like Mongolia, Yakutsk and Kamchatka. “Cool” only begins to describe it.

After that, the countries of northern Asia larger slipped under my radar. But then this year, I’m seeing Mongolia more and more.

Ian Neale

Ian Neale

For instance, Arizona lawyer Ian Neale spoke with me about a variety of nations, including Mongolia. Neale participates in a global program that places experienced lawyers in law schools around the world. One of his posts was Mongolia, which appears to be a place ripe with opportunity.

You can read our April 2012 story about Neale here (and some of his photos are in the slideshow at the bottom).

And then this week, the law school at the University of Arizona announced a new dual-degree program that involves Mongolia:

“The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law in Tucson, Arizona and the National University of Mongolia School of Law in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, have created a dual-degree partnership, recently formalized in a memorandum of understanding signed by the two schools.”

“The agreement allows students from the National University of Mongolia School of Law (NUM) to earn both a Mongolian law degree and a J.D. from Arizona Law in two years less than it would take to earn those degrees separately.”

The press release goes on to say that two students from Mongolia are already attending the UA Law School, courtesy of a scholarship from law firm Mahoney Liotta LLC.

University of Arizona Law School logo(Read the complete release here.)

I have to tip my hat to the law school and to Ian Neale. I mean, the game of Risk is great and all, but a decidedly less warlike stance to nations is even more welcome.

What other international locales do you think will be sites of legal opportunity in the next decade?

This evening, Perkins Coie partner Howard Cabot will describe his work on the global stage.

As Daniel Rothenberg, Executive Director for the school’s Center for Law and Global Affairs, describes it, Cabot, a well-known local lawyer and adjunct at the College of Law, will discuss his commitment to taking 3-4 month sabbaticals as an integral part of being a partner at a major law firm. The sabbatical system he supports is practiced by a handful of firms and requires that partners spend the time away from the firm doing something substantive and engaging.

Cabot recently returned from a trip to Argentina, Bosnia, Croatia, Israel and South Africa, where he spoke about his experiences defending a Guantanamo Bay detainee while learning how local advocates used the law and courts to face authoritarian repression, conflict and apartheid.

The goal of this event is to open up a conversation about the nature of a career in corporate law while providing a personal case of the value of linking domestic legal practice with a comparison of how others around the world face questions of human rights and the rule of law.

Dean Douglas Sylvester will introduce Cabot, and Rothenberg will manage the interview portion, which will be followed by questions.

More detail is here.

I hope to see you there.