Citrix Sharefile logo

Citrix ShareFile wondered how lawyers use the cloud. So they looked into it.

I occasionally share information and tools from member-service providers. Today, let’s think about … the cloud.

Citrix ShareFile was curious about how many lawyers are using the cloud for their work. And being helpful people, they provided their findings in an easy-to-digest infographic.

Being helpful myself, I’ve parsed it out for you down below.

Please note that Citrix understands lawyers and their needs. How do we know that? Well, they’ve even got footnotes—7 of them—in their infographic. How lawyer-friendly is that?

And as long as we’re on the subject, I urge you to read Bob Ambrogi’s insightful article here. It discusses the fact that many lawyers still say they are hesitant to operate their law practice in the cloud. But one of the unique findings is that lawyers may already be operating there and don’t even know it.

As Bob reports:

Lawyers remain conflicted (surprise!) over using the cloud for legal work.

Lawyers remain conflicted (surprise!) over using the cloud for legal work.

“Every year, the American Bar Association’s Legal Technology Resource Center publishes the Legal Technology Survey Report, a survey of the legal profession’s use of technology. The 2016 survey is now out, and it contains some surprising findings about lawyers and the cloud. (The full survey costs $1,995 and separate volumes cost $350 each.)”

“According to the survey, only 38 percent of lawyers say they have ever used cloud-based software for law-related tasks. That percentage is only a slight budge from the prior three years, during which the percentage hovered around 31 percent. Fifty-three percent say they have never used cloud-based software, and 10 percent have no idea whether they have or not.”

That’s right: 10 percent do not know if they have used the cloud.

Maybe we need to understand what the cloud is before we go dissing it, eh?

Before I forget, here is the great resource Bob Ambrogi named, the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center.

And, finally, here is what Citrix can tell us about our complicated relationship with the cloud. (As always, click to biggify.)

Gavel Gap report cover-page0001This past month, the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy released a report that examines diversity among state court judges. Their analysis from all 50 states and the District of Columbia revealed what the ACS is calling “the gavel gap.”

As described by the ACS:

“For most people, state courts are the ‘law’ for all effective purposes. But we know surprisingly little about state court judges, despite their central and powerful role. Unlike their counterparts on the federal courts, much of the relevant information is non-public, and in many states, not even collected in a systematic way. This lack of information is especially significant because judges’ backgrounds have important implications for the work of courts and the degree to which the public has confidence in their decisions.”

“In order to address this serious shortcoming in our understanding of America’s courts, we have constructed an unprecedented database of state judicial biographies. This dataset—the State Bench Database—includes more than 10,000 current sitting judges on state courts of general jurisdiction in all 50 states. We use it to examine the gender, racial, and ethnic composition of state courts, which we then compare to that of the general population in each state. We find that courts are not representative of the people whom they serve. We call this disparity The Gavel Gap.”

The primary report authors are Tracey E. George, Professor of Law and Political Science at Vanderbilt University, and Albert H. Yoon, Professor of Law and Economics at the University of Toronto.

As they conclude, “We find that state courts do not look like the communities they serve, which has ramifications for the functioning of our judicial system and the rule of law. Our findings are particularly important given the vital role state courts play in our democracy, in our economy, and in our daily lives.”

The complete report is available here and is only 28 pages. Thankfully, it’s also written clearly and accessibly. If you’d like a deeper dive, the ACS also permits anyone to download the underlying data to examine things for yourself.

Take a look. I’d enjoy hearing what you think of the gap in Arizona, or nationwide. And here are a few of the report’s findings.

Gavel Gap infographic 1-page0001

Gavel Gap report infographic 1

Gavel Gap report infographic 3Gavel Gap infographic 2-page0001

Gavel Gap report infographic 2

survey-says

If ever you wonder about the future of the legal profession, this is the season to answer those questions. For it is in the early part of the year when prognosticators offer their view of the legal economy and the practice area outlook.

Today, I point you to Robert Half and Associates, which surveyed lawyers nationwide on their hiring predictions.

The short takeaway is that 26 percent of lawyers surveyed said they’d be expanding or adding new positions in the coming year. Of course, that means 74 percent said they would not be doing that, so I’m not sure how positive a message that is.

I will post more from RHA below, but I wonder what your own predictions are. In November, we published some of the results from a State Bar of Arizona member survey. There, many of you indicated a mildly positive outlook for the future—though it was certainly not a rave review.

You can read more about that survey here. Does it reflect your own views?

rh_classic_monogram Robert Half Legal logoAnd here again is Robert Half:

“The legal field should see additional hiring in the first half of 2015, new research indicates. Twenty-six percent of lawyers interviewed by Robert Half Legal said their law firm or company plans to expand or add new positions in the first six months of this year. Sixty percent of lawyers said they expect to only fill vacant posts, while 7 percent said they will neither fill vacant positions nor create new ones. Just 1 percent of survey respondents anticipate staff reductions.”

(If you like to see factoids reported via infographic, the company provides a good one here.)

Podcast? Why, sure. Go here.

As the company goes on to report:

Lawyers were asked, “Which one of the following practice areas, in your opinion, will offer the greatest number of job opportunities in the first half of 2015?” Their responses:*

Litigation 36%
General business/commercial law 14%
Real estate 9%
Regulatory or compliance 6%
Family law 6%
Labor and employment 3%
Healthcare 3%
Privacy, data security and information law 2%
Tax law 2%
Other 11%
None/don’t know/no answer 9%
101%

*Total percentage does not equal 100 due to rounding.

Lawyers who cited “litigation” as a response also were asked, “Which of the following areas of litigation, if any, will offer the greatest job opportunities in the first half of 2015?” Their responses:**

Insurance defense 45%
Commercial litigation 23%
Employment 17%
Medical malpractice 8%
Personal injury 7%
Intellectual property 6%
Class actions 3%
Other 10%
Don’t know 5%

**Multiple responses were permitted.

infographic - How seaworthy is the information that drives your law firm?

How seaworthy is the information that drives your law firm?

What could be easier—especially on the Friday before a holiday week—than to enjoy a little infographic regarding law practice?

OK, I probably had you until “ … regarding law practice,” but it’s still light lifting for Change of Venue Friday.

The visual art comes our way from U.K. firm InsightBee, which examines the information sources available to law firms. What they have discovered, alas, is that many of those firms and attorneys say that they lack vital information that would better guide their practice decisions.

At the top of this post is just a piece of the graphic. You can see the whole infographic here.

An InsightBee staffer (worker bee?) tells me that 86 percent of U.K. law firms report that they worry they are out of touch with their clients’ needs. And only four percent of law firm partners strongly believe they have the right tools to achieve their business development priorities.

Yes, I know it’s the U.K., not the U.S., but those are still compelling numbers.

In your firm, do you feel you have up-to-date information on what your clients’ needs are? And do you have processes in place to determine those (shifting) needs?

Well, now that I’ve annoyed you with unanswerable questions, I wish you a wonderful—and client-free—weekend!

Knight Fdn First Amendment bullhorn cropped

This week, let’s hear what people are thinking. In the next three days’ posts, I’ll share data from recent surveys.

The first comes to us from the Knight Foundation, which sponsored a survey of young people on their views regarding the First Amendment. Happily, they are generally supportive of the basic right (thank goodness for small wonders). In fact, they may be more supportive of it than are adults.

That is actually a reversal of views that have been expressed over the past decade. The Knight folks optimistically indicate that “increased digital news consumption and classroom teaching are driving the change.” The national study of 10,463 high school students and 588 teachers was released last month, on Constitution Day.

The Knight folks continue:

“[The survey] found only 24 percent of students said that the First Amendment goes too far in guaranteeing the rights of religion, speech, press assembly and petition. In comparison, a Newseum Institute survey that tracks adult opinions on the first amendment showed that 38 percent of adults feel this way. This marks a shift: 10 years ago students (35 percent) were more likely than adults (30 percent) to say that the First Amendment goes too far.”

The report also provides great insight into impressions of privacy and surveillance.

Below is an infographic based on the report. And the whole report is available for downloading here.

Knight Fdn First Amendment infographic