Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations PCFR logo sealAn event that takes a global view occurs this Thursday evening, and Arizona lawyers (and others!) are invited.

“Sinking or Swimming Together? United States and Europe in the 21st Century” is the title of the event that includes a distinguished judge from Arizona—and from the Hague.

The host is the Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations, and they have announced what they call a landmark event: An Evening with International Criminal Court Judge Ambassador Marc Perrin de Brichambaut and former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Ruth McGregor.

Former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Ruth McGregor

Former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Ruth McGregor

“This special dinner meeting will bring together these two legal powerhouses to discuss U.S., European, and international law issues.”

WHEN: Thursday, Feb. 25, 6:00-8:30 p.m.

WHERE: Gainey Ranch Golf Club, 7600 E Gainey Club Drive, Scottsdale, Ariz.

SCHEDULE: Cocktails 6:00 p.m., dinner 6:45 p.m., program 7:30 p.m.

More information about the evening and ticket information are here.

And here are a few of the topics the speakers may address:

  • Cooperation between the U.S. and Europe has achieved outstanding results in the last half century and will continue to be critical in the next 50 years.
  • The rule of law makes globalization work and supports human rights everywhere, and U.S.–European cooperation is essential to its continued progress.
  • The critical role U.S., European, and international law play in supporting or straining the U.S. –European relationship.
International Criminal Court Judge Ambassador Marc Perrin de Brichambaut

International Criminal Court Judge Ambassador Marc Perrin de Brichambaut

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No, Vladimir Putin did not pick his own tie. Why do you ask? rainbow tie

No, Vladimir Putin did not pick his own tie. Why do you ask?

Yesterday was the start of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. By all accounts, the 22nd Olympiad of the cold variety is off to a rocky start, with facilities and venues far from prepared to serve the arriving throngs.

Of course, this is a legal industry blog, not a hospitality industry one, so let’s recall that the biggest controversy of these Olympics is not about hotels but about discrimination, namely the treatment of gay people. Despite some tepid assurances, Russian authorities including Vladimir Putin seem bent on ensuring that only straight people are made to feel welcome at the Games.

And it’s not just about a welcoming sentiment, of course. There is actually an anti-gay law that many are protesting.

Meanwhile, over at Google on Thursday, we spotted an intriguing bit of political speech. The speech was evident in the “Google Doodle,” which changes daily to reflect items of historic or newsworthy importance.

Yesterday, the Google name was superimposed over a variety of athlete illustrations, each residing in a bar of color, all totaling the rainbow hues typically associated with gay rights. (As I post this, the Doodle is still there; go take a look.)

Google home page, Feb. 6, 2014 (and yes, the search commentary is mine).

Google home page, Feb. 6, 2014 (and yes, the search commentary is mine).

In case you were still missing the point, clicking the Doodle took you to the Olympic Charter, specifically the portion opposing discrimination of any kind.

Google is famous for wanting a clean white canvas of a home page, largely uncluttered by any extra words or images. But on Thursday, they also pasted in the Charter’s words for all to see.

Oddly enough, that meant if you were searching for a clear statement about human rights, you wouldn’t find it from Sochi, or even from the occasionally vacillating International Olympic Committee. You would go, instead, to a search page. Makes sense.

Have a great—and discrimination-free—weekend.