The Watergate burglars: Barker, McCord, Sturgis, Martinez, and Gonzalez. Photograph of McCord by Wally McNamee/Corbis; Others courtesy of Bettmann/Corbis/AP Images.

The Watergate burglars: Barker, McCord, Sturgis, Martinez, and Gonzalez. Photograph of McCord by Wally McNamee/Corbis; Others courtesy of Bettmann/Corbis/AP Images.

Last week, I wrote about an anniversary of the Watergate break-in. But then it I began to wonder about those Watergate burglars and their sense of humor. After all, they picked June 17, 1972, for their felonies.

In case you missed it, that’s the same date as the auspicious arrival of the Statue of Liberty into New York Harbor. Below is a painting of the French steamer Isère, laden with the Statue of Liberty, reaching the New York port safely on June 17, 1885. More photos of the French gift are here.

The Statue of Liberty Arrives in New York Harbor, Reception of the Isère, June 20, 1885

The Statue of Liberty Arrives in New York Harbor, Reception of the Isère, June 20, 1885

Regular cut-ups, those crooks were. How perfect the irony if they selected a day that commemorated liberty for their own nefarious actions, which undermined American values.

Meantime, here’s a great story about how those Watergate burglars got caught. True? Not? I leave you to your own judgments.

And from head to foot, here are some great photos of the Statue of Liberty before it was assembled into a whole. Click to enlarge them.

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A nose for news could be turned to other pursuits wine

A nose for news could be turned to other pursuits. True?

Writing a daily blog yields many advantages. You’re forced to read widely, listen intently, and converse often with readers near and far. And sometimes, you feel compelled to travel overseas.

Well, not often. But I’d appreciate your insight on that last element.

Happy Change of Venue Friday, a day a legal blogger might fantasize about taking a wine tour of France. No, I probably won’t be going. But the idea has a great nose.

My usual invitations are along the lines of a lawyer CLE staged in a wood-paneled conference room: “Nuts and Bolts of Administrative Law,” “What Attorneys MUST Know About the New UCC Changes” “Everything They DON’T Want You To Know About the Revised Securities Regulations”

You get the picture. Important. Significant. A bit drowsy.

So when I received another note headed “Press Invitation,” I did not expect much.

But then I spied the words “international wine competition held in France.”

It’s on April 5. And did I mention it’s in FRANCE? Could I go? Dare I go?

Here’s a piece of their marketing.

wine competition invitation for Bourg, FranceBut … How could I miss the administrative law extravaganza? The insurance business coverage limits analysis? And that panel discussion on employment law tips for the feedlot industry? How could all of that odorous content remain uncovered? Sacré bleu!

Ah, how beautiful Bourg, France, must be in the spring. Don’t we all deserve a junket?

Here is my analysis thus far. I would like you to chime in on whether a legal commentator should travel for a wine competition:

  • Pro: A wine competition and the legal industry both relate to the work of judges. I mean, that’s super-obvious.
  • Con: A junket of this sort might lead a writer to consider other paths and to desert equally deserving “serious” (“non-wine”) professions.

So you see my dilemma.

Let me know what you think. In the meantime, I will use the weekend to develop my nose on a variety of vintages and varietals. I await your counsel.

wine animated: Developing a new writing beat requires dedication, discernment.

Developing a new writing beat requires dedication, discernment.