No, it's not Trump Tower, but close. Welcome to Orlando, site of the 2015 meeting of the NABE Communications Section.

No, it’s not Trump Tower, but close. Welcome to Orlando, site of the 2015 meeting of the NABE Communications Section.

In early October, a few of us from Arizona Attorney Magazine had the opportunity to present at a national conference. Today, I’m happy to share great recaps of those two presentations.

Karen Holub, our Art Director, and I spoke at the annual conference of the National Association of Bar Executives Communications Section. It was held in Orlando, which is a (head) trip of its own.

My plenary presentation was on the topic of “the art of presenting.” It was a blast, and I was privileged to share the podium with the talented and long-suffering Catherine Sanders Reach of the Chicago Bar Association. She provided invaluable content to the banquet room of communicators. And I provided … well, why don’t you read the terrific coverage we got from the talented and generous writer Marilyn Cavicchia.

Attendees gather to hear us talk about the art of presenting.

Attendees gather to hear us talk about the art of presenting.

True professional Catherine Sanders Reach exudes patience while Communications Section Chair Russell Rawlings and I trade picture-taking.

True professional Catherine Sanders Reach exudes patience while Communications Section Chair Russell Rawlings and I trade picture-taking.

The day before, Karen presented with terrific colleagues from San Francisco and Nashville on design for the non-designer. Her presentation was funny and valuable, and she simply crushed it. Here’s how Marilyn described that session.

And here is a photo of Karen presenting.

Karen Holub explains design for a roomful of non-designers. She spoke slowly.

Karen Holub explains design for a roomful of non-designers. She spoke slowly.

Her slides were eye-opening (which is what you want in slides). Among my favorites was this one, which chastised all of us in legal publications for our often too-easy use of images like gavels (and scales of justice, omigod the scales) to illustrate complex concepts. Try harder, she suggested, and you’ll be surprised what can happen.

Enough with the gavels in legal journalism, ok?

Enough with the gavels in legal journalism, ok?

Finally, at the Friday closing luncheon, those of us in the State Bar of Arizona were recognized for professional achievement. My terrific colleague Alberto Rodriguez accepted an award for the Bar’s “Finish the Ballot” campaign. And I got an award for leadership.

Alberto Rodriguez and I with awards from the National Association of Bar Executives, Orlando, Fla., Oct. 2, 2015.

Alberto Rodriguez and I with awards from the National Association of Bar Executives, Orlando, Fla., Oct. 2, 2015.

You can read more about the honors here.

Alberto Rodriguez, State Bar of Arizona, right, and fellow honorees at the National Association Of Bar Executives Communications Section workshop, Oct. 2, 2015.

Alberto Rodriguez, State Bar of Arizona, right, and fellow honorees at the National Association Of Bar Executives Communications Section workshop, Oct. 2, 2015.

Over time, I’ve learned that presenting and participating in professional service yield great benefits, and that the considerable time we put in garners much in return. I hope you agree.

Congratulations to my great fellow-workers on your achievements and willingness to lead.

Rep. Luis Garcia, Florida, speaks (without his passport)

Recent Arizona events have shined the nation’s attention on the Grand Canyon State. And amidst that focus, it’s been easy to forget the country’s recent fixation with Arizona’s main industry: immigration news.

SB1070 may have many far-reaching effects. But one effect that is too little noticed is its conveyance of a “word windfall” to columnists, reporters and bloggers. And once the past week’s tragic events fade into memory, I am certain those writers will return their attention to the article-giving bosom of our state’s immigration regime.

In the past year, we’ve seen how much other states enjoy using Arizona, either as a cautionary tale or as a shining beacon of reverse-immigration (“Keep your tired, and your poor, and your huddled masses …”).

One sign that we remain the undisputed champion of state exemplars comes out of Florida this week. That state, like others, is considering enacting laws similar to Arizona’s (who said we don’t export anything?). It’s reported that a Florida state legislator has taken to wearing his passport to the lawmakers’ chamber. He wants to make the point that his Latino heritage is important, but his American citizenship should not be questioned.

The passport as a fashion and legal accessory—that could be the new big thing.

And for those of you traveling to our fair state who may have some concern about how welcome you will be, there are services that can apply for and procure your passport—fast. At least one service cites Arizona’s law as a reason to hire them.

So fear not. The attention of Americans may be fickle and fleeting, and our mild-mannered gun laws may occupy them for the moment. But to their minds, we remain, more than anything else, the “Show Us Your Papers” State.

My post yesterday about Jim Morrison’s pardon in Florida for 1969 charges got some feedback. In case you didn’t read a comment posted yesterday, I’m pasting it in here:

“The Doors obviously know nothing about the law because if they did, they would realize the pardon wipes out the two convictions that Morrison was found guilty of by a jury. Expunging the record would merely seal the case from the eyes of the public. How in the world is anyone going to expunge this case from the minds of millions of Doors fans all over the world? This statement from them is misguided. They already got the apology. Under Florida law, and the laws of most states, only the family can elect to pursue expunging. The Morrison family have had 41 years to do it and have elected not to. The pardon was appropriate in this case and the Doors should respect that this matter is now officially closed, in my opinion. Any credible lawyer would not have advised the Doors to put this statement out in this form. The timing of this statement is suspect, also, given the fact that the month prior to the pardon, the Doors were very much in favor of it. To me, this statement makes them seem like ingrates in the eyes of their fans. Further, Jim Morrison’s father voiced his full support for the pardon before he died in 2008. He told MSNBC from what I’ve read that he endorses the idea of a pardon because he was told a pardon would erase the charges, which it did. I’m troubled that the Doors would attempt to further a matter that has been legally resolved. As of 12-9-10, Jim Morrison is no longer guilty in the state of Florida. What is the problem?”

And then I got an e-mail from someone (I believe an Arizona lawyer) providing more background on the story. It was a link to a more complete history of the case and the pardon process. The online content also chided online commentators (gulp) for opining on the matter without sufficient knowledge.

Well, if THAT’s the new standard … !

Of course, some of you may have noted that I used the post merely as a vehicle to convey some great Doors song titles and lyrics. Some were obvious, others less so.

Did you get them all?

The Jim Morrison kerfuffle also taught me something else important: There is a “Doors Collectors Magazine.” Very cool.

Get reading.

Forget electing a President. Florida officials couldn’t even make a decision about what tie to wear anymore without igniting a national firestorm.

This week, Florida, with the whole Eastern seaboard, has been a rider on a snowstorm. And this month the storm grew fiercer, as the Florida Board of Clemency voted to pardon Doors frontman Jim Morrison. He had been arrested and charged with lewd and lascivious conduct in 1969, based on his actions at a Miami concert. (He subsequently died in 1971, while still challenging the charges.) There were claims that Morrison had exposed himself to the audience (which would take “Touch Me” to a different level).

The clemency board acted at the behest of outgoing Florida Governor Charlie Crist—and we couldn’t get much higher than that. Crist has admitted to being a big Doors fan, and he took up the idea at the request of a fellow fan.

You’d think state government has bigger worries than this, but you know what they say: People are strange.

The pardon was not welcome news to Morrison’s family and former bandmates, who are looking a gift pardon in the mouth. Florida officials really lit their fire.

The former Doors musicians believe that the original charges were political grandstanding in the first place, and that the pardon is more of the same. They want the matter expunged, not pardoned.

They have said the same thing since Morrison’s death. But they said the time to hesitate is through.

And while Florida is at it, they say, an apology is in order.

No word yet from the hell freezes over department.

Jim Morrison in 1969

Man o man: A guv can’t even exercise one of the best perks of his office anymore without getting in a tussle. He probably just wanted to break on through (to the Other Side)—Morrison may forgive him, but living fans? Not so much.

We’ll have to say how it all shakes out when the music’s over. Until then, read the band’s complete statement here.