ASU Law School says goodbye to Armstrong Hall

Typically, law schools stay planted in a spot for, I don’t know, an eternity. So it’s definitely news that the ASU Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law is moving to downtown Phoenix this year.

But that means they are leaving behind their home since the school was founded in 1968. And that means a party.

Tomorrow, Friday, May 20, the school invites “alumni, friends, supporters, faculty, staff, and current students to come together for a day of festivities to celebrate the past and prepare for the move to the Arizona Center for Law and Society in downtown Phoenix. We will also honor Professor David Kader as he retires after 36 years on the ASU Law faculty and 41 years as a law professor.”

The “toast and roast” to the old building will be preceded by actual educational offerings (where lunch will be served to those attending those offerings). I’ve included the agenda and offerings below.

More detail about the festivities is here.

Because space is limited, be sure to register for the free event (though voluntary donations support law student scholarships).

Finally, though time is short, the school would still love to hear your memories and anecdotes; maybe they can become part of Friday’s event.

Do you have a story to share?

“If you would like to share in advance your story, memories, photos or videos for the Toast & Roast portion of the event, please click here to upload them. We can accept files up to 2MB. Contact Julia Moore at (480) 965-3112 if your files are larger than 2MB. If you have questions, contact Keith Chandler at (480) 965-6405.”

When: Friday, May 20, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (lunch will be provided)

Where: Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, ASU, Willard H. Pedrick Great Hall, Room 113

ASU Law School Armstrong Hall exterior

ASU Law School’s Armstrong Hall

Schedule of Events

10 a.m. Check-In & Registration Opens

11 a.m. Welcome | CLE with “Founding Faculty” | Lunch

  • Michael Berch, Emeritus Professor of Law, “The Two Functions of Judicial Decisions: Stare Decisis and Res Judicata Discussion: Analysis of Rush v. Maple Heights
  • The Honorable William C. Canby Jr., United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, “On Teaching Constitutional Law: Then (1968-1980) and Now”
  • Alan Matheson, Emeritus Dean, “Confirmation Hearings for Supreme Court Justices: Running the Gauntlet”
  • Jonathan Rose, Emeritus Professor of Law, “History of Contract Law”

2:30 p.m. Toast & Roast to Armstrong Hall

3:30 p.m. Event Reception & Retirement Celebration for David Kader, Emeritus Professor of Law

ASU Law School Armstrong Hall interior v2

Armstrong Hall

The Arizona Biltmore is the site for the 2015 State Bar of Arizona Convention.

The Arizona Biltmore is the site for the 2015 State Bar of Arizona Convention.

This is annual Convention week at the State Bar of Arizona. As always, a large selection of educational seminars (and fun activities) are packed into the three-day event held in Arizona Biltmore.

More detail about the Convention is here.

As always, Arizona Attorney Magazine staff (yes, that’s me) will cover the annual event.

And as in the past, we will not print a once-a-day hard-copy “Convention Daily.” Instead, I’ll will cover Convention news closer to real time, via the editor’s blog and social media. We will use multiple channels to communicate what’s going on. But the surest way to be sure you see everything is to follow me on Twitter. My name in Twitter is @azatty. You can view all the evolving content here (or at http://twitter.com/azatty, to be specific). I will be tagging everything with the hashtag #azbarcon – so be sure to search for that.

Want to participate? Send me brief stories or story suggestions. Or if you have convention photos, we’d be glad to share them with readers.

And don’t forget to tweet from convention. Use the hashtag #azbarcon.

Questions or suggestions? Reach the Editor, Tim Eigo, on-site at the Biltmore, at 602-908-6991 or via arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

And always feel free to stroll up and say hello. I’ll be hiking all over the Biltmore to cover the goings-on. Or you may catch me at the Arizona Attorney table in the Exhibitor area. If you miss me there, leave your card or a note.

A smiling Justice Antonin Scalia in 2010, by photographer Stephen Masker, Wikimedia Commons

A smiling Justice Antonin Scalia in 2010, by photographer Stephen Masker, Wikimedia Commons

Justice Antonin Scalia came to Phoenix in May, where he spoke to a warm Federalist Society audience.

I was unable to attend, but I am happy to recommend a blog post by Ashley Kasarjian, who did dine and listen to the Justice’s musings.

Ashley is an employment and labor attorney at Snell & Wilmer, as well as the chair of the Arizona Attorney Editorial Board.

Here is a link to her post, which covers the event, which sounds like it was highly entertaining.

I have opted to head my post with an open-source image of Scalia, rather than hijack and copy Ashley’s own great photo of him (though I’m soooo tempted!). To see that, you need to click through and scroll to the bottom of her post (it’s worth it!).

Ashley explained to me that as she approached to get her book signed, she realized her phone-camera settings were not right. So the good Justice had to be delayed for a flicker of a moment (my estimation, not hers), leading to the curmudgeonly gaze (my review, not hers).

But the reaction Ashley engendered may not be unique. I just came across another shot of Justice Scalia, this one on the Arizona GOP website. If anyone had their photo filters set to “charmed” for this particular photo subject, it would be them. And yet … grimace.

You also can see the same photo in this tweet from the @AZGOP:

(Maybe “grimace” is unfair. But he would not be the first public figure to “check out” after, say, the 2,000th photo of the day.)

In any case, it’s always an honor to have a Justice in Arizona to dine, speak, sign, and dash. Enjoy Ashley’s summary.

 

AZ Summit Law School Phoenix Law logoSome news from the folks at Arizona Summit Law School (please feel free to pass it on to people who could benefit):

Arizona Summit Law School, a private law school located in downtown Phoenix, is hosting a one-day event to provide free legal information and limited-scope legal advice and assistance to people seeking help on matters related to family law, general business, probate and estate planning, and landlord/tenant disputes.

Susan Daicoff, director of legal clinics at Summit Law

Susan Daicoff, director of legal clinics at Summit Law

Approximately 50 Summit Law students, faculty, and alumni will be providing pro bono legal services; each student will be supervised by faculty or alumni who are practicing attorneys.  The school hopes to assist as many individuals as possible during its first Access to Justice Day.

“As we enter our tenth year, Arizona Summit Law School is excited to expand its work within our community,” said Susan Daicoff, director of legal clinics at Summit Law. “While our clinics have helped many clients over the years, from family law to our work at the Human Services Campus, this free day of legal assistance allows more of us to come together as a law school, to serve more people in our community who may not be able to afford legal advice.”

When: Friday, March 13, 2015, 10 am – 2 pm

Where: Arizona Summit Law School, 1 North Central Ave. in downtown Phoenix

Check-in will be held in the school’s lobby area where a pre-screening occurs. Individuals will then be guided to the appropriate station.

Spanish-speaking translators will be available.

Dean Shirley Mays Arizona Summit Law School

Dean Shirley Mays, Arizona Summit Law School

Individuals seeking assistance with complex issues requiring more than a short consultation will be referred to appropriate lawyers and organizations, including legal services agencies (community organizations who offer free or reduced-cost legal assistance), local attorneys, and Summit Law alumni.

“One of the pillars of our mission here at Summit Law is to serve the underserved,” said Arizona Summit Law Dean Shirley Mays. “For us, that means more than our efforts to diversify the legal profession by creating more opportunities for women and people of color to obtain a high quality legal education. That also means expanding our efforts to provide high quality legal information and advice to those in the community who might not otherwise have the financial circumstances to meet with a legal professional.”

For questions related to parking, directions or how the event will be structured, email Probono@azsummitlaw.edu. Note: No legal advice will be provided through this email address, and no information or legal matters will be reviewed in advance.

Legal Marketing Association logoThis Friday, I have the pleasure of moderating a great annual event: a panel of corporate counsel at a lunchtime gathering of the Southwest chapter of the Legal Marketing Association.

Before I get to the meat of the matter, be sure to read and register here (the speaker names are at this end of this post).

And now, 3 reasons you should be there on Friday:

1. Your question could be asked.

That’s right. I am seeking (here and via Twitter) great questions to put to attorneys who are in-house counsel at companies and nonprofits. What do you want to know about their work life? Curious how to get hired, in-house or as outside counsel? Secretly yearn to know how not to get fired in either of those two roles? Send me your question(s) to arizona.attorney@azbar.org (or tweet it to me @azatty).

2. These people are canaries.

No, I am not insulting them with a bird reference. I merely analogize them to the proverbial canary in a coal mine. There, the little birds could spot trouble before humans could—and communicated it in a disconcerting way.

AzAt 2011 GC panel headline corporate counsel legal marketing associationCorporate counsel are likewise on the leading edge—of the legal profession’s economy. As purchasers of outside legal services, they are extremely well informed about the state of things. As a result, they hire more, hire less, and examine bills with a fine-tooth comb (or whatever the opposite of that is). They also can gauge our profession by the number of others gunning for their positions. So if you’re looking for guidance on how the legal profession is emerging (or not) from a bad recession, listening to a corporate counsel is a pretty good strategy.

3. They may talk about you.

Well, OK, not exactly you. But I have asked the panelists to consider some anecdotes (omitting names, of course) that explore some of the great things outside counsel have done. But I also asked for their cautionary tales, those that arise out of law firm fails. Nervous-making and exciting all at once, right? That’s our goal.

So, once more with the registration link. I hope to see you there.

And here are the great speakers on tap:

Panelists:

  • Karim Adatia – Insight, Associate General Counsel & Director, Legal (Global Sales, Corporate and IP)
  • Steve Beaver – Aspect, Senior Vice President & General Counsel
  • Lukas Grabiec – Microchip Technology Inc., Senior Corporate Counsel
  • Carmen Neuberger – Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Senior Vice President, Legal Affairs and General Counsel
Civil Rights Act of 1964 President Johnson signs

President Lyndon Johnson signs into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Beginning Friday and continuing through next week, a series of Arizona events marks the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Phoenix events are covered in some detail on a dedicated Facebook page. They include:

  • The unveiling of a commemorative mural, Burton Barr Library, Friday, 10 a.m.
  • Voter registration/civic engagement event, State Capitol lawn, Saturday, 9 a.m.
  • Celebration dinner, First Institutional Baptist Church, Saturday, 5 p.m.
  • Community celebration, Carver Museum and Cultural Center, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 newspaper headlineAs the site describes the legislation:

“The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88–352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation in the United States that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public (known as ‘public accommodations’).”

“Powers given to enforce the act were initially weak, but were supplemented during later years. Congress asserted its authority to legislate under several different parts of the United States Constitution, principally its power to regulate interstate commerce under Article One (section 8), its duty to guarantee all citizens equal protection of the laws under the Fourteenth Amendment and its duty to protect voting rights under the Fifteenth Amendment. The Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964 at the White House.”

Tonight is another in a series of successful State Bar of Arizona mixers. These networking events allow members to mingle in a relaxed atmosphere. Here is the information.

Networking Event at The Lodge To Support Eve’s Place

Please join us at The Lodge for an attorney networking event on Thursday, May 24, 2012 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. to support Eve’s Place, a nonprofit domestic violence shelter.  Free appetizers will be served.

Please bring paper goods to donate to Eve’s Place. The shelter needs paper towels, facial tissues, and toilet paper.

This networking event is being brought to you by the State Bar of Arizona’s Young Lawyer Division, Sole Practitioner & Small Firm Section, Tax Law Section, and Antitrust Law Section; Arizona Association of Defense Counsel Young Lawyer Division; and Defense Research Institute Young Lawyer Division.

The Lodge is located in Old Town Scottsdale at:

4422 N. 75th St., Scottsdale, AZ 85251

Here is a map:

Does The Lodge have a moose? You won’t know if you don’t go!

Thank you to our sponsors:

Perez Law Group

Vocational Diagnostics, Inc.

One Neck IT Services

CBRE, Inc.

LexisNexis Web Marketing Services

www.LawLinks.com

Other Donation items:

Eve’s Place will gladly accept your donation of gently used clothes, house wares and collectibles at their thrift shop, Eve’s Treasures, located at 10765 West Peoria Avenue, in the Sun Bowl Plaza Shopping Center.

For donations of furniture and other large items, call 623-583-1434 to schedule a pickup. Or you can bring them to Eve’s Place offices, at: 8101 N 35th Ave # D10, Phoenix, AZ 85051. 602-995-7450.

Items may also be brought to the Perez Law Group offices:

Glendale Office (Main Office):

5622 West Glendale Avenue

Glendale, AZ 85301

office: 602-252-9937, ext. 13

fax: 623-939-3214

Phoenix Office:

2415 E. Camelback Rd., Suite 700

Phoenix, AZ 85016

Office:  602-553-1004

Fax:  623-939-3214