What looks to be a remarkable program is on tap for this Friday at the ASU Law School.

Titled “Dialogues on Detention: Applying Lessons from Criminal Justice Reform to the Immigration Detention System,” it is part of the Public Dialogue Series of advocacy group Human Rights First. (CLE credit may be available.)

Discussions will focus on: gaps in legal representation, alternatives to detention, privatization; and conditions of detention. Panelists also will explore whether lessons we have learned from criminal justice reform can inform immigration detention reform.

Here is more information about the Friday event:

Speakers include:

  • Dora Schriro, former director of the Arizona Department of Corrections
  • Lindsay Marshall, Executive Director, Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project
  • Arizona State Representative John Kavanagh (R-8)
  • Dodie Ledbetter, Deputy Court Administrator and former Detention Director for the Pima County Juvenile Court Center (Tucson)
  • Victoria Lopez, ACLU Arizona
  • Milagros Cisneros, Assistant Federal Public Defender, District of Arizona
  • Andy Silverman, Joseph M. Livermore Professor of Law and Director of Clinical Programs, University of Arizona James E. Rodgers College of Law

You may register here. More detail on the Dialogues on Detention Series is available here.

Helpfully, organizers also provide a list of reading materials related to the dialogues.

Sara Lofland (left) and Tally Kingsnorth of the Florence Project at the State Bar of Arizona, Nov. 10, 2011

This morning, representatives from the Florence Immigrant & Refugee Rights Project presented at the State Bar of Arizona on pro bono opportunities (I wrote about the event earlier this week). The comments were insightful, and speakers indicated that the need for legal representation is constant.

Thanks to Florence Project lawyers Tally Kingsnorth and Sara Lofland for their presentation.

So let’s get right to the point. If you’re an Arizona lawyer and are interested in offering your time, or if you have questions about the Project, write to Tally Kingsnorth. She is the Pro Bono Coordinator and a Senior Staff Attorney there. Her email is tkingsnorth@firrp.org.

Not sure you’re quite up to sending that email yet? No problem; there is another path. Click here to read more about the Project and the work they do. You’ll get some insight into their needs in immigration and dependency, and their mission to help adults and children. It may answer many of your questions.

And then you should contact Tally. Did I mention her email? It’s tkingsnorth@firrp.org.

Finally, if you’re still not sure about dipping your toe into this initiative, then maybe it’s time to get your toes tappin‘. That’s where Music for Justice comes in.

Music for Justice is a benefit concert on November 19. But given the great venue and the act, most of the benefit will accrue to the attendees. It will be held at The Rhythm Room in Phoenix (1019 E. Indian School Road, 602-265-4842), and the headliners are KT and the Repeat Offenders (don’t you love lawyer-band names?).

As the promotional material says, KT and the Repeat Offenders “is a 12-piece, high-energy rhythm and blues band that plays blues, 60s R&B, Santana, rock, and Motown music.” Among the players will be former Judge (and current Florence Project President) Noel Fidel on trumpet.

Want to see more about the band? Click here, and go to Youtube to search for more of their work.

Tickets are $20 in advance, or $25 at the door. Proceeds from Music for Justice will benefit the Florence Immigrant & Refugee Rights Project. (The Project is also on Facebook. Why don’t you go ahead and Like them? Arizona Attorney Magazine has.)

You may purchase tickets to the blues-y event here. Or you could mail a check (yup, that still works) to Florence Project, P.O. Box 654, Florence, AZ 85132 with “Nov. 19 fundraiser” in the memo line. They will mail your tickets to you.

Finally, in case I failed to provide it, here is Tally’s email: tkingsnorth@firrp.org.

And remember: There’s no groove like the Justice groove. Let’s get moving.

Here are a few more photos from today’s great CLE.

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