The 'G' on the mountainside means you're in Globe, Ariz.The 'G' on the mountainside means you're in Globe, Ariz.

The ‘G’ on the mountainside means you’re in Globe, Ariz.

Earlier this month, I described my trip to Globe, Ariz., to cover a story. That day, I promised some photos from my trip east. Today, I offer the images. They include my tours of the historic courthouse and jail that are noteworthy elements of a historic mining downtown.

Have a terrific—and historically legal—weekend.

Click a photo to enlarge and see it in a slideshow.

 

Gila County, Ariz., courthouse, by Ken Lund

Gila County, Ariz., courthouse, by Ken Lund

Arizona’s landscape is dotted with some beautiful courthouses, many still in operation. But for those that are not, finding a suitable “chapter two” can be a challenge.

In Gila County, a wonderful old courthouse faced an empty future. But, as an Arizona Republic story explains, it has been transformed into the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts.

I may be on an adaptive reuse kick this month (see my story from yesterday about auto dealerships transforming in Boston), but I was very taken with this Arizona story. You can read the whole thing here.

And for more information on the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts, go here and here.

Ornament on historic Tucson, Ariz., courthouse

Ornament on historic Tucson, Ariz., courthouse

Just a short item today pointing you to a long article—but you didn’t want to work too much today anyway, right?

I recently was sent a story by Tucson Judge José Luis Castillo Jr. He has penned an essay online that tells us much about legal history and what preservation really is (and what it is not).

He writes about the history of Arizona’s oldest working courtroom. Read his article here.

“Working” is an important word, because much of what makes it vital as a teaching tool may be endangered. Jump to the closer paragraphs of his piece, if you must, to read his insightful conclusion.

But give yourself the time to read the whole thing. There, you will see the role a room has played in our history—and even in Hollywood.

Have a great weekend.

 

Last fall, the Arizona Superior Court for Maricopa County heeded the longtime plea of lawyers when they created an express line for attorneys.

The court recognized the frustration of those bar members who must enter the courthouse often, sometimes more than once a day. To ensure that they’re never late for a trial or calendar call, those lawyers have always had to arrive super-early, just in case there’s a slow-moving line at security.

In October, the new lawyer line was created. But the court personnel have noted that the entrance is used less than they would have expected.

This week, the court issued is a reminder of this great new feature:

Superior Court’s Attorney Express Line

In order to alleviate lawyers waiting in long lines to enter the courthouse with members of the public, Maricopa County Superior Court has designated the First Avenue entrance of the East Court Building for attorneys only.

Once lawyers enter through the new Attorney Express Line, they simply show their State Bar of Arizona membership card and proceed through screening.

“We want everyone to get to court on time,” Security Director Edward DeCoste said. “The new entrance also enhances public safety by eliminating any potential confrontations between attorneys and members of the public.”

Attorneys still may enter through the other existing entrances but they are encouraged to utilize the Attorney Express Line.

“I think it works great,” said Bruce L. Bauman, a family and bankruptcy law attorney. “In the past, I was cutting my court appearances close. The new line is faster and much more convenient. I hope the court continues to make it available.”

Follow the Superior Court on Facebook and Twitter.

On Friday, Maricopa County dedicated its new court tower, officially taking ownership of the 16-story structure at Second Avenue and Madison Street in downtown Phoenix.

Though operations will not commence in the building until Arizona Centennial Day in February 2012, county staff and supervisors decided to formally mark the delivery of the certificate of occupancy.

As workers made tweaks and final adjustments, dignitaries gathered Friday morning in the building’s lobby for brief remarks by those who played a large part in the building’s completion.

“On time and under budget” was repeated by numerous speakers, clearly pleased to be able to report the fact.

Supervisor Don Stapley said that the county had saved $198 million in financing costs by building when it did—rather than delaying, as detractors had recommended. The building is now debt-free, he said.

“This building is a testament to the courage and tenacity of the board and staff in the face of their challengers,” he said. “The citizens of the county for the next 100 years will be the winners.”

Supervisor Fulton Brock said that the building’s inscription—“The first duty of society is justice”—is what the board and the county stand for.

“This building is the envy of every judicial district in the nation,” Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox said. “When Maricopa County sets its mind to something, there’s no stopping it.”

Also speaking was County Manager David Smith, who thanked all of the contractors and vendors.

“Today we celebrate the success of a great team in what will be a 100-year building.”

Smith described some of the many unique elements of the new structure, such as separate waiting areas for victims and defendants, holding cells that will accommodate more than 1,000 inmates, and a variety of courtroom designs made to address varying needs. Smith also noted that there were more than 2 million work hours on the project with no lost-time accidents.

Assistant County Manager for Public Works Kenny Harris praised the three construction and design teams that led the operation: HDR, Parsons and Arcadis.

Event attendees stood atop one of the building’s featured elements: a terrazzo tile floor depicting the flow of the Salt River.

Representing the court (for Presiding Judge Norm Davis, who was unable to attend the Veterans Day event) was Judge Eddward Ballinger. He said, “This project represents an example of the prudent and wise leadership by supervisors and county staff. Of all the bickering we see today, this is an example of efficient bipartisanship.”

Here is another story on the opening. And the Court Tower has its own web page here.

More photos are below. And more are available on the Arizona Attorney Magazine Facebook page.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.