Think Millennials are a challenge? Here comes Generation Z.

Think Millennials are a challenge? Here comes Generation Z.

As we scan the business and law practice landscape, there is one segment that appears to be the most coveted and baffling. Of course, I’m talking about the Millennial generation, whose qualities and foibles are argued to be incredibly unique. To meet that generation, it is suggested, you need to relearn basic human interactions. And if you hope to engage that generation, entire paradigms must shift.

If you detect a touch of skepticism in my tone, you must possess a Boomer-trained sense of snark. And it’s true that my extensive interactions with Millennials tell me they seek transparency, candor, and generally less B.S. than previous generations may have been led to expect. Well, bully for them, to use an old-school phrase. (And bully for all of us older folks who agree with the Millennials on that.)

A free webinar on May 25 (1:00 pm EDT) will offer some insight into those colleagues who are of the younger generations. As organizers describe:

“One of the biggest challenges faced by business owners today is attracting and retaining great people. Millennials make up an enormous part of today’s workforce, and survey after survey finds that this generation values flexibility as much and sometimes more than compensation.”

Citrix Webinar Gene-Marks

Gene Marks

Columnist, author, business owner, and technology expert Gene Marks will cover:

  • How trends and regulations in minimum wage, paid time off, and overtime will impact your ability to find and motivate millennial employees.
  • The newest and innovative cloud based technologies that are helping companies of all sizes recruit, manage, compensate and make them more attractive to the millennial workforce.
  • The latest developments in healthcare reform that are most important to millennials and how smart employers are controlling their healthcare costs in 2016 while continuing to be competitive in the job market.

You can get more information and register here.

And in the meantime, I point you to three recent articles on communicating with younger colleagues, whether they be Millennials or in Gen Z. The first covers general best practices in communication.

The second two articles address challenges faced by bar associations and anyone who offers programming to a more demanding and (if you ask me) astute generation of attorneys. Thank you to Omnipress for sharing articles about offering education programs to Millennials in both continuing-education settings and in annual conferences.

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This month: Free online learning from Citrix ShareFile

The State Bar Family Law Institute will be held on Thursday and Friday, Jan. 21 and 22.

The State Bar Family Law Institute will be held on Thursday and Friday, Jan. 21 and 22.

Planned your whole workweek yet? Got some time free on Thursday and Friday?

You should consider attending what has often been one of the most helpful continuing education programs of the year: the Family Law Institute of the State Bar.

The two-day event occurs Thursday and Friday, January 22 and 22.

The Institute will be held at the Desert Willow Conference Center, 4340 E. Cotton Center Boulevard, Suite 100, in Phoenix.

family-law highlightedI’ve attended the conference in the past and found it helpful and the instructors well selected. And this year’s location is, in my mind, an improvement over the past. The space is bright, new and the classroom space is modern and technology-adept. And the snacks. Hmmm.

A few years ago, a friend created an entire blog to describe CLE opportunities based largely on the food that was offered at each. (Sadly, the visionary piece of journalism is now defunct.) But I imagine she would have given Desert Willow high marks, not just for its lunch buffet, but also for the panoply of treats and snacks on offer throughout the day.

In what world is being schooled on family law—or any law—not improved by a warm and salty pretzel ’round about 3:00 pm? No world I want to be part of.

More information, including the faculty and registration, is here.

And offers related to the Institute can be found here.

What can event organizers learn from a man with cool glasses eating a Goo Goo Cluster?

Quite a bit, I’d wager.

Niche Digital Conference trailer

Carl Landau, Niche Digital, eats a Nashville specialty.

Happy Change of Venue Friday. That off-kilter thought occurred when a conference notification arrived in my email. I will read most all copy (words) that come my way, but typically I am loath to click through to time-sucking video content. And yet there he was, this guy, about to eat a Nashville confectionary delicacy. Click.

What I got was a charming and idiosyncratic view into the Niche Media Conference. Its annual event was in Tempe this past year, and it’s good stuff. (Yes, Arizona Attorney Magazine is niche media, and proudly so. That makes all you legal eagles “niche readers.” Congratulations!)

How do you get people to use their scarce resources—time, money, attention—to travel across country to attend an educational conference? If you’re like most organizations, you inundate prospects with emails and printed materials, flooding their minds and short patience with all of the content content content that will be available, but only if you REGISTER NOW.

Niche Media logoWe’ve all been on the receiving end of those pitches.

Well, if you’re Carl Landau with Niche Media, you try something else. You recognize that people attend events for all kinds of reasons, not all easily categorized and put in a formal box. You decide to try to connect to viewers on a deeper level. You realize that people do want content (yes, indeed), but what they yearn for is a genuine transformative experience. They want to arrive in a place whose guides (some organizations call them “presenters” or “PowerPoint drones”) will challenge them in fun and innovative ways. It’s at places like that, people think, that they will learn the most cutting-edge industry strategies.

And they may even want some local color. That’s where the Goo Goo Clusters come in.

I was at a great Nashville conference a few years ago, and I cannot say enough about that wondrous creation. I even waxed poetic about it (and its Moon Pie partner) on my Tumblr stream.

Two great tastes taste good together: Nashville specialties Goo Goo Cluster and Mini Moon Pie.

Two great tastes taste good together: Nashville specialties Goo Goo Cluster and Mini Moon Pie.

So enjoy Carl’s video introduction to the conference; it is embedded down below. The conference may be one you’ll never attend. But the video may provide you ideas about how to make your own events and content come alive, and how to get your viewers or other audience members firing on all cylinders.

For myself, I plan to steal shamelessly from the approaches Carl uses so well. (And I love that long closing tracking shot! Am I crazy, or did I see that used in Alfred Hitchcock’s TV show, when he sat in a high-backed chair far away from us in a looooong room, as the camera crept closer and closer, all while Al told us what we were about to see? Hitchcock fans, let me know!)

And I’d suggest the State Bar of Arizona might want to try an evocative video like his. But until they do, be sure to view what’s coming up at the Bar’s own June convention.

Here’s Carl. Have a great—and Cluster-filled—weekend.

If you are seeking some lunchtime learning, a few upcoming webinars may fill the bill. The following are co-sponsored by Fordham Law School and The National Law Journal.

They are free to “attend,” but pre-registration is required. (See below for web registration details.)

And are any of the topics something you’d like to see covered in Arizona Attorney? Let me know, and we could slot an article.

Here is the information from Fordham:

Ethical Issues for Criminal Practitioners
October 2, 2012 at 1 p.m. Eastern

Panelists will focus on the ethical issues that often arise during criminal cases and the recent developments in ethics and professional responsibility.  Speakers include: Hon. Jed S. Rakoff, Judge for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York; Bruce Green, Professor and Director of the Louis Stein Center for Legal Ethics at Fordham Law School; Rita M. Glavin, Partner at Seward & Kissel LLP; and Sylvia Shaz Schweder, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York.

The Foreclosure Crisis in the Courts
October 16, 2012 at 1 p.m. Eastern

Discussion will center on important trends in foreclosure law in the wake of the housing crisis. Speakers include: Nestor Davidson, Professor of Law and Founding Director of the Urban Law Center at Fordham Law School; Bruce J. Bergman, Partner at Berkman, Henoch, Peterson, Peddy & Fenchel, P.C.; and Meghan Faux, Director of the Foreclosure Prevention Project at South Brooklyn Legal Services.

Navigating Prosecutorial Discretion in Immigration Law
October 30, 2012 at 1 p.m. Eastern

President Obama’s recent prosecutorial discretion initiative, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) relief process will be the focus of discussion. Speakers include: Jennifer Gordon, Professor of Law at Fordham Law School; Marielena Hincapié, Executive Director at the National Immigration Law Center; and David A. Martin, Warner-Brooker Distinguished Professor of International Law at the University of Virginia School of Law and Deputy General Counsel, Department of Homeland Security (2009-2011); General Counsel, Immigration and Naturalization Service (1995-1998).

The Boundaries of Fair Use After Cariou v. Prince
November 13, 2012 at 1 p.m. Eastern

Panelists will analyze the decision waiting to be made in Cariou v. Prince and the impact the case will have on the boundaries of visual art, fair use, and freedom of expression, particularly in visual art. Speakers include: Sonia Katyal, Joseph M. McLaughlin Professor of Law at Fordham Law School; Dale Cendali, Partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP; Virginia Rutledge, Attorney and former Vice President and General Counsel for Creative Commons; and Christine Steiner, Special Counsel for Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP.

To register, go to law.com/ethics, law.com/foreclosure, law.com/immigration or law.com/fairuse to register.

Dates:

  • October 2, 2012 (Ethics)
  • October 16, 2012 (Foreclosure)
  • October 30, 2012 (Immigration)
  • November 13, 2012 (Fair Use)

Time: 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. Eastern