Unimpressed with the world? You don't have to show it. Resting bitch face

Unimpressed with the world? You don’t have to show it.

Today, I point you to an article about “resting bitch face.” There are many reasons for this, including:

  • Because the author provides excellent strategies lawyers can use to convert their (typical?) expressions of disdain into something a bit more, um, neutral.
  • Because she points us to animal examples of said Resting Bitch Face. I can’t even.
  • Because the term itself is so expressive and so much fun to say.

Articulate Attorney book Johnson and HunterBut that’s not all. I also recommend it because Marsha Hunter is a great writer and thinker. I’ve read her stuff and even seen her present in person, and she understands on a very deep level what makes someone a communicator and what makes someone the opposite. Hence RBF.

You can read her recent article here.

And here are a few words I wrote about Marsha and her partner in communications crime, Brian K. Johnson. (And here is a great article that Brian wrote for us in Arizona Attorney Magazine.)

Finally, I heartily recommend their more recent book, titled The Articulate Attorney: Public Speaking for Lawyers. You can find it online here. Here’s hoping the face you offer the world grows more placid and less aggravated.

It's OK to let your inner emotions remain unexpressed.

It’s OK to let your inner emotions remain unexpressed. (Photo: Reddit/Doo1717)

Lawyers Talking article Jan 2013 by Brian K. JohnsonI try to keep the shilling to a minimum here on the blog. But as I suspect you appreciate a good deal, I am passing one on—today only!

I became quite a fan of the work done by Brian Johnson and Marsha Hunter a few years ago. That’s when I saw a presentation of theirs at the Maricopa County Bar Association. Their topic was (and is) effective communication by lawyers.

On the blog, I have mentioned Brian to you before, and I pointed you to his complete article, which we published in Arizona Attorney Magazine.

Today, Brian and Marsha launch an online marketplace. In celebration, they are offering a bargain: 50 percent off the purchase of either of their books (available in four formats):

The Articulate Advocate: New Techniques in Persuasion for Trial LawyersRegular price: $24.99 print, $15.99 digital

The Articulate Attorney: Public Speaking for Lawyers, Second Edition Regular price: $24.99 print, $15.99 digital

Brian Johnson Marsha Hunter Articulate AdvocateBrian Johnson Marsha Hunter Articulate AttorneyAs they tell me, “The 50% discount will be given automatically; no special code required. The discount is good today only, May 14, 2014, until midnight (Central).”

Don’t say I never pointed you toward a deal. Read more (and maybe purchase) here. And then let me know how you’ve integrated their lessons into your practice.

(NB: I am not getting any benefit from sharing this news with you. No one sent me a free book or offered me a weekend in their Cabo time-share. I just think these books are helpful to practicing lawyers.)

Lawyers Talking article Jan 2013 by Brian K. JohnsonBefore January passes, I will pass on a few reading suggestions from the current issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine.

The first recommendation is an article by an accomplished expert who is not a lawyer himself. Brian K. Johnson, an award-winning author, instructs readers on how to communicate best with others on topics that may be complex. Titled “Lawyers Talking, Fast and Slow,” his article opens:

“When conferring with a lawyer, my brain is focused on just one thing: Help me figure out this thorny issue! Whether talking to my trust lawyer about choosing an executor, or the real estate lawyer who advises me about my 94-year-old father’s 40 acres of farmland with the problematic deed, my goal is the same. Has my money been well spent on sound advice?”

“Your clients most certainly share a similar desire. They need you to explain—clearly—an arcane or troublesome legal issue, and they want you to provide counsel on a course of action. Once the issue is fully dissected and understood, you and your client can figure out how to proceed.”

“Of course, all of that is more challenging than you might think.”

You’re not joking. The author is adept at setting out some lessons you wish were common sense but often are not.

Continue reading Brian’s great article here.


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