Tim Hogan speaks at the University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Tim Hogan speaks at the University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Last week, an organization that does great legal work took a moment—as it does every year—to honor a lawyer for work that goes above and beyond.

Congratulations to the William E. Morris Institute for Justice for taking that moment on Thursday, October 29, to honor Tim Hogan, Executive Director of the Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest.

The event at the University Club was the Morris Institute’s annual Phoenix fundraiser, but it was also an opportunity to hear from some of our legal community’s smartest folks as they weighed in on Tim and his impressive legal career.

Among those who spoke was the Sierra Club’s Sandy Bahr, who recounted numerous times Hogan had collaborated with others on important litigation.

You probably couldn’t put it better than Bahr did as she said, “Tim is a friend to Arizona.”

Sandy Bahr, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Sandy Bahr, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Paul Eckstein spoke warmly about Tim Hogan, “the legal polymath.” Eckstein said there’s hardly an area of law Hogan hasn’t touched, including education, finance, school funding, consumer protection, utility rates, environmental protection, the constitutionality of laws (I stopped writing after a while!).

Eckstein reminded attendees that “60 Minutes is in the waiting room” were once the words most feared by powerful people. Smiling, Eckstein said that dreaded sentence has been replaced by “Tim Hogan has just sued us.”

Paul Eckstein, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

Paul Eckstein, University Club, Phoenix, Oct. 29, 2015.

When Hogan rose to offer his obligatory remarks, the typically taciturn attorney would have none of it. He reminded listeners that, “We’re all in this together, and we all contribute to each others’ successes.”

Virtually every lawsuit named that evening, Hogan said, was a collaboration between organizations and multiple lawyers. In particular, Hogan praised the Morris Institute’s Ellen Katz, who has advanced so many cases and causes in Arizona.

William E. Morris Institute for Justice logoHogan’s wry sense of humor was on display, though, when he admitted it was sometimes necessary for him to be absent from settlement discussions, as “Some other folks just self-incinerate when they see me.”

He also reminded the group that he routinely gives Ellen Katz a hard time for not charging for this annual event. (Her response, as always: a smile.)

The experienced Hogan used his remarks to tell attendees that they needed to contribute however they could, and to step up to help communities with little: “Next to English-language learners,” Hogan said, “poor people are probably those who are most despised at the Arizona Legislature.”

In the same week, Tim Hogan was inducted into the Maricopa County Bar Association Hall of Fame. Congratulations again to Tim and the many communities his work benefits.

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AZ Center for Law in Public Interest squibUnbelievably, May is about to pass. Before it does, I urge you to read a great article in this month’s issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine.

Every spring, I weigh the wisdom of putting non-arts content into our May issue. After all, over the past decade-plus, readers have grown accustomed to enjoying the amazing work of the lawyer-winners of our Creative Arts Competition in that issue. Non-arts content, I fear, may get lost in the sauce.

But when I heard from Tim Hogan about an anniversary of the Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest, I was hooked. There may be no public interest law firm that has touched on so many vital aspects of a state’s legal health as ACLPI has.

And when I read the draft by Timothy Hogan & Joy Herr-Cardillo, I was doubly impressed. Here’s how the article opens:

Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest logo“The Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The Center started from humble beginnings in 1974 to become one of the most successful public interest law firms in the country. No one could have predicted that the Center would still be an important force for justice in Arizona four decades years after the organization began with nothing more than a desk, a phone and a typewriter—with only one young lawyer to type on it. This is a story about that law firm’s journey.”

Here is the complete story. Please let me know what you think. And let me know which of the Center’s many significant cases have made the biggest impression on you, as an attorney and an Arizonan.

Justice at Stake logoHow do we know the weather is improving in Arizona? Our in-boxes are jammed with invitations to events—some even held outdoors!

Over the next few days, I’ll share a few event details to be sure you know as much as I do (what a low bar that is!).

Today, I mention three events, all occurring late this week. Get your curiosity and your business cards ready to attend:

  • Arizona Advocacy Network/Justice at Stake event. Thursday, Oct. 17, 5:30 pm. REGISTER HERE. Here is the detail:

“Arizona Advocacy Network is continuing our work to promote Fair Courts and Diversity on the Bench. We’re excited to invite you to our launch of a new, sustained project in collaboration with Justice at Stake, local, state and national organizations on October 17. Tim Hogan (Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest), Liz Fujii (Justice at Stake) and Eric Lesh (Lambda Legal) will each speak briefly on court cases that impact our lives, equality and justice. Guests are encouraged to make this a discussion with our three panelists. We have lots of food and drink and the social is free. You just need to reserve your place with rooftop access at the Clarendon limited to 100 guests.

“Americans are engaged in an important and vigorous debate over the best way to stem gun violence, but the heated argument begs the question: What do the numbers show? Stanford Law School Professor John Donohue III, one of the world’s leading empirical legal researchers, will give a public lecture on the subject at The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.”

  • State Bar CLE: “The Arizona Justice Project: Volunteer Lawyers on the Long Hard Road to Justice.” Friday, Oct. 18, 9 a.m. Available live, Tucson simulcast or as a webcast. Here is the detail:

AZ justice-project logo“This session will showcase the work of the Arizona Justice Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to examining claims of innocence and manifest injustice, and providing legal representation for inmates believed to have been failed by the criminal justice system. The seminar will include a discussion of current advancements in forensic science as well as an overview of post-conviction relief procedures. A primary focus of the program will be to highlight the importance of and opportunities for pro bono service. Faculty will discuss actual cases involving the work of the Project to include the Drayton Witt, Bill Macumber and Louis Taylor cases.

Here’s hoping we get to meet at one or more of these events.