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Some leadership news from the Arizona Justice Project:

Kathleen Brody is the new Executive Director of the Arizona Justice Project as of Jan. 4, 2016.

Kathleen Brody

The Phoenix law firm Osborn Maledon and the nonprofit Arizona Justice Project announced last week that Kathleen Brody, an Osborn Maledon partner, will serve as the executive director of the Project, effective Jan. 4, 2016. Brody also will continue her practice as part of Osborn Maledon’s Investigations and Criminal Defense group, where she focuses on criminal defense, government and internal investigations, and professional discipline proceedings.

The Arizona Justice Project’s current executive director, Katie Puzauskas, will continue to head the Post-Conviction Clinic at the Arizona State University College of Law. She will focus on some of the most difficult cases in the criminal-justice system.

The Arizona Justice Project, established in 1998, seeks to assure that Arizona’s prisons are not housing innocent individuals or those who have suffered manifest injustice through the criminal-justice system. In recent years, the Project has secured the release of 24 individuals, involving cases of wrongful conviction or manifest injustice. The Project has scores of cases under review or in post-conviction court proceedings.

For the last year, Brody has served as the president of the Arizona Attorneys for Criminal Justice (AACJ), a statewide not-for-profit organization of criminal-defense lawyers, law students and associated professionals dedicated to protecting the rights of the criminally accused and promoting excellence in the practice of criminal law. Brody’s work as president of AACJ has focused on increasing the organization’s visibility among legislators, other policy- and decision-makers, and the broader Arizona community. As executive director of the Arizona Justice Project, she will continue to work on community outreach and policy-reform efforts related to wrongful convictions and fairness in the criminal-justice process, in addition to overseeing all the work of the Project and ensuring its long-term sustainability.

Katie Puzauskas

Katie Puzauskas

“We are excited about the increased focus that having both Kathy and Katie working in these key roles will bring to the Arizona Justice Project,” said Larry Hammond, an Osborn Maledon partner and founder of the Arizona Justice Project. “As the Justice Project works to assure that individuals are treated fairly by the system, we also continue to identify many difficult systemic issues. Among those are increased life sentences for juvenile offenders and the lessening impact of the Arizona Clemency Board’s recommendations with Arizona governors.”

“It’s amazingly great timing that, as Katie wanted to spend more time working with cases, Kathy was eager to take on this new leadership role.”

Before joining Osborn Maledon in 2008, Brody clerked for Justice Andrew D. Hurwitz of the Arizona Supreme Court. She is a member of the Committee on the Rules of Professional Conduct of the State Bar of Arizona and has served as the web editor for the American Bar Association’s Litigation Section, Criminal Litigation Committee. She is also a member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.

Brody also distinguished herself as a summa cum laude graduate of the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.

Osborn Maledon P.A. is a 50-attorney leading Arizona law firm that provides litigation, business, and general counsel solutions for its clients.  More information is available here.

http://www.omlaw.com/

I just flew in from New York, and boy, are my arms … cold.

As I reported last week, I was attending a conference on criminal justice. It was terrific, but more on that later.

The unfortunate part of my trip was that it caused me to miss a potentially significant criminal justice event right here in Arizona.

On Tuesday, February 1, the Arizona Attorneys for Criminal Justice held a press conference to roll out its new report on criminal sentencing reform.

The New York conference I attended earlier this week touched on that topic quite a bit, and we will have an article on sentencing in Arizona Attorney Magazine in the coming months. There, we’ll also look at the AACJ’s proposals in more detail, as well as responses from many in the system.

Calls for change are perennial (even in Arizona). But what may make 2011 different is a budget crisis that is dire. Nationwide, statehouses are confronted by an array of awful choices. Decisions that reduce the corrections line item may begin to look attractive.

Arizona may be different. I’ve spoken to more than one state leader who says that the economic situation will have to be far, far worse before state legislators would consider reducing prison sentence lengths or aggravating circumstances that lead to (more expensive) prison time.

But a new movement of conservatives who seek sentencing reform may be the elephant’s nose under the tent. The Right on Crime project urges changes that will save states many resources. Will it have an effect here? We’ll examine that in our story.

You can read more about the AACJ report (and read the report itself) here

Want to read more about the Right on Crime movement? Click here.

And here is an Arizona Republic story on Tuesday’s presser on the Legislature’s lawn.