Legal events


An adult Gerald Gault and his attorney Amelia Lewis.

An adult Gerald Gault and his attorney Amelia Lewis.

The 50th anniversary of the landmark decision In Re Gault will be the focus of a May 15 event in Phoenix, sponsored by ALWAYS—Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services. The evening next Monday will include a reception and dramatic performance by Rising Youth Theatre.

Gault is the U.S. Supreme Court decision based on an Arizona case that ensured the right to a lawyer for children accused of crimes in juvenile court. More specifically, it held that “juveniles accused of crimes in a delinquency proceeding must be afforded many of the same due process rights as adults, such as the right to timely notification of the charges, the right to confront witnesses, the right against self-incrimination, and the right to counsel.”

ALWAYS logo Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services

That evening, ALWAYS also will “honor the leadership behind the Youth Collaborative in Maricopa County with the 2017 Youth and Justice Award.”

  • When: Monday, May 15, 2017
  • Time: 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
  • Where: University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix Campus

Rising Youth Theatre logoAddress (see map below):

Virginia Piper Auditorium, 600 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ 85004

Free tickets are available here.

In Arizona Attorney Magazine, we covered the Gault anniversary in our May issue. Start reading here.

Here is an article by Judge Peter Cahill and Sarah Edwards.

Here is an article by Judge Jay Blitzman.

Gault order by Justice Lorna Lockwood for habeas hearing

Gault order by Justice Lorna Lockwood for habeas hearing (click to enlarge)

And here is more information about ALWAYS:

Arizona Legal Women and Youth Services is a nonprofit law office committed to opening the doors of justice for youth and young adults who have experienced homelessness, human trafficking, abuse, or the foster care system. We are attorneys, advocates, and volunteers working together to eliminate legal barriers to success and stability for vulnerable young people in Arizona. We believe every person deserves full access to the justice system, and we work every day to make this a reality for vulnerable youth in Arizona. We provide no-cost legal services to support the safety, stability, and self-sufficiency of our clients. ALWAYS services include full representation, consultations and brief advice, training, and system reform advocacy.

Map to the event:

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28 attorneys as well as multiple other volunteers assisted at Legal Clinics on Law Day, held in Arizona on April 29, 2017.

28 attorneys as well as multiple other volunteers assisted at Legal Clinics on Law Day, held in Arizona on April 29, 2017.

News from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez, Public Information and Community Outreach, at the State Bar of Arizona:

On Saturday, April 29, the State Bar of Arizona held the 2017 Law Day Legal Aid Clinics where 28 volunteer lawyers offered free one-on-one legal consultations from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at two Valley locations.

Volunteer attorneys provided 214 consultations during five-hour law clinic to the 205 consumers who were seen. Several attorneys offered free follow-up services after the clinic to consumers who needed additional help.

State Bar of Arizona logoThe clinics offered free legal consultations by members who practice family law, bankruptcy/foreclosure, probate/trust law, and immigration law at State Bar of Arizona offices in central Phoenix, and Glendale Community College in the west valley.

For the third year in a row, the Bar partnered with ABC15 and Univision Arizona to promote the day-long clinics, which were overwhelmingly successful.

The State Bar of Arizona expresses its sincerest appreciation to our attorney and logistics volunteers, along with our media and community partners. Thank you!

Here is a list of the attorneys who assisted:

  • Taylor Anderson, Anderson and Cabrera Law Group PLLC
  • Marysol Angulo, Hernandez Global
  • Rebecca E. Browning, Browning Law Office PLLC
  • Tabitha Cabrera, Anderson and Cabrera Law Group PLLC
  • Craig Cherney, Canterbury Law Group LLP
  • Kristen DeWitt-Lopez, DeWitt-Lopez Law PC
  • Thomas W. Dorsey, The Law Office of Thomas W. Dorsey PLLC
  • Nina J. Edidin, My Az Lawyers
  • Pam Florian, Florence Project
  • Chris D. Graham, Christopher D. Graham PLLC
  • Cody L. Hayes, Hayes Esquire PLLC
  • Brant Hodyno, Brant Hodyno, Esq.
  • Bernard J. Johnsen, Bernard Justice Johnsen Law PLLC
  • Lisa Johnson Stone, Law Offices of Stone and Davis PC
  • Jeff Katz, Community Legal Services
  • Roman A. Kostenko, Law Office of Roman A. Kostenko PLC
  • Richard Lee, Community Legal Services
  • Jack L. O’Connor III, Curry, Pearson & Wooten PLC
  • Alane M. Ortega, Law Office of Alane M. Ortega PLLC
  • Daniel R. Ortega III, The Law Office of Daniel R. Ortega III
  • Christopher J. Piekarski, Piekarski & Brelsford PC
  • Jim T. Rayburn, Rayburn Law Office
  • Javier Sobampo, The Sobampo Law Firm PLLC
  • Fae Sowders, Sowders Law
  • Shawn L. Stone, Stone Law Group
  • Shufan Sung, Sung Law Group
  • Darren D. Whiting, Whiting Legal LLC
  • Jesi L. Wolnick, Manning & Kass Ellrod Ramirez Trester

A complete list of volunteers can be viewed here.

 

Today, we talk about parallel citations and what the Arizona Supreme Court says. railroad tracks

Today, we talk about parallel citations and what the Arizona Supreme Court says.

In what may be the most legal blog post I’ve ever published, I share below news from the Arizona Supreme Court regarding a change in its policy regarding parallel citations. This may be good news to those of you who suspended their use quite a while ago. Here is the Court:

The Arizona Supreme Court has determined that as of now it will no longer require any appellate briefs, petitions, and other pleadings filed in that Court to contain parallel citations for Arizona cases. This means that when citing Arizona cases to the Court, lawyers and self-representing parties need only cite to the Arizona Reports alone, without a parallel citation to the Pacific Reports.

AZ Supreme Court logo
While the Arizona Rules of Civil Appellate Procedure has not required any more than citation to the official reports for civil appeals since January 1, 2015, for criminal matters Arizona Rule of Criminal Procedure 31.13(c)(vi) currently requires citation “also when possible to the unofficial reports.” A petition that proposes to restyle the Criminal Rules, specifically proposed new Rule 31.10(g), is expected to be on the Court’s August Rules Agenda. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court will no longer expect parallel citations in criminal case filings.

Citations for specific points of law within a case still must include “the volume, page number and, if applicable, the paragraph number, of the official Arizona reporter.” See Arizona Rule of Civil Appellate Procedure 13(f).

Corporatization of the Criminal Justice System ASU Law School

This Friday, speakers at ASU Law School will offer a seminar titled “Corporatization of the Criminal Justice System.”

According to organizers, the event will include a variety of speakers including scholars, attorneys, and advocates “working on the pressing issue of the role of private prisons in mass incarceration and immigration detention.”

The keynote speaker will be Ben Jealous, former CEO and President of the NAACP.

The event opens at 1:30 p.m. and ends with an 8:45 p.m. reception.

The complete agenda with panel titles is here.

Other organizations involved include Abolish Private Prisons, Changing Hands Bookstore, Osborn Maledon, the American Constitution Society, and the Carolina Academic Press.

Organizers plan to address numerous topics, including the relationship between private prisons and:

  • the length and severity of sentences and availability of parole
  • mass incarceration’s impact on communities of color

Speakers at the event will examine prisons, parole, immigration detention, bail, and probation.

The complete conference website is here.

The website for the speaker information is here.

Abogados a Su Lado on immigration 03-01-17

Attorneys assist at Abogados a Su Lado phone bank, March 1, 2017.

News from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez:

The State Bar of Arizona and Univision Arizona hosted the first Abogados a Su Lado (attorneys on your side) phone bank of the year on Wednesday, March 1, 2017. This access to justice program was held to help the immigrant community understand the impact of the President’s Executive Orders.

The Bar’s role as a partner and organizer of the phone bank was to help the immigrant community connect with licensed attorneys for sound legal advice. The immigrant community is often victimized by notarios and document preparers during high-profile activity associated with immigration law.

The phone bank on immigration law was held on Wednesday, March 1, from 5:00 to 10:30 p.m.

sba_logo_color State Bar of ArizonaThere were nine volunteer attorneys:

  • Marisol Angulo, Hernandez Global
  • Emilia Banuelos, Banuelos Law Office
  • Vanessa Black, Vanessa Black Law Immigration Law Firm
  • Joshua De La Ossa, De La Ossa & Ramos
  • Seth B. Draper, Salvatierra Law Group
  • Judy Flanagan, Judy C. Flanagan, PC
  • Ayensa Millan, CIMA Law Group
  • Edwin G. Ramos, De La Ossa & Ramos
  • Javier Sobampo, Sobampo Law Firm

Volunteer attorneys answered 381 calls regarding immigrant rights and changes in immigration law during the five-and-a-half-hour phone bank.

We thank the attorneys as well as Univision Arizona for its continued partnership in providing this valuable program for the Spanish-speaking community. We also thank the volunteers from Mi Familia Vota who helped with event logistics.

State Bar of Arizona logo

The worst award is the one that goes ungiven, and with that in mind, you should consider who in your circle may deserve to be honored with an award by the State Bar.

Nominations for the 2017 awards are now being accepted through March 22, 2017 at 5 p.m. That’s tomorrow. Giddyup.

You can read a list of the awards here. That page also includes detail on the day they will be presented, a description of each and a list of previous recipients by year.

New this year is a State Bar of Arizona Award Nomination form, click here. Use that form for each nomination, along with any supporting nominations.

Here are photos of the three attorneys who were honored in 2016 as Members of the Year.

Daily 5 logo.jpg

Since November 1, the Arizona Attorney Magazine staff have been writing a new newsletter for a new generation of newsletter readers. Sent by email every afternoon, the Daily 5 offers 4 news stories + 1 case of the day.

You can get through that content in about 5 minutes–10 if you’re really enjoying yourself.

I wrote about the Daily 5 in my February editor’s column, which I share again today:

You probably think you’re reading a magazine right now. And of course you’re right. But that’s only part of the picture. Because what you’re truly reading is a concept, an idea with personality, that has formed over decades. Arizona Attorney is a magazine, but it’s also a way of thinking and—dare I say it—a brand.

A brand that grew a little bit this fall.

Over the past 18 months, we decided to take that voice—that brand—into another channel. You may already be familiar with what we do in social media (for example, on Twitter @azatty, yo). But we wondered: How could that approach to the legal world play out in a daily newsletter?

So in November, after laying a year’s worth of groundwork, we launched the Arizona Attorney Daily 5.

5 news headlines a day, snappy writing, great design, all emailed once a day to readers. How hard can that be?

Daily 5 praise on FB cropped.jpg

When a Facebook message makes an Editor’s day.

 

Pretty hard, it turns out. But where the Daily 5 has succeeded, it has done so for a few reasons. Let me offer, well, 5 of them.

Voice matters: Arizona Attorney may be a legal publication, but we’re no law journal. We believe that in the life of every practicing attorney there’s room for humor and a lighter outlook. The Daily 5 is your informative colleague at the 5-minute water-cooler break.

Story choice matters: Yes, we offer substantive summaries of court opinions. But we think you enjoy some articles that require lighter lifting, too. Cue the Kardashians’ legal struggles.

Writing matters: Even if our choices are solid, readers will flee if the writing comes from the 19th century. Our tone and approach show we are not your grandfather’s newsletter.

Knowing your audience matters: We’ve spent decades-plus interacting with Arizona lawyers. Since November, we’ve heard from a large number of readers who appreciate our lighter touch and our lively writing. Is everyone a fan? No, but we do what we can to win them over.

Colleagues matter: Each Daily 5 contains about 500 words, 600 max. But that sparseness masks the input of so many people. From having the newsletter’s title contest-crowdsourced among State Bar staff, to an elegant logo designed by our Art Director, to all the writing and curating done in-house, to the ad sales that make the newsletter smart and profitable, this is a capital-T Team effort. Kudos to everyone involved.

We do enjoy hearing your thoughts about our daily work. Send praise, critiques and suggestions to us at Daily5@azbar.org. And yes, we’ll write back.

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