Convention


Marian Yim (far right) was one of the honorees to receive the national Trailblazers Award at the annual NAPABA Convention, November 2014.

Marian Yim (far right) was one of the honorees to receive the national Trailblazers Award at the annual NAPABA Convention, November 2014.

Last month, Arizona was privileged to host a national conference of lawyers and law students. The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) event featured quite a few excellent seminars and plenary sessions—plus a Mercedes raffle. (I mentioned one of its signature events here.)

Among the things NAPABA gets right is the use of video to draw people in. They were effective at marketing the conference in advance and as tools to tell stories from the event once it was done.

Attorney Jared Leung, President of the Arizona Asian American Bar Association, kindly shared three of those videos. I pass them on with the hope that other event organizers will take their lead. (All videos are courtesy of Ty Ng of TwinTygr Films.)

The first video offered a broad overview of all the conference’s highlights:

The next video demonstrated the group’s community-service efforts benefiting Packages From Home and the veterans it serves. As Jared said:

NAPABA_logo“Barry Wong was instrumental in setting this wonderful community project at the NAPABA Convention.  It would not have happened without his leadership on this. Also, over 25 of you woke up early on Sunday morning, arriving at the Convention at 7 am to help set up the ‘production lines’ for the convention participants to pack the boxes. We had planned 2 hours to pack 300 boxes, but we ended up using a little over an hour and packed 315 boxes. The support and excitement was overwhelming and far exceeded our expectation. Your support was crucial to the success of this event. Thank you all so much!!

Here’s the video:

OK, best for last. Finally, Jared shared a video of the speech given by Marian Yim as she accepted the national Trailblazer Award. And Jared reminded attendees, “Marian gave us a challenge at the end of her speech: What kind of new APA lawyer are you going to be?”

I think that question could be asked of all attorneys. Here is the video of Marian:

Members of the Arizona Asian American Bar Association gather at the annual NAPABA Convention, Nov. 2014.

Members of the Arizona Asian American Bar Association gather at the annual NAPABA Convention, Nov. 2014.

The 3rd annual ASU-Arkfeld eDiscovery Conference will be on March 12-14, 2015. Get your proposed papers in now.

In the event you have a great eDiscovery treatise banging around in your head (or your desk drawer), here is the opportunity for you.

A respected conference focused on eDiscovery and digital evidence is seeking papers on the topic. They are due by December 2, though, so sharpen your (digital) pencils.

Here is more from conference organizers:

“The Conference welcomes papers that fit within our 2015 theme: ‘Know the Law, Know the Technology.’ Papers might address law, technology, or the intersection of the two. All papers submitted will be fully refereed by a minimum of two specialized referees.”

“Only accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Best papers awards will be distributed during the conference, authors will be given an opportunity to briefly present their papers, and selected papers may be published in Law Technology News.”

“Authors whose papers are accepted will be entitled to complimentary registration for the conference. Papers must comply with the guidelines set forth in the attached announcement. The length of the articles will be 800-1000 words.”

The eDiscovery paper brochure is here. Click for more information.

More detail about the conference itself, to be held March 12-14, 2015, is here.

Among the speakers at this week's NAPABA Convention in Scottsdale will be journalist and filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas

Among the speakers at this week’s NAPABA Convention in Scottsdale will be journalist and filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas

In the November Arizona Attorney Magazine, I shared news about the upcoming convention of NAPABA—the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association. As I mentioned, we’re fortunate that the annual event is being held in Arizona.

The convention will be held this week, November 6 to 9 at the Westin Kierland Resort & Spa in Scottsdale. The keynote speaker on Saturday will be Jose Antonio Vargas, “a journalist, filmmaker, and the founder of Define American, a campaign that seeks to elevate the immigration conversation.” AAABA President Jared Leung says, “Mr. Vargas will share his amazing journey from the Philippines to the U.S., who will inspire and perhaps even challenge our thinking of the current immigration debate and the definition of Americans.”

More information and registration are here.

Meanwhile, I also alert you to a Convention-related event. But note its location!

The free event is titled “Civil Liberties vs. National Security: Policy and Reality of Judicial Review.” (Note: Aside from this free lecture, there are registration fees for the rest of the convention.)

This lecture will not be held at the Convention site. Instead, this compelling presentation will be at the ASU Cronkite journalism school in downtown Phoenix (555 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ, 85004). The presentation will be on November 6, from 8:00 to 9:30 am.

Shayana Kadidal, Senior Managing Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights

Shayana Kadidal, Senior Managing Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights

The speaker is Shayana Kadidal, Senior Managing Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York.

Here is more background from the organizers:

“We are told that the history of civil liberties involves a constant tug of war between two irreconcilable demands: collective security vs. individual rights. Following 9/11, almost all discussions of the excesses of the federal government—detention without charge, torture, and mass surveillance—start from the premise that safety and liberty are in conflict with each other, and must always be ‘balanced’; if we insist on rigorously enforcing Constitutional rights for all, we must also accept becoming marginally less safe. But does eliminating the right of judicial review of detentions, or the right to privacy against government surveillance, really make us safer? Join us for a wide-ranging discussion of these issues with attorney Shayana Kadidal, managing attorney of the Center for Constitutional Rights’ Guantanamo project.

Center for Constitutional Rights CCR logo“Shayana Kadidal is senior managing attorney of the Guantánamo Global Justice Initiative at the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York City. He is a 1994 graduate of Yale Law School and a former law clerk to Judge Kermit Lipez of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. In his twelve years at the Center, he has worked on a number of significant cases arising in the wake of 9/11, including the Center’s challenges to the detention of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay (among them torture victim Mohammed al Qahtani and former CIA ghost detainee Majid Khan), which have twice reached the Supreme Court, and several cases arising out of the post-9/11 domestic immigration sweeps.

“He was also counsel in CCR’s legal challenges to the ‘material support’ statute (Holder v. Humanitarian Law Project, decided by the Supreme Court in 2010), to the low rates of black firefighter hiring in New York City, and to the NSA’s warrantless surveillance program. Along with others at the Center, he currently serves as U.S. counsel to WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange. On behalf of plaintiffs including Assange, Glenn Greenwald, and other journalists, he led litigation that ultimately resulted in public release of over 550 previously withheld documents during the court-martial of Pvt. Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning.”

NAPABA_logoIn the upcoming Arizona Attorney Magazine, I talk about a national legal event coming to our state—the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association convention. More to come soon.

But in the meantime, convention organizers are putting together an event that helps military personnel. Your help may be needed—and you need not be a convention registrant to step up.

Attorney Jared Leung is President of AAABA, the Arizona affiliate. And he has issued a call for help. When are you needed? Sunday, Nov. 9, from 7 am to noon.

What’s happening? NAPABA is donating money and volunteer hours to assist Phoenix-based “Packages from Home.” Attendees will assemble 300 care boxes of comfort foods for military men and women stationed overseas.

As Jared says:

“The Project is absolutely wonderful, as we are packing food boxes for military men and women based overseas. These boxes must be packed in a certain way and inspected carefully because of security and shipping reasons. You will receive training on-site and assist others volunteers, who are attendees of the Convention from all over the country. You do not need to have registered for the NAPABA Convention to volunteer in this event, and we encourage you to bring a friend, family member, or significant other to come as well.”

See the flyer below for more information.

For more information or to RSVP to lend your assistance, contact Jared at jleung@fclaw.com.

More detail about the Convention is here.

AAABA Packages From Home event

Whitney Cunningham, Richard Platt, John Phelps

Whitney Cunningham, Richard Platt, John Phelps

Was it only a week ago that I was at the State Bar Convention, and where I (unwisely?) launched a photo-caption contest?

No matter about my poor judgment: I promised to announce the winner today—Change of Venue Friday—and so I shall.

You can see the photo at the top of this post. As a reminder, this captures what has become an annual tradition as the Bar’s leadership changes. The photo includes the departing President, the incoming President, and the Bar’s CEO/ED. The train is leaving the station, you could say.

Here is the winning entry:

“Is there a choreographer in the house? Please tell me this doesn’t involve twerking.”

As I said in my initial post, the winner receives a Starbucks gift card. As if those in the legal profession need to be caffeinated any more.

I am obliged to disappoint interested readers, though, by saying that the winner must remain anonymous. Due to his or her workplace situation, she or he prefers it that way, and I acquiesce to that request.

I can assure you, though, that the winner is not a State Bar employee, me, or any member of my family.

Besides that, read my original blog post to see where you should file your complaints.

Have a wonderful—and caption-filled—weekend.

(Note: Some may wonder why I included the word “twerking” in the post title. Honestly, I’m simply curious what unique Twitter interactions that may create. We’ll see!)

Next week: A few brief follow-ups to some noteworthy Convention events. (And then we’ll be Convention-free until 2015!)

Westin 3 Westin La Paloma Resort in TucsonHere is the last in a series of posts that lets Convention seminar chairs speak for themselves. In advance of the Bar Convention, I contacted seminar chairs seeking their response to four questions about their upcoming panel. Here are the questions I sent:

  • Who should attend this seminar?
  • What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?
  • How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)
  • What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Today, I share the responses of those whose seminars are calendared for this afternoon, Friday, June 13. (Note: Not all seminar chairs responded.) Click on the seminar title to read more detail as published in the Convention brochure.

Friday, June 13, 2:00 pm

F-38: Mr. Smith Goes to Tucson

Co-chair: Alan Baskin

Who should attend this seminar?

Alan Baskin

Alan Baskin

Anyone who is interested in business, securities law, current events, and/or the impact and application of or potential changes to the JOBS Act.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

Attendees will hear from Congressman David Schweikert, one of the primary authors of the JOBS Act.  What better way to learn?

Is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

Yes.  The seminar involves the practical application of recent and important legislation. A fabulous opportunity to see if the Act has turned out as expected, learn of any unexpected pitfalls, and hear about what changes may be coming.

Friday, June 13, 2:00 pm

F-40: Embracing the Future of Construction

Chair: Rick Erickson

Who should attend this seminar?

Attorneys interested in construction design, financing, planning, development, administration and project delivery should attend this seminar.  In addition, attorneys should attend if they have an interest in construction industry claims, including litigation of lien disputes, breach of contract, design and construction defects, project delays and licensing complaints against contractors.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

Rick Erickson

Rick Erickson

Lawyers will better understand how builders and developers achieve success in Arizona and how they rely on their attorneys to succeed.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

The seminar will focus on some of the most recognized projects in Arizona, including Intel Fab 42 in Chandler, University of Arizona Behavioral Sciences in Phoenix, Beal Derkenne’s student towers at UofA and ASU, Caliente’s work on Chase Field and numerous other buildings and Baker Concrete’s role in major projects for Target and other private developers.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

The most common misconception is that lawyers think they know what construction clients really want.  This seminar offers an opportunity to learn how to avoid giving construction clients what they don’t want.

 

2014 State Bar of Arizona Convention brochure cover hires_optHere is another post that lets Convention seminar chairs speak for themselves. In advance of the Bar Convention, I contacted seminar chairs seeking their response to four questions about their upcoming panel. Here are the questions I sent:

  • Who should attend this seminar?
  • What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?
  • How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)
  • What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Today, I share the responses of those whose seminars are calendared for tomorrow morning, Friday, June 13. (Note: Not all seminar chairs responded.) Click on the seminar title to read more detail as published in the Convention brochure.

A final post will share the responses from the Friday afternoon chairs.

Friday, June 13, 8:45 am

F-33: Criminal Risks in Real Estate Deals

Chair: James A. Craft, Apogee Physicians

Who should attend this seminar?

James Craft

James Craft

Criminal defense counsel, real estate transactions counsel and antitrust counsel.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

In real estate deals and financing, what practices are being targeted today by state and federal prosecutors?

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

In Arizona, real estate scams have a colorful history. The 2008 crash created new enforcement priorities.  And buyer collusion in foreclosure and tax auctions became a national problem, according to recent DOJ prosecutions – including a jury trial recently in Sacrmento.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

“Joint ventures” to purchase real estate at a private or public auction are in some situations bid-rigging, which is a felony.

Friday, June 13, 8:45 am

F-34: ENRLS offers two seminars on Friday morning at the State Bar Conference. The first seminar, titled “Environmental Law: Where we are,”  will feature a panel of experienced environmental attorneys who will be discussing developments in the law for air quality, hazardous waste cleanups, water quality and NEPA.

Chair: Sonia Overholser, Department of the Interior, Phoenix Solicitor’s Office

Who should attend?

We tailor this seminar for attorneys and consultants who work in the area of air or water quality compliance, who have some responsibility for hazardous waste clean ups, or who advise or implement the NEPA process, but this seminar is also suitable for any attorneys or consultants who want to stay current in these areas for any reason.

What is the main takeaway?

Sonia Overholser

Sonia Overholser

Attorneys or consultants who attend this seminar will walk away knowing the very latest developments in each of these areas.

How is it timely?

Air and water quality, hazardous waste clean ups, and NEPA are complex legal areas that are constantly evolving and developing.  For this reason, we discuss the top developments in the last year so we can focus on the cutting edge of the law in each area.

What are some common misconceptions?

I believe it is a misconception to believe that environmental law has not changed from the way it was taught in law schools, if it was taught in law school.  In American legal jurisprudence, environmental law remains relatively young and it has evolved and developed to keep pace with developments in manufacturing and industrial processes, energy generation, land use planning, and scientific improvements for sustaining clean land, air, and water hand in hand with economic development.

Friday, June 13, 10:30 am

F-35: The second seminar offered by ENRLS on Friday morning is titled “Environmental Law: Where are we going?”

Chair: Sonia Overholser, Department of the Interior, Phoenix Solicitor’s Office

Who should attend?

In addition to attorneys or consultants who work in the area of solid or hazardous waste, air or water quality, or NEPA, this seminar would appeal to attorneys or consultants who have an interest in getting a glimpse at where the law might be headed in these areas.  This would be critical to any attorney or consultant working with clients who might be encountering any of these areas in the future.

What is the main takeaway?

No one can predict the future, but in this panel we have assembled top attorneys from private practice and the federal and state regulatory areas, as well as an environmental consultant, to share their observations about the major future trends in environmental law.

How is it timely?

Drought; an increasing awareness of climate change; the promises of energy independence; and technological developments transforming the work place are all recent trends that implicate environmental law and create questions about how the law will develop and evolve.

What are some common misconceptions?

I believe that many miss the connection between environmental law and many of the major social and economic trends that have dominated the last decade.  It may be easy to spot the relationship between energy generation and environmental law, but there are multiple other connections that may not be perceived as readily.  Environmental law remains a critical component for anyone who anticipates playing a role in the major trends of these times.

Friday, June 13, 8:45 am

F-36: Evidence Law Update

Co-chair: Hon. Sam Thumma

Who should attend?

Our program is on evidence and the target audience is litigators of all kind and other lawyers who have matters that may end up in litigation.

What is the main takeaway?

Hon. Sam Thumma

Hon. Sam Thumma

The take away will be an overview of recent significant evidence cases and rules changes, as well as a more detailed discussion of selected areas of evidence law, and how to handle application of the Arizona Rules of Evidence to facts through a few dozen hypotheticals with responders, tabulated electronically and discussed with model answers.

How is the program timely?

The program is timely on that it will discuss up to date evidence developments for use in evidentiary hearings of all types.

What are some common misperceptions?

There are many misconceptions about the law of evidence.  Ones we will address include privilege issues, expert testimony and the hearsay rule and its exceptions.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-44: Lessons From Employment Law

Co-chair: Joe Kroeger

Who should attend this seminar?

Joe Kroeger

Joe Kroeger

This seminar is for the attorney engaged in the practice of labor and employment law.  Whether you represent employees or employers, are in private practice, work for the government, or serve as an in-house attorney, the program will provide updates and offer information that is immediately relevant to your labor and employment practice.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

This year, attendees will walk away with an improved understanding of the key emerging trends impacting their practice – including new initiatives impacting both union and non-union employers at the National Labor Relations Board, current employment issues impacting the sports world, workplace privacy and data security in the digital age, the continued move towards arbitration and evaluating the pros and cons of arbitration in the workplace, and the top five lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues facing employment lawyers.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

The program centers on several of the most relevant trends and issues facing the practice today. The panelists will focus on the future of our practice in the ever-shifting labor and employment landscape and also evaluate the lessons we have learned from the past.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Many attorneys, and certainly their clients, continue to operate under the misperception that the National Labor Relations Act only applies to unions and unionized companies.  Increasingly, the NLRB and the courts are applying the NLRB to non-unionized workforces in ever expanding ways.  This seminar will help to educate practitioners as to this developing area, as well as the rapidly developing areas of privacy and data protection and LBGT issues.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-45: Juvenile Law in the Digital Age

Co-chair: Gaylene Morgan

Who should attend this seminar?

  • Anyone interested in juvenile law, using technology in the practice of law, or bullying.
  • Of particular interest to:
  • Attorneys representing children and parents in dependency actions
  • Guardians Ad Litem for children
  • Assistant Attorneys General representing CPS
  • Attorneys representing juveniles or the State in delinquency actions
  • Family Law or other attorneys wanting to know more about juvenile law

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

CURRENT information regarding juvenile law practice:

  • Appellate and Legislative Updates (Update on proposed 2014 Special Session legislation creating a new child welfare agency)
  • Using technology in the practice of juvenile law
  • What’s being done about bullying?  What do kids think about bullying—from the teen panel.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

  • The digital age is changing the way that lawyers practice and  the JLS seminar will provide up-to-date information critical to
  • Lawyers to keep pace with the changes. The legislative update will include information on the 2014 Legislative Special Session
  • The creation of a new stand-alone child welfare agency

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

That the Juvenile Law Section seminar is only of interest to those practicing in the juvenile law area.  Information on technology in the practice of law is of interest and can benefit any lawyer and the bullying topic should be of interest to all.  Hearing from teens about the bullying going on over social media and what they think of it is information not readily available.  The youth panel is always captivating and thought-provoking.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-47: Family Law and the Brain, 9:45 am session

Responded: Robert Barrasso

Who should attend?

Anyone interested in family law should attend this seminar.

What is the one main takeaway?

Robert Barrasso

Robert Barrasso

The one main take away would be how modern brain science information can help the family law practitioner.

Why is this seminar timely?

This seminar is timely because we are going to be hearing an actual court of appeals legal argument on a complicated property issue that will result in new case law. It is also timely because we will be hearing from three different University of Arizona professors about the leading research in brain science.

What is the most common misperception?

The most common misconception is that brain science has nothing to do with family law.

Friday, June 13, all day

F-47: Family Law and the Brain, 2:00 pm session

Responses by: Patricia Green

Who should attend this seminar?

Any attorney practicing or interested in practicing family law, and who desires to increase their knowledge of the various topics identified in the brochure.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

This seminar will present a rare opportunity to see the Court of Appeals in action – live oral argument on a current family law case – while also giving seminar attendees an opportunity to identify how they would rule on the case.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Two sessions of the seminar will focus on the brain and have presentations from non-lawyers.  These sessions, in particular, are intended to assist attorneys in better understanding brain function for clients, witnesses and judges.

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