Earlier this month, women lawyers and law students filed an amicus brief that told the story of their own abortions and the value that reproductive rights played in their careers.

Earlier this month, women lawyers and law students filed an amicus brief that told the story of their own abortions and the value that reproductive rights played in their careers.

The legal battle over reproductive rights continues to be much in the news. And the heat got turned up this week when Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit over an antiabortion ‘sting’ video-maker. As the Washington Post reports:

“Planned Parenthood filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against the maker of a series of undercover videos released last year that sought to prove that the women’s health organization illegally profits by selling tissue from aborted fetuses.”

You can read about the allegations here.

But that reminded me, in an in-case-you-missed-it spirit, that a remarkable brief was filed at the U.S. Supreme Court in early January. As reported in the National Law Journal:

“More than 100 female lawyers joined in a brief to tell the U.S. Supreme Court about their own abortion experiences and why their reproductive freedom was pivotal to their personal and professional lives.”

“The extraordinary brief, filed last week, was signed by former judges, law professors, law firm partners, public interest lawyers and law clerks, though none who clerked for the high court itself.”

A Texas case may be "the most important Supreme Court battle over abortion in a generation."

A Texas case may be “the most important Supreme Court battle over abortion in a generation.”

The case, Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole, comes out of Texas, which enacted restrictions on abortion clinics “that could result in shuttering many facilities. [Abortion advocates] claim the regulations pose an ‘undue burden’ on women’s rights.”

Read the whole story (and the brief) here.

Wherever you stand on the question of abortion, this advocacy and the attempt to persuade the Justices are noteworthy. As the story says, attorney Janice Mac Avoy is an attorney who volunteered to tell her own story and to be a lead party on the brief. She pointed out that the drafting in the brief “responds to ‘storytelling briefs,’ often filed on the other side, that relate the stories of women who have regretted their abortions.”

Legal history is filled with examples of parties adopting the strategies of opponents. Time will tell whether this amicus brief, and the many others filed, are ultimately persuasive. “Set for argument on March 2, the case is viewed as the most important abortion rights case in nearly a decade.”

Have a terrific—and persuasive—weekend.

Opponents and supporters of Planned Parenthood demonstrate Tuesday, July 28, 2015, in Philadelphia. Anti-abortion activists are calling for an end to government funding for the nonprofit reproductive services organization. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Opponents and supporters of Planned Parenthood demonstrate Tuesday, July 28, 2015, in Philadelphia. Anti-abortion activists are calling for an end to government funding for the nonprofit reproductive services organization. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)