You know the law ... but how's your practice know-how?

You know the law … but how’s your practice know-how?

Last month, I heard from a lawyer and law professor. He had written an article for publication on the blog of the Washington State Bar Association, and he wondered if I was interested in publishing it too.

I was intrigued—and not just because John Lande and I graduated from the same law school (in different years; we don’t know each other). I was interested because the material could be useful to practicing lawyers.

Let’s begin with the title: Tips For Lawyers Who Want To Get Good Results For Clients And Make Money”

So right off the bat, we see that John knows how to draw readers in.

Here is a little about John:

“At the University of Missouri School of Law, John Lande is the Isidor Loeb Professor Emeritus and former director of the LLM Program in Dispute Resolution. He received his J.D. from Hastings College of Law and Ph.D in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Before coming to MU, he was director of the Mediation Program and assistant professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock School of Law, where he supervised a child protection mediation clinic.”

John Lande

John Lande

You can read his more complete bio here.

Most important for today’s purposes, he contributes to the Indisputably blog of ADR law professors.

In his post, he examines with some detail multiple areas of law practice. An initial glance may suggest to you that you “already know this stuff.” In fact, most lawyers should have some facility with each of John’s topics (I’d hope!). But a more leisurely read reveals nuggets that would serve attorneys well.

Here are the topic areas he discusses:

  • Understand Your Clients’ Interests
  • Pay Attention to What’s Really Important in Your Cases, Not Just the Law or Winning
  • Recognize the Importance of Emotions–Especially Yours
  • Get to Know Your Counterpart Lawyer
  • Make a Habit of Preparing to Resolve Matters at the Earliest Appropriate Time
  • Be Prepared to Negotiate More than You Might Expect
  • Get Help From Mediators When Needed
  • Be Prepared to Advocate Hard and Smart

You can read John’s complete blog post here.

And he welcomes comments and questions; contact him here: landej@missouri.edu