The Historic Arizona State Capitol Building as it was being built at the turn of the 20th Century to today. (Photo illustration by Justin Painter, Arizona Capitol Museum)

The Historic Arizona State Capitol Building as it was being built at the turn of the 20th Century to today. (Photo illustration by Justin Painter, Arizona Capitol Museum)

In April, the Arizona Capitol Museum opened a new exhibit titled “Under the Copper Dome: The Creation and Changes of Arizona’s Capitol.” The displays include photographs and a timeline of the Capitol Complex.

As part of the exhibit, the Museum unveiled unveil “a trio of plaques signed by Gov. Raúl Castro, the Legislature, and other officials that have not been on public display since 1976,” according to the Museum.

Admission and parking at the Museum are free.

You can watch this very short teaser for the new exhibit:

And here is a news story about a Museum exhibit focused on former Gov. Raúl Castro (it opens silently, with no sound):

Be sure to follow the museum on Twitter, where you’ll find multiple video interviews in the “Under the Copper Dome” series.

And here is more information as shared via their press release:

“If the walls of the capitol building could talk, they would tell of a territory grown into a thriving state,” said Sec. of State Michele Reagan. “They also would share the story of the important transformations in Arizona government based on the needs of the state’s citizens.”

Arizona Gov. Raúl Castro

Arizona Gov. Raúl Castro

Arizona’s state government is ever changing and chronicled in the evolution of the Arizona State Capitol Complex. Dedicated in 1900, the capitol building has seen its share of lawmakers and been transformed into the Arizona Capitol Museum (AzCM) where thousands of school children from all over Arizona come to connect with their state government, past and present.

“There is no place more appropriate for people to learn Arizona civics,” said Jason Czerwinski, AzCM Assistant Director, “to learn that their government is still changing and that they can make that change happen. This exhibit will be a launch pad for their exploration of Arizona’s government.”

The Arizona Capitol Museum is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free parking for AzCM guests in Wesley Bolin Plaza at 17th Avenue between Adams and Jefferson Streets. For more information, call 602-926-3620. The AzCM is a branch of the Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records, a division of the Secretary of State.