2014 State Bar of Arizona Convention brochure cover hires_optIn advance of the Bar Convention, I contacted seminar chairs seeking their response to four questions about their upcoming panel. Here are the questions I sent:

  • Who should attend this seminar?
  • What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?
  • How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)
  • What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Today, I share the responses of those whose seminars are calendared for tomorrow, Wednesday, June 11. (Note: Not all seminar chairs responded.) Click on the seminar title to read more detail as published in the Convention brochure.

Wednesday, June 11, 8:45

W-3: Hot Topics in Public Law

Chair: Regina L. Nassen,Deputy Pima County Attorney

The civil law portion

Who should attend this seminar?

Regina_Nassen

Regina Nassen

If you represent government entities, whether you’re privately or publicly employed, you will find this presentation useful. (Public lawyers in offices that do both criminal prosecution and civil government representation will want to attend both sections.)

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

There is a good chance that you will learn something you did not know and probably should, but it may be something different for each person.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

We will highlight issues of particular interest to government lawyers that have been addressed in recently-issued court opinions or new legislation, or are the subject of developing litigation. For example: fees & taxes (Biggs); first amendment rights for gov’t employees (Lane); gift clause restrictions (PLEA); gov’t immunity and tort liability (Glazer, Guerra, Peralta); eminent domain (Rogers, Garretson); claims statute (Ponce); campaign finance (McCutcheon).

The criminal law portion

Who should attend this seminar?

Criminal defense lawyers, prosecutors, and civil government lawyers who represent and advise law enforcement agencies. This seminar is so relevant that even the NSA will eavesdrop.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

When it comes to the 4th and 5th amendments, are the lines now blurred or bright?  How are courts confronting new technologies?  Topics include Katz and dogs, cellphones and cellblocks, border searches and computer seizures, and the latest decisions from the US Supreme Court.  We will talk about new search and questioning tests, effective police tactics and ineffective representation, recording of confessions, restitution to victims, and probable cause determinations.

Wednesday, June 11, 2:00

W-8, Administrative Law: 2014 Statutory and Case Law Update

Chair: Timothy J. Sabo, Roshka DeWulf & Patten, PLC

Faculty: Camila Alarcon, Withey Morris, PLC; Gregory Y. Harris, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

Who should attend the seminar?

Anyone interested in new developments in administrative law, particularly lawyers who appear on behalf of clients in connection with administrative law matters.

What is one main take away a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

Administrative law is dynamic. Legislative changes and judicial decisions that apply or construe the Administrative Procedures Act and the judicial review laws have important implications for practitioners.

How is this seminar timely?

Timothy_Sabo

Timothy Sabo

This seminar will identify and discuss legislation just enacted after the 2014 legislative session and cases decided in the past year.

What is the most common misconception about this issue?

A common misconception is that a single set of laws and rules applies to all agency matters. Municipal agencies, certain personnel matters, and many school boards are not governed by the APA. This seminar will cover recent legislation and case law that highlights this point.

Wednesday, June 11, 2:00

W-9, Appeals of Administrative Decisions

Chair: Timothy J. Sabo, Roshka DeWulf & Patten, PLC

Faculty: Hon. Samuel A. Thumma, Arizona Court of Appeals, Division One; Hon. Michael O. Miller, Arizona Court of Appeals, Division Two; Susan M. Freeman, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

Who should attend this seminar?

Anyone who practices before state, county or local agencies, boards, or commissions.  Unless you win every case and no appeal is taken, eventually you may be faced with an appeal, and anyone with an administrative appeal will benefit from this fast-paced discussion.

What is the one main takeaway a lawyer will gain by attending this seminar?

You will hear directly from two Court of Appeals judges and an experienced appellate practitioner speaking candidly about practical and legal issues for appeals of agency decisions.

How is this seminar timely? (That is: Why do attorneys need to learn more about this topic right now? What’s going on now in the world or in law practice that makes this topic important?)

Electric competition? Problems at BOMEX? Will people with solar panels have to pay more for access to the “grid”?  Some of Arizona’s biggest news stories in the last year have been administrative law issues.  Learn the do’s and don’ts of anticipating and litigating appeals in administrative law cases.

What is the most common misconception about this issue? In other words, what do lawyers think they know, but don’t?

Thinking that you can fix everything when you get to court.  You need to “build the record” before the agency, and learn when and how to “exhaust your remedies” at the agency level.

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