My old Microsoft Office 2007 book (rarely opened, I must admit).

My old Microsoft Office 2007 book (rarely opened, I must admit).

Was it way back in 2010 that I wondered about the utility of a new office telephone?

My concern (not an original idea) was that our cool new technology was outstripping our (my) ability to keep up. After all, 100 new features are merely salt in the wounds for those of us currently not using the 50 new features from the previous iteration.

That thought occurred to me again recently as I sat in seminars explaining the newest (for us) version of the Microsoft Office Suite.

I dutifully tried to grasp the great new features available as we move from Microsoft 2007 (never fully mastered in my simple mind) to MS 2013. Detail about Word, PowerPoint, Outlook and Excel accumulated. (Understanding my serious limitations, I passed on the Excel session.) But did understanding follow?

All the information was helpful, but after a while it simply accumulates in unhelpful masses. It reminds me, oddly, of vacation time. On the beach, the first few mussel shells you encounter are beautiful marvels; by the 1000th shell, the soles of your feet are injured, and you wish you’d gone to the mountains.

So now I have new software—and another beefy textbook to answer my follow-up questions. Here’s hoping an old dog can learn some new tricks.

Do you experience the same in the law office race to keep pace with technology? We recently had an issue dedicated to practice management software. But do you look at all that information, sigh—and continue with your existing technology?

I hear you.

My brand-new Microsoft Office 2013 book. I'm counting on this and the new software rollout to revolutionize my life (or something).

My brand-new Microsoft Office 2013 book. I’m counting on this and the new software rollout to revolutionize my life (or something).