Yale Law School Library Reading RoomOver at the Wall Street Journal Law Blog, reporter Sam Favate asks the question, Are you looking for a law school to fit your politics?

The rather atonal question arises because The Princeton Review has now included among its many categories the odd terms “most liberal” and “most conservative.” You can read Favate’s article here.

I may sound naïve when I suggest that I’m not sure what that means. I know the phrases never were part of my decision-making when I selected a law school back in 1989 or thereabouts.

My “blindness” on that score may rankle some readers, who instead recall law school as a time of struggling through their days as one-sided ideology was crammed down their throats. The law school they suffered was a curricular version of one political platform or another.

Sorry I missed all that. I was too busy thinking that the faculty were hell-bent on their mission to obfuscate what could have been clear. Through the fog, I completely missed the indoctrination. (Except, of course, the pedagogical imperative that we accept as normal and right the status quo—in business, and law, and public policy).

Should prospective law students select schools based on politics? Probably not—but what do I know. I think being around folks who think differently from you may be a good thing.

Recently, I read some commentary about the news sources we all select. No more must we all imbibe from the network nightly news fountain; instead, there are multiple streams from which to drink.

That’s great, but it has a downside. If we shun sources that don’t agree with our worldview, are we just insisting on being a choir that is preached to?

This fall, another media critic pointed out a common phenomenon on Facebook: As “friends” offer views that others find disagreeable or worse, people “unfriend” each other. Pretty soon, our Facebook feeds are cleansed of contrary views—especially in an incendiary presidential election year.

I don’t argue that any of us should have to weather a storm of offense in Facebook—or in law school. But a little diversity of opinion can’t possibly be a bad thing. Can it?