The September issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine includes a short article titled “Civics Lesson.” Written by Supreme Court Justice Scott Bales and Court of Appeals Judge Larry Winthrop, it describes some initiatives that have been launched to honor the state’s centennial, and it urges lawyers to get involved and to donate their experience to the effort.

The article ended with a quiz. Social creatures that we are, I opted to have readers come online to this blog to see the answers.

No cheating—take the quiz before looking at the answers! (The questions and answers are below.) 

Testing Arizona

Think you know your Arizona history? Pretty sure you understand how our state’s legal past stacks up against the national past? Take our 5-minute quiz to discover if you’re a Grand Canyon Guru.

Q1: When was school segregation abolished in Arizona?

A1: In 1953, when the Arizona Superior Court for Maricopa County ruled that segregation in elementary and high schools was unconstitutional.

Q2: When was school segregation determined nationally to be unconstitutional?

A2: In 1954, when the U.S. Supreme Court held in Brown v. Board of Education that school segregation is inherently unequal, and therefore illegal.

Q3: When did women in Arizona win the right to vote?

A3: In 1912, by initiative measure.

Q4: When did women nationally obtain the right to vote?

A4: In 1920, by constitutional amendment.

Q5: When did Native Americans win the right to vote?

A5: In 1948, the Arizona Supreme Court held in Harrison v. Laveen that Native Americans were eligible to vote in Arizona elections.

Q6: Who was the first woman to hold public office in Arizona?

A6: Sharlot Hall, appointed territorial historian in 1909.

Q7: Who was Arizona’s first Congresswoman?

A7: Isabella Greenway, a Representative from 1933-1937.

Q8: Which Arizonan served in the U.S. Congress for 57 years?

A8: Carl Hayden, a Representative from 1912-1927 and a Senator from 1927-1969.

Q9: How many times has the United States Constitution been amended?

A9: 27 times.

Q10: How many times has the Arizona Constitution been amended?

A10: More than 100 times.