Legal events


Gallagher & Kennedy attorney Laura Antonuccio reads to Phoenix Day schoolchildren, May 28, 2014.

Gallagher & Kennedy attorney Laura Antonuccio reads to Phoenix Day schoolchildren, May 28, 2014.

At a school in south Phoenix, dozens of children smile as a group from a law firm enters the room. They’ve come to know these women—each one a woman professional from law firm Gallagher & Kennedy—over the course of many months. And this day—May 28, 2014—is the culmination of the nearly year-long relationship.

If your eyes grow large at the notion that children would be pleased to see attorneys, you really need to understand what these women accomplished at Phoenix Day, an early education and youth development center serving underprivileged children.

The 18 women from Gallagher & Kennedy sought a way to make a difference in their community. The result was their participation in the Million Minutes Reading Challenge of the United Way’s Women’s Leadership Council.

Seeing the need, the G&K folks formed their own “Team Right to Read.” They also sought out a participating school, landing at Phoenix Day. Since last September, the women have volunteered more than 7,300 minutes (and counting) reading to 86 students.

Members of the Gallagher & Kennedy Professional Women’s Group who donated hundreds of books to children at Phoenix Day on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, as part of their role in the Valley of the Sun United Way's Million Minutes Volunteer Reading Challenge. L to R: Jodi Bohr, Jennifer Cranston, Lori Stinson (Phoenix Day), Laura Antonuccio, Meg Smeck, Alana Hake. (Photo: PatrickCorley.com)

Members of the Gallagher & Kennedy Professional Women’s Group who donated hundreds of books to children at Phoenix Day on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, as part of their role in the Valley of the Sun United Way’s Million Minutes Volunteer Reading Challenge. L to R: Jodi Bohr, Jennifer Cranston, Lori Stinson (Phoenix Day), Laura Antonuccio, Meg Smeck, Alana Hake. (Photo: PatrickCorley.com)

May 28 was a reading day like many others. But it also was an opportunity to give the children another present—a large box of books (and other items) for each to take home. The materials had been gathered and assembled over multiple weeks by the G&K women.

As the school’s Education Director Lori Stinson looks on with a smile, attorney Laura Antonuccio leads the kids in a rousing rendition of “Clap Your Hands.”

“Reach for the sky, wiggle your toes, Stick out your tongue and touch your nose.”

Antonuccio originated the idea of a reading support group, and she is adept at firing the children up with the excitement of reading.

She suddenly exclaims, “On the count of three, everybody tell me how old you are!” The joyful cacophony of “3,” “5,” “4” fills the room, while a sotto voce (and slightly Eeyore-ish) voice adds from the back of the room, “30.”

After the festivities, lawyer Jennifer Cranston tells a visitor why the women are committed to this effort.

“Of course, we are all a part of the community,” she begins. And if listeners need a better reason to offer children the gift of reading, she adds, “And we’ll certainly reduce the need for lawyers if the entire population can become better educated.”

(Yes, she meant reducing the need for lawyers is a good thing.)

Members of the Gallagher & Kennedy women’s group may continue their work at Phoenix Day. But the group also seeks a new initiative for the coming year. Congratulations and thank you to each of them for their remarkable commitment.

Here are some more photos from the May 28 event.

Gallagher & Kennedy's Meg Smeck with children of Phoenix Day.

Gallagher & Kennedy’s Meg Smeck with children of Phoenix Day.

One of the many boxes of donated items gathered by the Gallagher & Kennedy women as gifts to the children of Phoenix Day.

One of the many boxes of donated items gathered by the Gallagher & Kennedy women as gifts to the children of Phoenix Day.

Gallagher and Kennedy attorney Jodi Bohr reads to a Phoenix Day student.

Gallagher and Kennedy attorney Jodi Bohr reads to a Phoenix Day student.

Phoenix Day students and Gallagher and Kennedy women professionals at the May 28, 2014, event.

Phoenix Day students and Gallagher and Kennedy women professionals at the May 28, 2014, event.

Fireworks fail. Legal in Arizona? Consult a map and ask a legislator. Stupid in Arizona? Every day, every way.

Legal in Arizona? Consult a map and ask a legislator. Stupid in Arizona? Every day, every way.

There’s a real love–hate relationship with fireworks. You could say people run hot or cold on the topic.

That is illustrated well in Arizona, where we legislate their purchase and use in ways that are not always entirely clear to the governed.

This week, an Arizona Republic story tries to clear the smoke from the issue. Titled “Valley cities brace for revamped fireworks law,” it opens:

“Cities and towns across metro Phoenix hope a change in state fireworks laws doesn’t prompt an increase in fires this Fourth of July. Senate Bill 1158, signed by Gov. Jan Brewer in April, requires municipalities in Maricopa and Pima counties to allow the sale and use of ground fireworks around July 4 and New Year’s Day.”

“The law allows their sale from May 20 through July 6 and from Dec. 10 through Jan. 3 and their use from June 24 through July 6 and from Dec. 24 through Jan. 3.”

Well, what could be confusing about that?

Read the whole story here.

In the law’s defense, the whole thing was pretty confusing before. Nearly everywhere you go, fireworks have been available for sale—but whether you could light them off was another matter.

I’ve always appreciated the irony of politicos bemoaning a lack of civic engagement and low levels of understanding of government, while allowing fireworks to be sold EVERYwhere—and then scratching that heads when people don’t “get it” that they can’t actually set them off most places.

I suppose lawmakers thought folks liked to display them in their dining room.

Are you planning on setting off anything more powerful than sparklers this Independence Day? And do you give a lot of thought to statutory pronouncements on fireworks, or do you take a more, ahem, intuitive approach to the matter?

Sure, you may be able to buy them. But are fireworks legal to set off in your community?

Sure, you may be able to buy them. But are fireworks legal to set off in your community?

Estate Planning wills trusts

I often communicate the results of the State Bar’s Lawyers on Call events after they occur. But as I looked at the topic for tomorrow’s pro bono lawyer event, I thought that many of us may have family or friends who could benefit from calling in. Please feel free to share this with them.

Tomorrow’s topic is estate planning (wills, trusts, more). The number to call is (602) 258-1212 (note: lawyers are only available at that phone number from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the days when Lawyers on Call is featured). Here is Bar news about the upcoming Lawyers on Call.

“If you should pass away unexpectedly, will your children be cared for by someone you love and trust? If you become incapacitated, will your business continue to thrive and grow? Will your family have to deal with bureaucracy during a time of sadness? Ease the stress associated with untimely death or accidents by seeking advice from an estate planning attorney for free on Tuesday, July 1.”

“Volunteer estate planning attorneys will answer your questions on the State Bar of Arizona, 12 News, and azcentral.com’s Lawyers on Call public service program. You can discuss your wills, trust, and estate planning issues with them for free from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July 1.”

Ak Chin Justice Center, whose ribbon-cutting occurred June 6, 2014. Maricopa, Ariz.

Ak Chin Justice Center, whose ribbon-cutting occurred June 6, 2014. Maricopa, Ariz.

Maricopa, Arizona, was the site of a June 6 community gathering that marked the opening of the Ak-Chin Indian Community Justice Center. The 56,000-square-foot building houses the tribal police department, court and detention center, as well as offices for public defenders, prosecutors and probation staff.

That’s the opening to my news story that will be published in the July/August Arizona Attorney Magazine. That’s also where we’ll include a smattering of photos.

But who doesn’t like more photos? So here are a few in this post. And you can see the whole set on our Facebook page here.

Have a great—and justice-filled—weekend.

Basket-weaving, an important component of the Ak-Chin culture, is apparent in the Ak-Chin Justice Center's design and appointments. The photo shows how the design influences the light fixtures.

Basket-weaving, an important component of the Ak-Chin culture, is apparent in the Ak-Chin Justice Center’s design and appointments. The photo shows how the design influences the light fixtures.

Tribal Judge Brian Burke describes features of the new courtroom space at the Ak-Chin Justice Center, June 5, 2014.

Tribal Judge Brian Burke describes features of the new courtroom space at the Ak-Chin Justice Center, June 5, 2014.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 President Johnson signs

President Lyndon Johnson signs into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Beginning Friday and continuing through next week, a series of Arizona events marks the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Phoenix events are covered in some detail on a dedicated Facebook page. They include:

  • The unveiling of a commemorative mural, Burton Barr Library, Friday, 10 a.m.
  • Voter registration/civic engagement event, State Capitol lawn, Saturday, 9 a.m.
  • Celebration dinner, First Institutional Baptist Church, Saturday, 5 p.m.
  • Community celebration, Carver Museum and Cultural Center, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 newspaper headlineAs the site describes the legislation:

“The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88–352, 78 Stat. 241, enacted July 2, 1964) is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation in the United States that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public (known as ‘public accommodations’).”

“Powers given to enforce the act were initially weak, but were supplemented during later years. Congress asserted its authority to legislate under several different parts of the United States Constitution, principally its power to regulate interstate commerce under Article One (section 8), its duty to guarantee all citizens equal protection of the laws under the Fourteenth Amendment and its duty to protect voting rights under the Fifteenth Amendment. The Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964 at the White House.”

I'm guessing your dog doesn't greet clients at your law office. You may want to rethink that. (Meet Rosie, Ruth Carter's companion.)

I’m guessing your dog doesn’t greet clients at your law office. You may want to rethink that. (Meet Rosie, Ruth Carter’s companion.)

If you’re like most lawyers, your office probably did little or nothing to mark National Doughnut Day.

Well, that’s a shame.

If that’s the case, then your office must not be that of Arizona attorney Ruth Carter. Ruth has many attributes and high points in her brief career—including being named an ABA Legal Rebel and being an author of multiple books. And now we can add pastry-sharer.

I mentioned doughnuts, so let’s get to it.

Ruth is aware of the great value in social interactions. And why not: One of her areas of focus is flash-mob law. So a day dedicated to fried-dough goodness seemed to her as good a time as any to gather her myriad circles in her new law offices. A Venn diagram with smiles and Bosa doughnuts at the center, you might say.

Every exuberant, Ruth Carter greets guests at her Doughnut Day open house.

Every exuberant, Ruth Carter greets guests at her Doughnut Day open house.

The June 6 event gave attendees the chance to visit with folks in different but affiliated industries. And we all got to catch up with what Ruth has cooking in her own practice. Smart move, that.

Plus, her wonderful Basset, Rosie, was present, as always.

Thanks, Ruth, for kicking off our June well. Here is the thank-you note I posted after the sweet, sweet event.

Doughnuts = the circle of life (or something, my thank-you note tried to convey).

Doughnuts = the circle of life (or something, my thank-you note tried to convey).

And how do you gather people informally in and around your practice? Doughnuts work, but they’re only one idea. Share yours!

State Bar of Arizona Bar Leadership Institute bannerHere’s where the rubber hits the road: You know an attorney whom you think is going to tear up the profession (in a good way). Or you suspect you’ve got the leadership DNA within yourself. But how to channel it?

An ideal development tool is on offer by the State Bar of Arizona, which is seeking applicants for its 2014-15 Bar Leadership Institute class.

For my money, this has been one of the Bar’s programs that has had the most impact on ensuring the profession’s future.

But get off the stick, leaders: The application deadline is tomorrow, June 20.

No worries: The Bar makes the process pretty easy. Here’s some more background.

As the Bar describes it, the Bar Leadership Institute is an award-winning nine-month professional development program. Since its inception in 2007 the BLI has prepared more than 100 attorneys for leadership positions within the Bar and the community-at-large. Program sessions cover a variety topics ranging from leadership, ethics and career development, to conversations with judges, government attorneys, in-house counsel and executives. Sessions occur monthly starting with a weekend retreat in September.

Attorneys selected to participate receive:

  • Up to two years of CLE credit
  • Leadership and related education and training in an experiential and mentoring learning environment
  • Opportunities to foster relationships with the State Bar of Arizona, partner bar associations, government and community leaders

Applications—available online here—will be accepted through June 20, 2014.

For questions or additional information, contact Elena Nethers, the State Bar’s Diversity and Outreach Advisor: Elena.Nethers@staff.azbar.org

It’s been my pleasure to work with BLI students and graduates, and I’ve always been impressed. Here’s hoping you offer up a name (maybe yours!) to participate.

Scott Fistler (aka Cesar Chavez) speaks at a Phoenix hearing, June 17, 2014.

Scott Fistler (aka Cesar Chavez) speaks at a Phoenix hearing, June 17, 2014.

It is hard to pass up commenting on a newspaper story titled “Cesar Chavez to be removed from ballot, plans to appeal.”

No, I wasn’t reading The Onion (much). This headline and story comes from the Arizona Republic.

And yes, there is a legal angle: a hearing this week in which the plaintiff alleged that the candidate—named Cesar Chavez—should be removed from the primary ballot for Congress, because … well, that’s where it got (even more) interesting. Here’s how Rebekah Sanders opened her article:

“A judge ruled Tuesday that Cesar Chavez, the former Republican who changed his name from Scott Fistler, will be removed from the primary ballot in the 7th Congressional District because hundreds of his signatures were invalid.”

“Chavez, who acted as his own attorney in a hearing in which he veered from comical antics to tearful testimony, vowed to appeal the decision to the Arizona Supreme Court.”

“He asked supporters to ‘funnel money’ to his campaign and find him legal counsel.”

You’re welcome, readers. Be sure to read Rebekah’s whole story here. And you also should follow her on Twitter (whence she posted updates from the cringe-worthy trial).

(What, you wonder if this went national and if Stephen Colbert covered the Arizona topic? You know he did!)

As Sanders pointed out, the candidate’s name—before his legal shift to adopt the name of a Hispanic American hero—was Scott Fistler.

Scott Fistler, center, speaks at the Urban Choices Phoenix District 4 forum, May 15, 2013.

Scott Fistler, center, speaks at the Urban Choices Phoenix District 4 forum, May 15, 2013.

As it turns out, I had the opportunity to interact with Scott (pre-Cesar) in May 2013. That’s when I moderated two candidate forums for those seeking Phoenix City Council seats. Scott wanted to become the new District 4 representative. (The other debate was for District 8.)

My view of the Phoenix City Council District 4 candidates, May 13, 2013. Scott Fistler is in the center (pink shirt).

My view of the Phoenix City Council District 4 candidates, May 15, 2013. Scott Fistler is in the center (pink shirt).

If you have a few minutes, you might enjoy watching a little of the District 4 forum, hosted by Urban Choices, during which Scott Fistler holds forth in multiple colorful ways (de colores, I guess you’d say?). It was held at the Viad Building in midtown Phoenix.

I also had the opportunity to channel my inner actor; that shtick runs from about 19:20 (until about 24:45).

Here is the District 4 debate with Fistler.

The District 8 forum is here. (It was held at the stellar Levine Machine on Grant Street in Phoenix’s Warehouse District.)

 

Here are two more shots from the forums:

Screen-grab of me moderating the Phoenix City Council District 4 forum, May 15, 2013.

Screen-grab of me moderating the Phoenix City Council District 4 forum, May 15, 2013.

Candidates and moderator Tim Eigo face the audience at the Phoenix City Council forunm May 16, 2013.

Candidates and moderator Tim Eigo face the audience at the Phoenix City Council District 8 forum, May 16, 2013.

Millennial Lawyers article June 2014 by Susan Daicoff

A few months ago, I was in conversation with a law school communications pro. She mentioned that a professor may be able to write an article on millennial lawyers. Would we be interested?

An article about younger lawyers, who are facing a nearly unprecedented bad economy? Who grew up and were schooled in ways distinctly different than their more-senior colleagues? Who will be inheriting and transforming the legal profession?

Hmmm …. Absolutely. Send it over and let’s talk.

She did, and we did. After some back and forth, we had what I suspected would be an extremely a valuable article for readers.

That article is in our June issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine. You can read it here.

Susan Daicoff

Susan Daicoff

The talented author is Professor Susan Daicoff; read more about her here.

Susan’s story is great reading for a few reasons, but what I especially appreciate are the specific takeaways she offers about a generation of professionals. But she is no cold-eyed anthropologist, examining these folks under a microscope. Instead, she displays her affection for them and her optimism for the profession under their evolving leadership.

Apparently, others see what we saw: We’re now up to two other magazines around the country that asked to reprint Susan’s article. It’s terrific to see good stuff get “out there.”

A realist, I’m still waiting for the other shoe to drop—a little one, anyway. What I wonder is this: Are there any millennial attorneys who resist being described and pigeonholed, who feel less identical to their own generation than to another that preceded it?

After all, even among generational waves of lawyers, we’re all individuals. So if your millennial experience varies from Susan’s description, I’d like to know.

Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

James E. Rogers

James E. Rogers

This morning, I share some very sad news from the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. The following note by Dean Marc Miller was distributed Sunday evening:

“I am sorry to share the sad news that our friend and namesake Jim Rogers (’62) passed away last night after a long battle with cancer. He was 75.

“All of you who knew Jim realize what a loss this is to the entire University of Arizona community, and we feel this loss especially deeply at the James E. Rogers College of Law.

“Jim’s passion for higher education, and indeed his passion for the role of great educational systems and institutions at all levels, was matched by his generosity towards those who create such institutions. He transformed Arizona Law and afforded all of us—students, faculty, and staff—opportunities that we would not have had without his vision and encouragement. His legacy continues in the programs he helped build, the students of lives he changed, and the many people here who became his friends, and his character and vision will continue to shape the experience and careers of future generations of graduates.”

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