Law School


State Bar of Arizona Bar Leadership Institute bannerHere’s where the rubber hits the road: You know an attorney whom you think is going to tear up the profession (in a good way). Or you suspect you’ve got the leadership DNA within yourself. But how to channel it?

An ideal development tool is on offer by the State Bar of Arizona, which is seeking applicants for its 2014-15 Bar Leadership Institute class.

For my money, this has been one of the Bar’s programs that has had the most impact on ensuring the profession’s future.

But get off the stick, leaders: The application deadline is tomorrow, June 20.

No worries: The Bar makes the process pretty easy. Here’s some more background.

As the Bar describes it, the Bar Leadership Institute is an award-winning nine-month professional development program. Since its inception in 2007 the BLI has prepared more than 100 attorneys for leadership positions within the Bar and the community-at-large. Program sessions cover a variety topics ranging from leadership, ethics and career development, to conversations with judges, government attorneys, in-house counsel and executives. Sessions occur monthly starting with a weekend retreat in September.

Attorneys selected to participate receive:

  • Up to two years of CLE credit
  • Leadership and related education and training in an experiential and mentoring learning environment
  • Opportunities to foster relationships with the State Bar of Arizona, partner bar associations, government and community leaders

Applications—available online here—will be accepted through June 20, 2014.

For questions or additional information, contact Elena Nethers, the State Bar’s Diversity and Outreach Advisor: Elena.Nethers@staff.azbar.org

It’s been my pleasure to work with BLI students and graduates, and I’ve always been impressed. Here’s hoping you offer up a name (maybe yours!) to participate.

Millennial Lawyers article June 2014 by Susan Daicoff

A few months ago, I was in conversation with a law school communications pro. She mentioned that a professor may be able to write an article on millennial lawyers. Would we be interested?

An article about younger lawyers, who are facing a nearly unprecedented bad economy? Who grew up and were schooled in ways distinctly different than their more-senior colleagues? Who will be inheriting and transforming the legal profession?

Hmmm …. Absolutely. Send it over and let’s talk.

She did, and we did. After some back and forth, we had what I suspected would be an extremely a valuable article for readers.

That article is in our June issue of Arizona Attorney Magazine. You can read it here.

Susan Daicoff

Susan Daicoff

The talented author is Professor Susan Daicoff; read more about her here.

Susan’s story is great reading for a few reasons, but what I especially appreciate are the specific takeaways she offers about a generation of professionals. But she is no cold-eyed anthropologist, examining these folks under a microscope. Instead, she displays her affection for them and her optimism for the profession under their evolving leadership.

Apparently, others see what we saw: We’re now up to two other magazines around the country that asked to reprint Susan’s article. It’s terrific to see good stuff get “out there.”

A realist, I’m still waiting for the other shoe to drop—a little one, anyway. What I wonder is this: Are there any millennial attorneys who resist being described and pigeonholed, who feel less identical to their own generation than to another that preceded it?

After all, even among generational waves of lawyers, we’re all individuals. So if your millennial experience varies from Susan’s description, I’d like to know.

Write to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

James E. Rogers

James E. Rogers

This morning, I share some very sad news from the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. The following note by Dean Marc Miller was distributed Sunday evening:

“I am sorry to share the sad news that our friend and namesake Jim Rogers (’62) passed away last night after a long battle with cancer. He was 75.

“All of you who knew Jim realize what a loss this is to the entire University of Arizona community, and we feel this loss especially deeply at the James E. Rogers College of Law.

“Jim’s passion for higher education, and indeed his passion for the role of great educational systems and institutions at all levels, was matched by his generosity towards those who create such institutions. He transformed Arizona Law and afforded all of us—students, faculty, and staff—opportunities that we would not have had without his vision and encouragement. His legacy continues in the programs he helped build, the students of lives he changed, and the many people here who became his friends, and his character and vision will continue to shape the experience and careers of future generations of graduates.”

Shawn C Marsh, Ph.D.

Shawn C. Marsh, Ph.D.

Bias? Why should the legal profession be concerned about bias—explicit or implicit?

As surprising as it might be to hear attorneys utter those words, they represent a position firmly held by some.

Meantime, on May 8, lawyers who thought otherwise packed two rooms—in Phoenix and Tucson—to hear an expert discuss implicit bias in the legal profession.

Hosted by the State Bar of Arizona, the presentation by Dr. Shawn Marsh answered my opening question handily: Because, perhaps even more than other professions, the legal profession and the legal system are peppered with decision points, each of which may go horribly awry because human beings are susceptible to bias.

First, let me give you the good doctor’s bio:

“Shawn C. Marsh, Ph.D., is the Chief Program Officer of Juvenile Law at the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Dr. Marsh is a social psychologist with research and teaching interests in the areas of psychology and the law, adolescent development, trauma, and juvenile justice. His background includes working with youth in detention and correction settings as an educator and mental health clinician, and he is a licensed school counselor, professional counselor, and clinical professional counselor. Dr. Marsh is affiliated with several academic departments at the University of Nevada, and his publications include numerous articles in scholarly journals such as Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice and Victims & Offenders, as well as chapters in textbooks such as Correctional Psychiatry and Juvenile Crime and Justice.”

His May 8 presentation to a standing-room-only room at the University Club explored the many ways our important decisions are steered by our biases. Spoiler alert: We cannot eliminate them; they are rooted in everyone’s cognitive processes. But we can be more mindful of them, and in so doing, work to minimize their effects.

His approach was humorous and non-confrontational. He shared the many ways we may be seeing the world through skewed eyes. Here is one humorous example that he offered:

Snoop Martha Stewart sterotype

So, Snoop and Martha Stewart give us pause. Excellent. Because pausing before we act is one of the strategy Marsh recommends as you make your way as a human. (Marsh listed about 14 strategies.)

Take a few minutes. Take the Implicit Association Test (which retired Chief Justice McGregor also recommends.) Educate yourself. Expose yourself to other cultures and people.

That last point led to one of the more intriguing anecdotes he shared. He explained that research has shown that relatively brief exposure to praiseworthy individuals in groups that are not yours (“out-group exemplars”) may lead us all to see the entire “other” group in a much more positive light. In fact, even a 30-second positive focus (perhaps in a news or sports story) may yield attitude and behavior changes that last 24 hours.

How can we maximize that effect? Marsh said at least a few courts have uploaded slideshows to serve as the screen-savers on the computers of judges and court staff. In a nation that exhibits disparate treatment (even in sentencing) based on race, viewing a continual slideshow of admirable people of color may have a long-term effect.

(That and other strategies are listed in this National Center for State Courts report.)

Finally, Marsh points out that though attitudes matter, so do behaviors. And those behaviors are often exhibited through our selection of words. So I leave you, as he did, with a great short video on the power that words may have on the actions of us and those around us.

 

 

JAGC tour of superior and municipal courts, May 8, 2014.

JAGC tour of superior and municipal courts, May 8, 2014.

This morning, I am pleased to share a news story that was sent my way by attorney Debbie Weecks. It involves a visit by members of a Judge Advocate General Corps to a civilian court.

If you have law-related news you’d like to share, send it to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org.

Here’s Debbie:

Our Luke AFB’s JAGC Corps broke with its quarterly Friday classroom from its own court setting and tradition this week. The JAGC instead enjoyed a local field day morning with a tour of the courts on Thursday, May 8. The group kicked off at Surprise Municipal Court at 7:45 a.m., where the Honorable Presiding Judge Louis Frank Dominguez gave a formidable overview of the municipal court system. Judicial Administrative Supervisor Lynn Mikus assisted in creating an instructional handout.

Next, the JAGC was greeted at Superior Court by the Honorable Presiding Judge Eilleen Willett for an overview of operations and court departments. Judge Willett was kind enough to lend her clerk out for the balance of the tour, so the members enjoyed the company and some insights courtesy of clerk John Charles Laws (a 3L at Summit Law). Thanks go out to all four NW Superior Court judges for spending time greeting and on Q&A (Judge Willett, and also Judge Jose Padilla, Judge Michael Kemp, and Commissioner Jacki Ireland), and to all their staff who pre-arranged and facilitated the tour.

The Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office graciously provided its escort, which gave the JAGC the opportunity during a snack break between courtrooms to learn about courtroom and courthouse security from Deputy Tony Jacobs. (A thanks is due to the Surprise location Paradise Bakery’s manager Cheryl for the cookies!)

The Self Service Center is an important service member resource when pro per, so the brief instructional by SSC clerks Marta and David was very useful!

Farther down the hallway, the JAGC was greeted by a prior JAGC officer, now Justice of the Peace, Gerald Williams. The four hour-plus tour ended with the JAGC members observing brief proceedings and interacting with North Valley J.P. Judge Williams and Hassayampa J.P. Judge Chris Mueller. With Judge Williams’ background prior to civilian life, the JAGC members were provided a comparative analysis of how certain matters are treated in the two court systems, including prepared handouts and thorough explanations on some more subtle criminal charge matters. Judge Mueller invited everyone to observe an interpreter in-custody plea bargain.

Overall, a great day for all involved!

law-schoolOn Monday, the University of Arizona reported that it will be “the first major research university to offer a Bachelor of Arts in Law” beginning in the fall of this year.

The initiative is a novel approach to serving an undergraduate community that seems less and less inclined to pursue a legal career, but which may find legal training a great benefit.

According to the school, the degree is “the product of a partnership between the James E. Rogers College of Law and the School of Government and Public Policy in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.”

In January, I got a brief preview of the new initiative when I interviewed UA Law School Dean Marc Miller for our magazine Q&A. At that time, the proposal remained unannounced as it was still in process to garner Board of Regents approval. Monday’s announcement indicated it had cleared that hurdle.

Why a B.A. in Law? As Dean Miller puts it:

“A Juris Doctor is a highly valuable degree and there are roles that only lawyers can serve. But training a broader range of students will serve society, open careers in areas of substantial regulation, respond to changes in technology and the forces of globalization, and invite opportunities for the delivery of new and more accessible legal services.”

The degree will require core courses taught by the university’s School of Government and Public Policy. Then, students can take their core law courses, taught by full-time law school faculty.

University of Arizona Law School logoThough the university intends to train students to “think like a lawyer,” the intended consumer of the new bachelor’s degree may not be headed toward a law school J.D.

Reports the university, “Possible careers open to graduates of the program include corporate compliance, city planning, water resources management, tax advising, business management, trade, banking and finance, conflict resolution, healthcare administration, contracts, government, human resources, policy analysis, and legal technology consulting.”

Those who opt for law school after graduation may find their way made easier by a “3+3” program, which will allow certain students to complete their B.A. and their J.D. in six years.

More news on the initiative is here and here.

What is your thinking on this initiative? Do you predict it will be a popular choice for undergrads? Do you interact with clients in positions that touch on legal issues whom you wish had some legal education? Would such a degree fill that need?

civil rights attorney and Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier

civil rights attorney and Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier speaks at ASU on Wednesday, April 16.

In year 19, ASU continues to invite great people to deliver its A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations. Tonight’s offering, by civil rights attorney and Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier, promises to keep in that tradition.

The event is free, open to the public, and requires no RSVP. But seats are often at a premium.

Guinier’s remarks are titled “Rethinking Race and Class.” She will speak tonight at 7:00 pm, in the Carson Ballroom of Old Main on the Tempe campus.

As ASU says,

“Guinier challenges conventional thinking on the issues of race and class. This lecture focuses on the ways that those who have been excluded (based on race or class) are like canaries in coal mines: their vulnerability signals problems with the larger atmosphere affecting us all.”

More information on the Lecture and Guinier is here.

And here is background on the Lecture’s namesake:

“The A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations was created in 1995 to perpetuate the work of a man who had devoted his life to the idea of racial parity. As professor and chair of sociology at Arizona State University, A. Wade Smith worked tirelessly to improve race relations on the ASU campus and within the greater community.”

I never had the opportunity to know Wade Smith, but I know and think very highly of his family. I am so pleased to see the Lecture continue and thrive.

[This article was edited 4/8/14 to reflect the fact that the dancers represented a lion, not a dragon. There is a traditional lion dance and a traditional dragon dance. Here is some information on the lion dance, performed at the APALSA event.]

Yes, that is a dragon at a legal event. Why do you ask? APALSA banquet dragon 1 04-05-14

Yes, that is a lion at a legal event. Why do you ask?

It never fails to amaze how often those new to a profession lead the way.

That’s what occurred to me last Saturday evening, as I attended the first-ever banquet of the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association (APALSA) of Arizona Summit Law School.

Out of the box, the talented law students took to heart a few of the most important lessons of professional event planning. Experienced (long in the tooth) planners, take note.

Here are three of those lessons, gleaned from Saturday’s gathering:

1. Food: Good, easy, relevant

Your legal event need not have food and drink. But if you go down that road, bring it, would you, please?

APALSA Asian Pacific American Law Students Assn logoAPALSA brought it, indulging its guests with terrific dishes from the Curry Corner. (Would it kill you to Like them on Facebook?)

This is how terrific their combination of various Asian foods was: I had planned to snack lightly at the event, as I had promised my younger daughter that we would get a bite together afterward. As I strolled the buffet line, though, that plan went out the window. Yes, I did get my daughter dinner later; but all my senses insisted that I eat a full meal at the APALSA banquet. And so I did.

A special shout out to law student Mary Tran, who hand-crafted a Thai iced tea that was the perfect complement to the meal. As I sit here Tuesday, I know my morning would be improved mightily by a glass of that!

All of the food and drink (plus the open bar) contributed to an evening of celebration and cultural identity. Nicely done.

2. Speaker: Smart, funny, brief

Let me be the first to say it: More Jared Leung, please.

Jared Leung

Jared Leung

The evening’s keynote was the Fennemore Craig lawyer, and he caught our attention in two ways.

First, he opened by admiring and critiquing the bathrooms in Fennemore Craig’s new-ish space. Restroom-talk is not the typical go-to intro for legal keynotes, but it got our attention as he described the difficulty some have mastering the motion-activated sinks. Leung’s message was about the importance of finding the sweet spot in our professional lives.

And that’s why Leung carried a tennis racquet (his second unique approach) up to the microphone.

“What are you comfortable doing as a lawyer?” he asked the assembled law students. “What is your thing?”

“If we just all stick with what we’re comfortable with,” he continued, “our growth will be limited.”

Punctuating his point with a tennis swing, he offered a story about a Queen Creek high school football player, Carson Jones, who, with some teammates, opted to stand up for a bullied special-needs classmate. (Read the story here.)

“Here we have a 16-year-old showing us how it should be done,” Leung said, explaining how Jones’s actions required courage. He reminded the students that law school and the legal profession offer ongoing opportunities to decide how and when to do the right thing.

Jared Leung delivers the keynote address (with tennis racquet) at the APALSA banquet, April 5, 2014.

Jared Leung delivers the keynote address (with tennis racquet) at the APALSA banquet, April 5, 2014.

“Get out of your comfort zone, and find the sweet spot. Someday I’ll learn from you.”

With a smile, Leung noted that he (like the rest of us) already was doing just that.

3. Lions: Yes, please

No, I suppose you’re right. Every legal event need not have a Chinese lion and a traditional lion dance. It might be odd to spring that on Bar Convention attendees.

But the APALSA banquet had one, and the articulated, two-man operation teaches us volumes about connecting with your audience.

First, it had obvious relevance to the association, and its presence was certainly evocative for many at the banquet.

APALSA President Vic Reid speaks at annual banquet, April 5, 2014.

APALSA President Vic Reid speaks at annual banquet, April 5, 2014.

But more important, it provided a lift in spirits—aurally and visually—that far too many bar events overlook. I’ve heard for too many years that legal affairs must be serious business—and then watched as attendees nodded off or checked their email during sonorous speeches.

No one checked email as the dragon marched about the room, demanding attention and collecting donations to the ASU Asian LEAD Academy. No one nodded off as the terrific DJ filled the room with music.

After all, the spirit is not fed only by footnotes and legal speeches. For your next event, consider a lion. Or maybe learn from TED talks. Or at least (please!) have some Thai iced tea.

Congratulations to APALSA and its president, Vicente Reid Y Lugto, and the whole board. I’m already looking forward to next year’s event.

Spot the lawyer: I also got the oportunity to pose with Asian community leaders and a talented Chinese dragon.

Spot the lawyer: I also got the opportunity to pose with Asian American community leaders and a talented Chinese lion.

APALSA Asian Pacific American Law Students Assn logoMark your calendars for this Saturday, April 5, when the first annual banquet of the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association (APALSA) of Arizona Summit Law School will be held.

The event is open to all, and proceeds will go toward scholarships for the ASU Asian LEAD Academy.

Here are some details:

  • Location: Arizona Summit Law School, 20th Floor- 1 North Central Phoenix, Arizona 85004
  • Time: 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm
  • Tickets: $15 pre-sale, $20 door

To purchase a ticket, email Larry Noyvong here: llnoyvong@student.azsummitlaw.edu

Here is a link to the ASU Asian Pacific Lead Academy. I have written about the great program and its results here.

There is a Facebook page for the event. And be sure to follow the Summit Law School’s APALSA organization here.

Thanks, to Vicente Reid Y Lugto, APALSA President, Arizona Summit Law School, for the detail and the invite.

APALSA banquet date 2014

Minority Bar Convention 2014 spring training for lawyers revised

It’s spring, so our days are filled with events. Today I mention an annual event, sponsored by the State Bar of Arizona, which is always helpful to lawyers in practice.

Formerly called the Minority Bar Convention (more on that in a minute), the Bar’s “Spring Training for Lawyers” covers a wide variety of practice topics. Maybe it’s something in the air at the location (the Desert Willow Conference Center), but I’m not sure I’ve ever sat through a weak seminar at the annual event.

Before I go on and one, here is where you can register. The conference is next week, on Thursday and Friday, March 27 and 28.

And the complete agenda and seminar descriptions are here.

Now to the name change.

I was a little surprised to see the longtime Minority Bar Convention transform into a baseball metaphor. Shifting from a storied brand is quite a change. Happily, the Bar has a video teasing the event, and it includes a discussion of the name change, as described by the co-chairs, attorneys Kami Hoskins and Chad Bellville.

Here is the video:

No matter the name, it appears that the event will continue its strong focus on quality. And for that, we must thank the State Bar of Arizona Committee on Minorities and Women in the Law.

My one passionate takeaway from the video? Buy a tripod, won’t you, State Bar? Let’s rifle through the closets; I’m sure we’ve got one somewhere.

Again, the location is the Desert Willow Conference Center, 4340 E. Cotton Center Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85040. Here is a map.

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