Immigration


Project Always logo - fights human trafficking and youth homelessnessA unique opportunity presents itself to attorneys this Friday and Saturday—the free chance to learn about human trafficking and perhaps to get some credit doing it.

The April 25-26 event will be staged by Project Always, a nonprofit law firm. Here is how they describe themselves:

“Project ALWAYS is a nonprofit law firm committed to providing free legal services and system reform advocacy to empower homeless children and youth and survivors of sex trafficking. Working through referrals from our social service partners, we help clients lift the legal barriers that stand in the way of opportunity, security, and self-sufficiency.”

At the site, you can read more about the Arizona firm, including its founding by attorney January Contreras and its leadership by former Judge Barbara Mundell. The Project also receives support from the Hickey Family Foundation and the Project’s fiscal sponsor, the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services and Education.

Barbara Mundell, founding board chair of Project Always

Barbara Mundell, founding board chair of Project Always

The training is titled Human Trafficking 101, and it covers immigration, criminal and civil remedies available to survivors of trafficking.

As the organizers say, the training includes “an in-depth overview of the legal issues facing victims of human trafficking, including criminal victim witness advocacy issues, immigration benefits, and civil remedies. Participants don’t have any registration fees, but must agree to take on one trafficking pro bono caseRegister online here under “News and Events,” or contact January Contreras at january@projectalways.org.

When:

Friday, April 25 & Saturday, April 26th 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Where:

CopperPoint Tower

3030 N. 3rd St.

8th Floor Auditorium

Phoenix, AZ 85012

Register:

Online, by end of business Monday, April 21

pro bono gavelFans of lawyers and the service they provide (count me in) always look forward to Law Day. Traditionally close to early May, Law Day helps cement the important connection between members of the public, attorneys, judges and the rule of law.

Searching for “law day” in my blog leads to a surprising number of hits over the years. Clearly, I am taken by the pro bono value attorneys provide (here is last year’s post). And this year is no exception.

Like last year, the State Bar of Arizona’s approach will be to offer free legal advice clinics, in the Valley and in Tucson. The clinics will cover a wide variety of legal topics, including landlord and tenant; bankruptcy and foreclosure; immigration; and divorce, child support and paternity.

Volunteer lawyers will conduct the 90-minute “information sessions.”

State Bar of Arizona SBA_Logo_Color“Guests can participate in one or more sessions at one of the five partner locations.”

The events will be held on Saturday, April 26. Please spread the word and share this post with anyone you think might benefit from some free legal advice.

All the detail, including times and specific locations, can be found here.

Later this week I will share another Law Day event, hosted by an independent legal organization. The more the merrier.

A compelling and charming film comes to Scottsdale on Sunday, Feb. 23.

A compelling and charming film comes to Scottsdale on Sunday, Feb. 23.

This Sunday in Scottsdale, the film Road to Eden will be shown at the Harkins Camelview. If your Sunday afternoon is still free, I urge you to see it. If it’s not, then break your other appointments and go.

When I sat down to write about it, I was just going to view the eight-minute preview available on the film’s website. But I was so taken by that clip, I decided to stay up way too late last night to view the entire film (which writer/director Doug Passon had provided to me in advance).

So I may be sleepy this morning, but that is entirely overborne by the pleasure and excitement I took away from the film.

Not knowing what to expect in a film made by someone whose day job is attorney (Doug works in the Federal Public Defender’s Office in Phoenix), I was surprised but intrigued to see the movie is an exploration of the Jewish holiday called Sukkot. Here is part of the film’s description:

“Road to Eden is a feature-length documentary film that captures the essence of Judaism’s most profound teachings about our connection to the earth, the fragility of existence, and our dream of a world perfected.”
“The spine of the film is the inspirational journey of Dan Nichols, a tour de force of modern Jewish music, who took his show on the road for the Jewish festival of Sukkot in October 2011. Dan and his incredible band Eighteen loaded into an RV and wandered through the Deep South. Each day of Sukkot brought a new town, a unique celebration, and uplifting, sometimes heartbreaking Sukkot stories.”

Before you make assumptions, this is not a movie made just for a Jewish audience. The messages it explores—about community, and ardor for a life fully lived, and about ever becoming a fuller self—are compelling ones for any viewer.

In addition, Doug told me, “Although the movie is rooted in Jewish thought, the themes of the film are universal and particularly relevant to the legal community, with a heavy emphasis on immigrant rights and social justice.”

"Road to eden" includes beautiful visual markers throughout that should be printed, framed and displayed.

“Road to Eden” includes beautiful visual markers throughout that should be printed, framed and displayed. (Here’s just one.)

Those last two elements come through strongly, especially as Dan Nichols and his bandmates travel through Alabama, which at the time had just enacted a harsh anti-immigration law (“the Arizona law on steroids,” as a Diane Sawyer describes it in a news clip). And the journey about Sukkot is masterfully capped by an extended discussion about Martin Luther King, Jr. As we hear from a fellow civil rights advocate, Rev. Samuel “Billy” Kyles, who stood next to King as he was shot in Memphis, viewers may be moved to explore their own choices and the public policies that guide us all. It is a deeply moving interview.

If you only view the movie to learn more about Sukkot, a below-the-radar holiday, it would be worth it. (The holiday requires construction of a temporary structure, largely open to the elements, recalling those who had been freed from slavery in Egypt but who had to wander before ever finding a permanent home.) Seeing the variety of creative ways people celebrate is marvelous. But it wasn’t until about 40 minutes in that I could see that all of us humans may be encapsulated in Sukkot—at least, all of us humans who are still questing and aiming to improve.

Here is Dan Nichols praising the Jewish kids camps that dot the country and that mean so much to those who attend:

“Who’s there? These living, breathing Sukkot, these children, who are in transition, who are not strong structures yet. They are still trying to figure out who they’re gonna be, what’s important to them, what they stand for.”

Open-eyed viewers may see a little of themselves in those summer camps.

The generational imperative is strong in the film, and it is emphasized finally in the civil rights advocate interview. Dan asks Reverend Kyles how he continues on, even in the face of heartbreak like the assassination of Dr. King. The answer: We still have a long way to go. But “these young people will find ways that we cannot imagine.”

Before I sign off, I must point out two additional strong elements of the film: The music (yes, it’s a band-on-the-road film) is fantastic, heartfelt, beautifully composed and sung. And the interstitial illustrations that pepper the film are remarkable, wisely chosen and perfectly evoke the path on a road to a better world. Animation was done by ZAZ Animation Studio, Israel.

The film is playing one time, as part of the Greater Phoenix Jewish Film Festival. Tickets are available for purchase on the Festival website, or you can buy tickets at the theatre right before the screening. Students are 1/2 price.

The film screens Sunday, Feb. 23, at 3:00 pm, at Harkins Camelview Theatre, 7001 E. Highland Ave., Scottsdale 85251. I hope to see you there.

More about the film is here.

inspection line at Ellis Island

Inspection line at Ellis Island

A hundred and twenty-two years may seem a rather unremarkable anniversary to note. But because it is thoughtful and well written, I point you to a blog post about the opening of Ellis Island on January 1, 1892.

That facility in New York was to witness—or block—the passage of millions of people. But more than a way-station, Ellis Island has become an iconic element in the American imagination. And like most icons, its reality is a complex blend of joy and heartbreak.

As others have pointed out, Ellis communicates important messages about the vagaries of immigration law and the response of a nation to those who seek to join.

Here’s how the blog post opens:

“On January 1, 1892, Ellis Island opened to process the millions of immigrants entering New York. Although certainly not only entry point for immigrants, it was the primary location where the immigrants needed to labor in American factories first experienced the country. Annie Moore, an Irish immigrant, was the first person to go through processing that morning, one of over 12 million who would enter the country from this point before the facility closed in 1954.”

 …

“In order to manage the enormous numbers, at the beginning of 1892, the federal government opened the processing facility at Ellis Island. Until 1890, the federal government played basically no role in immigration processing and the state of New York ran the precursor to Ellis Island. On the first day of the new facility’s opening, 700 immigrants passed through its gates; by the end of 1892, 450,000 had arrived and 1897, 1.5 million people. The peak year for Ellis Island was 1907, when slightly more than 1 million people were processed for entry at the site.”

“For immigrant labor, the experience of Ellis Island combined hope and dread. Here was the land of opportunity—if one could get in. Of course most did. But some did not. Immigrants, most of whom did not speak English, were often petrified at the process of medical checks and chalk marks on coats. If one member of the family received a special mark, would they be separated? Imagine the terror.”

Read the complete post here.

For insight onto a modern-day analogue to our attitude toward immigration, I suggest you read this essay by Arizona Attorney’s own Roxie Bacon. In her magazine column, she relates the story of the Somali people behind the movie “Captain Phillips.” Clearly, our complicated attitude toward immigration has barely shifted.

Barkhad Abdi (left) and Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips

Barkhad Abdi (left) and Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips

And more on Annie Moore is here.

Immigrant Annie Moore and her brothers depicted at the harbor of Cobh, Ireland

Immigrant Annie Moore and her brothers depicted at the harbor of Cobh, Ireland

pro bono gavelHere is some news from my colleague Alberto Rodriguez. He regularly reports on a successful program providing legal information to the public. Congratulations and thanks to those lawyers who shared their time and talent.

State Bar of Arizona SBA_Logo_ColorThe State Bar of Arizona and 12 News hosted the August Lawyers on Call on Tuesday, August 6. The topic covered in that evening’s public service program was immigration law.

Eight attorneys volunteered their time and experience to help inform callers about immigration issues. Seven of the eight attorneys were first-time volunteers. The lawyers were (click their names for more information):

A total of 51 calls were answered by the volunteer attorneys—which is substantially lower when compared to other phone banks. This is the second immigration Lawyers on Call phone bank that has resulted in low numbers—an issue we’ll consider when planning for 2014. As always, our volunteers offered helpful information, solutions and resources to callers.

12 News Phoenix logoHere is a sample of consumer questions:

  • Can I have dual citizenship? If so, how do I go about it?
  • How do I get legal status for my undocumented fiancé?
  • What are the requirements for Deferred Action?
  • Will a minor criminal charge affect my eligibility for citizenship/Deferred Action?
  • Can children petition on behalf of their parents?

Overarching questions were related to qualifications for citizenship and how to proceed with the citizenship petition.

A panel discussed the immigration proposal created by the “Gang of Eight” in the PBS studio Friday. Moderated by former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl, the panel represented a variety of viewpoints. (Cydney McFarland/Downtown Devil)

A panel discussed the immigration proposal created by the “Gang of Eight” in the PBS studio Friday. Moderated by former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl, the panel represented a variety of viewpoints. (Cydney McFarland/Downtown Devil)

This week, I may be fortunate to bring you two follow-ups to an immigration reform panel discussion held last week at the downtown Phoenix ASU Cronkite Journalism School.

The event, moderated by Sen. Jon Kyl, occurred in the studios of KAET, the PBS affiliate.

The first summary is ably done by reporter Zachary Hillenbrand of the Downtown Devil.

Don’t know the Downtown Devil? You should. It provides great reporting in a manner that news consumers increasingly want: In a hyperlocal variety. They cover downtown Phoenix and its environs in a compelling and occasionally cheeky way. They are an independent news center, populated by many grads of the ASU J School but unaffiliated with Arizona State University.

In any case, here is how the reporter opens his story:

“ASU participated in a nationwide discussion about immigration reform through forums held at various colleges and universities Friday. Experts at the ASU forum, held in the PBS television studio at the Walter Cronkite School, discussed a proposal created by a bipartisan group of eight senators, known as the “Gang of Eight,” and issues with the current immigration system.”

“Moderated by former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl, the panel of experts provided a range of viewpoints on the issue. The panelists included Glenn Hamer, president and CEO of Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry; Tamar Jacoby, president and CEO of ImmigrationWorks USA; Lisa Magana, ASU associate professor at the School of Transborder Studies; Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery; attorney Daniel R. Ortega; and Mesa Mayor Scott Smith.”

Keep reading here.

Video of the event is here.

Later this week, I expect to provide another write-up, this one by a community organizer.

In the meantime, bookmark the Downtown Devil and start following them wherever you like to follow news sources.

I will be unable to attend this immigration reform panel disucussion on Friday, April 19, but if you do, let me know what was said (guest blog post, anyone?).

All the information is at this link, and the bones of the matter are pasted in below:

Immigration Reform Panel at ASUImmigration Reform – Is It Time And What Should It Include?

Former Senator John Kyl to moderate panel on immigration reform – April 19 Political, business and non-profit leaders gather to propose and discuss practical solutions

WHAT: A panel discussion exploring the complexities surrounding immigration reform, including its timing, feasibility and potential scope. Border security, the path to citizenship, and visas for individuals working in STEM-related fields are among the topics to be addressed. This forum is part of Arizona State University’s The Challenges Before Us project, created to tackle some of the many challenges facing society today. These forums are designed to open a dialogue between experts, practitioners and the community at large.  Eight, Arizona PBS will broadcast the event live on Eight World, channel 8.3.  For more information visit: http://forum.asu.edu/forum/immigration-reform.

WHEN: Friday, April 19 from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.  (Light refreshments available at 10:45 a.m., all guests must be seated by 11:15 a.m., program begins promptly at 11:30 a.m., broadcast live on Eight World, channel 8.3.)

WHERE: Eight, Arizona PBS, Studio A (555 N Central Ave, Phoenix, 85004), 6th floor – on the Downtown Phoenix campus of ASU

Keep reading here.

Lincoln_by John Holcomb

Abraham Lincoln would want you to share news of the State Bar’s great Law Day event. (painting by John Holcomb)

The State Bar of Arizona has a rich tradition of participating in Law Day, that annual national event reminding all of us how valuable the rule of law can be. And this year, they continue that commitment.

I have been privileged to moderate the Bar’s Law Day event a few times. In 2008, our topic was judicial merit selection, and we had a blast with a talented panel of speakers who are lawyers and judges. When I moderated, I had the chance to ask challenging questions that (I hope) led panelists to explore the topic fully.

I recall being offered a deep scowl when I devil’s-advocated a former Bar President panelist with the question, “So why not sign on to Senate confirmation of judges? Our current system came from Missouri, not from Moses.”

The next year, I was the moderator of our program centered on the screening of competing Law Day videos created by high school students. Much of it is a blur, but I do recall that I wore a beard and stovepipe hat to honor Abraham Lincoln. (Good times. No photo survives.)

So my Law Day affection is deep and abiding, and that’s why I am looking forward to this year’s offering by the Bar (no moderating required).

The Bar’s events will occur on Saturday, April 27, and they aim to provide the highest possible testimony to the value of our legal system—by providing actual legal information to those who need it most.

State Bar of Arizona logoThe very ambitious programming will cover four-plus legal topics, and the information will be provided at five locations around the Valley and in Tucson. There will be no charge.

More information on the clinics is here, or contact my colleague Alberto Rodriguez at 602-340-7293 or alberto.rodriguez@staff.azbar.org.

And if any lawyer-readers want to participate by offering her or his services, for one session, a half-day or (dare I ask it?) a full day, also contact Alberto. He is seeking lawyers who can provide information in the following focus areas: landlord/tenant; immigration (there will be sessions in both Spanish and English); divorce, child support and paternity; and bankruptcy and foreclosure. 

Abe Lincoln would have been proud.

And for those who join me in being pleased at the Bar’s commitment to legal services and the value of lawyers and law, let me share one anecdote that I read at my Law Day moderator gig in 2008:

“During the Suez Invasion of 1956, the British Prime Minister was careful to exclude opinions that disagreed with his approach. He specifically instructed that Sir Gerald Fitzmaurice, the very distinguished Legal Advisor to the Foreign Office, and who had strongly and consistently advised that the British action was unlawful, should not be informed of developments: ‘Fitz is the last person I want consulted. The lawyers are always against our doing anything. For God’s sake, keep them out of it. This is a political affair.’”

That quality—of independent and honest counsel—is more valuable and more in need than ever before. Remember to share around the Bar’s Law Day agenda and encourage participation.

ASU Law Journal for Social Justice logoToday, some news from a noteworthy journal at the ASU College of Law:

“On March 1, join the Law Journal for Social Justice for a daylong symposium featuring attorneys, judges, community advocates, and legal scholars as we examine how to transform an inherently unfair criminal justice system into one that values fairness and efficiency.”

“Featured speaker Paul Charlton, former U.S. Attorney for the District of Arizona, leads off the day with a discussion about ethics and sentencing reform. Other panel topics include vulnerable populations in the criminal justice system, the mental health crisis within the criminal justice system and ways to reform the system in a more fair and efficient way.”

More information on speakers, the agenda and a link to register are here.

And be sure to follow the journal on Facebook here.

ASU Justice conference March 2013 agenda and poster

debate microphoneEvent images have been added to the bottom of this post.

At 11:15 this morning, the one and only forum of candidates for Maricopa County Attorney will occur. I encourage you to attend.

First of all, I have to divulge: I will be moderating the forum. But as we know, the moderator’s main job is to speak little and to let the candidates do most all the talking. Though that may not always work well (yo, Jim Lehrer), that is my plan and I’m stickin’ to it.

The more important reason to attend is that this is an incredibly important elected office. Even if there is little doubt about the race’s outcome between Libertarian Michael Kielsky and Republican Bill Montgomery (no Democratic candidate was fielded), I still think that hearing what people stand for counts for a lot.

The topics themselves are some of the most noteworthy in our communities: charging, sentencing, immigration, drug use, medical marijuana, campaign finance, prison alternatives, capital punishment, identity theft. And those are just a few of the things we may cover.

Phoenix School of Law logoYou and others may participate in a few ways. First, of course, you can come to the forum. It’s from 11:15 a.m. until 12:15 p.m., at the Phoenix School of Law, One N. Central Ave., Room 1715. Your questions will be welcomed at the end of the hour.

The other way to be a part of the process: Send me a suggested question. You can post it below, or email it to me at arizona.attorney@azbar.org. I will check my email right up until we begin at 11:15, so fire away.

I hope to see you there.

Here are some images from the debate panel:

L to R: Candidate Bill Montgomery, Phoenix School of Law Professor Keith Swisher, candidate Michael Kielsky

L to R: Candidate Bill Montgomery, Phoenix School of Law Professor Keith Swisher, candidate Michael Kielsky

L to R: Candidate Bill Montgomery, Phoenix School of Law Professor Keith Swisher, candidate Michael Kielsky

L to R: Candidate Bill Montgomery, Phoenix School of Law Professor Keith Swisher, candidate Michael Kielsky

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